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All comments by Jordi Sabate
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I agree with the line first proposed by Mark Kaptein and later explained by Kit.

I want to mention some other facts:

- There are 10 spades left (including A and K) and 6 more points missing in the other suits, but no opponent has overcalled 1 or 2. I think it's a good bet that both have semibalanced hands.

- The lead under K from a strong opponent probably means that he thinks an agressive lead is called for, so again I assume that diamonds (dummy's suit) and hearts split reasonably for declarer.

- If a strong opponent lead under a King, normally he has a long suit there (in case of a short suit he is not so afraid of a discard of a loser by declarer). So probably East has 5 clubs, and then, no 5 spades (because I assume a semibalanced hand).

So, I think that all the probability calculations of the distribution of the K and A have to consider these facts. In my opinion, the probability of success if we follow Mark and Kit line of play is pretty high.
July 10, 2018
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I just hope that one day we could say again “Today I play the most important hands of my bridge career”, but now it's a bit more difficult :)
Oct. 20, 2016
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But you have already removed a heart in East hand. If they play a second spade, you can now win with spades 3-3 or 2-4 if hearts are 8-1 (very probable). In the last case, you can play AKQ and another spade, East plays a diamond and you can finesse in clubs, winning the contract in any case (West has a 4-1-5-3 hand if our heart layout suposition is correct).
June 19, 2016
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Hi, Kit. Why don't play A before playing J? I think that you protect against this layout with no downside (you have to guess later that spades are 2-4). In this case, Deep Finesse tells that West has to rise with A (very difficult) in order to begin ruffs with another .
June 18, 2016
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Nice hand. Not so easy if nobody alert you that there is a problem.
Dec. 20, 2015
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Nice hand. And congratulations for your web page. It's the first time I have seen so many interesting problems that can be played as in a real table
Nov. 21, 2015
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Excellent
June 20, 2015
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Some Precision systems have the possibility to “switch” to natural bidding if the captain of the bidding wants to. So you can choose which hands need “technical” or “judgement” information. Kit's column showed us this many times.
Oct. 12, 2014
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In Precisión we can open all 11-12H hands, no matter if are “good” or “bad”, and maybe some “good” 10 counts. In natural you can only open those hands if you have a nice distribution, otherwise you can mislead partner.
Oct. 11, 2014
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Thank you for your comments. What you say “To be able to know you have a fit at once works much better over opponents preempts and overcalls” it's true but we think that happens more often in Precisión (more 1, 1 and 2 openings than natural systems).
Oct. 11, 2014
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Nice article. Thank you
Sept. 27, 2014
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Nice job
June 27, 2014
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Let's see what Kit thinks about this, but IMO spades are more probable 5-2 after the 8 lead, because AQ108 it's not a very popular 1NT lead. Maybe West have 108xx, but I still agree that A and PRC is a better aproach
May 10, 2014
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Impressive work, Kit.

In my opinion, it's quite clear that, with video recording and these results available, the doctors cheated. Quite curiously, there are still people trying to defend them.

For some of the 13 hands that no fit exactly with the survey (I agree with you and Dean that most of them are “false positives”) is possible to check the numbers of coughs in the video of the final, but somebody has to watch it very accurately (cards in dummy and play of the hand may help to recognize the hand) in order to check the actual signal.
April 29, 2014
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When I thought about this hand, first thing was try to figure out about distributions in opponents hands. The XX was alerted as two 4-card suits, one of them and the other a major (for the bidding). The 2 bid by East was the first suit he “could” play, so it's a 3-card suit.

If East distribution was 3-3-4-3, I'm sure he would have bid 2 first (a winning action if West has 4 diamonds, and a no-lose action otherwise, because then there's a 7 card fit in a major, which is as good as an hypothetical 7-card fit in ).

So it seems that West is 3-4-4-2 and East is 4-2-4-3. In this scenario, East cannot bid 2 because West could have and as his 4-card suits.

So it was a surprise for me that Rodwell play that J finesse. There something I'm missing, for sure.
April 17, 2014
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I have made my predictions. I wonder how many leads Doc will guess.

Just for curious people: I played against them twice, always with Elinescu as my screenmate. I remember him like a very funny player, always joking.

Last time was some months after the Buratti-Lanzarotti affair. Playing a hand, I went down after a normal declarer play, but I realised I could have made my contract after a very inferior percentage play. Elinescu turned to me and said, with a big smile: “Don't worry. Only Buratti would find that line!”.
April 15, 2014
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Thank you for this excellent article, Kit. Nice bidding decission, interesenting avalaible bids over 4 (specially that “inclusión” Blackwood) and interesting play options, too.

All these hands are from you/your partner/your teammates in the Bermuda Bowl?
March 10, 2014
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Kit, there's sometinhg strange in this hand. Would East double with AQJ109 in hearts and nothing else? That's a big risk considering that partner could have a heart singleton. Even after a heart lead you have only one trick (or 2 if you play QA, leaving the K good in dummy).

I think we have to consider East double a more serious bid than East 1 openning in third seat, NV against V. So, it's hard to believe, but maybe West is joking and East has another high card outside hearts.
Jan. 17, 2014
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I think that it is not necessary to get the J clue to see the winning solution. Declarer would never play A at the first round of clubs if he has the J either, because it's too risky to let North in with the King. So partner is favourite to have that card
Dec. 16, 2013
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Nice hand! I hope one day this position happens at the table … and I will be ready to see it
Oct. 29, 2013
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