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All comments by Jonathan Mestel
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A quick anything shows that he knew that “anything” was the right bid. A slow “anything” shows that he didn't. Some people need time to work these things out, and it does not always imply one should bid on. Weren't there 3 top losers?
Sept. 6, 2016
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Of course he was thinking of both 3NT and whether his hand was strong enough to invite slam, and possibly whether the auction could die in 4. That's what he would be thinking about if he'd bid quickly too, but come to a faster conclusion. If he's like me, unable to assess the value of his hand instantly, he would be constructing possible hands for partner. He has perhaps reluctantly decided that investigating 3NT was not worth it or too murky and he has bid 5 in what we assume is a discouraging manner. Why does this encourage us to bid slam?
Our hand gambled, and struck lucky. Opponents get an unlucky bad result. It happens.
Sept. 6, 2016
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It is crucial that hesitations should suggest a certain action; they should not get penalised automatically. I do not think 5 suggests he was thinking of slam at all.

It is not clear to me what partner's 5 shows. Therefore, it will not have been clear to him. Obviously he had other calls to consider, and I would expect him to think before bidding it on any hand. Therefore, no UI. Therefore no penalty.
Sept. 5, 2016
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I've commented on this elsewhere. I don't think you should specify without knowledge that 4 is natural - most would play this as fit, I think. I doubt many play a forcing, natural 3 either.
For me, 5 - puts a lot of pressure on opponents.
Sept. 2, 2016
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If East held QJ9x Kx x AJxxxx why was he in such a hurry to cash a heart trick? It wasn't going anywhere, and he might have established two pitches, Left to ourselves we would try to ruff two spades in hand. So I think East doesn't have a stiff . So I'll cash two spades and if nothing exceptional happens I'll lay down A, check my addition, and run J. Equally, I could ruff a first - this loses to Q9x and Q9 with East, but gains against 9x or xx.
Was East a strong player? My feeling is that his defence is more likely with Q.
Sept. 2, 2016
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Max you'd be welcome here. We'd even let you play a multi without cluttering the table with system notes.

With one partner I play 1NT-(2-level-overcall)-double as takeout of the suit bid, regardless of what the overcall actually means. As such, it is normal not to enquire immediately. If I do enquire and then double of course it means the same thing, but perhaps with slight UI for partner.

I find it hard to believe that trained ACBL directors would permit a system which depended on whether an enquiry took place. But without a companion hand with an enquiry followed by a natural 2 bid, it would be hard to prove. Is there not a section of the CC which describes “action over interference”?
Sept. 2, 2016
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Yes, Ralph's & Henk's line works of course. The critical point is that trumps are frozen. After A A J A J West cannot exit with either major and so has to kill East's potential entry with 10. We're all used to keeping a late entry to dummy; sometimes a late entry to an opponent is also useful.

Uğur, I think after your line East can cash two s and wait for a -trick. If West held K, your line might work in practice.

Thanks for comments.
Sept. 2, 2016
Jonathan Mestel edited this comment Sept. 2, 2016
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Of course, but I think +1 is more likely than -2, and you make it much harder for opponents. On the actual hand, par is 4 but we'll play 5x-1. I think you would find a majority bid 5 if you ask them.
Sept. 1, 2016
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AQJ10x xx xxx 10xx will raise a delicate club bid? These are hardly magic cards but you're favourite for 13tricks. You have the best hand at the table, and partner has made a vulnerable overcall - I think you trust non-vul opponents too much. 5 and then double 5, feels normal to me.
Sept. 1, 2016
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5 is decidedly agressive? How surprised would you be to make two overtricks? As for 6, maybe he thought partner's pass was encouraging?
Sept. 1, 2016
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I see no point arguing with the poster about their agreement, unless it's to complain she didn't specify it in the OP. She did state that had we doubled 6 it would be the same problem, so implicitly the double is not Lightner, whether we think it should be or not.
Partner has values outside diamonds. Heart tricks might disappear or require establishing. A might get ruffed. I lead a .
Aug. 31, 2016
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You're a light sleeper!! You must have missed out several pre-Utopian stages. For example, in England, at one time 1NT-2C had to be alerted whatever it meant…it made sense at the time.
Aug. 31, 2016
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Very neat. Especially the ways other orders of playing AKQ and K fail. Thanks.
Aug. 29, 2016
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So you're hoping for 800 rather than the 680 you expect from bidding? Fair enough.
Aug. 29, 2016
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I don't think that quite works. When you lead a 2nd club up East plays the Q. I don't think you can “endplay West” as you say, because you can't remove his and exit cards in time - When East gets it he plays a .
I don't see how to do it yet…
Aug. 29, 2016
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I am but mad when I sit North and West. When my seat is southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw.
Aug. 28, 2016
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I have no idea where I'm heading, but I'll try 4 over 3. Maybe he won't bid 4. I will treat partner's suggestion that 3 was forcing as UI, if only for reasons of Causality.
Aug. 28, 2016
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Sorry, I don't follow - maybe I wasn't clear. A, A, K, and declarer leads K, which you win.

Is it obvious to you he doesn't hold AQx KQJxxx Kxx x? If you play a , two clubs go away, and arguably partner has defended perfectly?
Aug. 28, 2016
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Do you agree partner's pass is forcing? What sort of hand do you think he has?
Aug. 28, 2016
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1 and then 3 for me. While hands with two voids may not make good bidding problems, they make for excellent stories, and I look forward to this one.
Aug. 28, 2016
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