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All comments by Kevin O'Brien
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Hi Keith,

Good to know! Thanks for informing me!
Feb. 21, 2018
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Thanks, Monty. I found MacKinnon while searching for “Jeannie, the movement Wizard” – but that's all I found – no sign of the program. I have the Tim Hill msthematica-generated Web movements both from the MIT Bridge Club site (older) and the Westwood DBC site (current as of 2016).

So I'm still searching.
Feb. 18, 2018
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no sign of program yet … found this:
Ian MacKinnon - The Bridge World
https://www.bridgeworld.com/indexphp.php?page=/pages/bookstore/authorgallerypages/authorgallerypage_309.html
Duplicate Bridge Schedules, History and Mathematics by Ian MacKinnon. List Price: $74.95 Discount Price: $52.46 You Save: 30% 427 pages. Hardcover. The Bridge Movements Encyclopedia. This is an essential book for tournament directors as well as bridge players curious about the history of the game of duplicate …
Feb. 17, 2018
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I believe the information and movements available at http://www.bridgewebs.com/cgi-bin/bwok/bw.cgi?club=westwood&pid=display_page5 is an improvement on that at the MIT site.
Feb. 16, 2018
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Tim Hill (of Westwood DBC, Massachusetts) has all those rover and party table Web movements in ACBLscor .mov file format; download from the Westwood DBC site.
Feb. 14, 2018
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I'm moving a very small club session to an expensive retirement facility where we are being welcomed by the staff with the hope that their residents will come out for right-after-dinner evening Bridge once a week.

My plan is to run the probably-less-than-five-tables weekly duplicate in the same space (5 tables will half-fill the space) with a couple of tables of rubber Bridge, and hope the growing familiarity of the residents with the “outside Duplicate” players will lead some to try joining the Duplicate players.

No matter what they play, the residents will pay zero. If they don't come out at all, I expect our presence at the facility will be short-lived.

Staff seem excited about local Sectionals and our annul Regional, suggesting they can transport interested residents to local tournament venues … but we will of course need “interested residents” to make this work.

Staff are also excited about “The Longest Day” – already familiar with Alzheimer's Association through their Walk events each October, which get considerable interest and support from the residents. We will of course push for similar support for the Bridge game during our weekly session in the June 17-24 time specified by ACBL for 2018.

I'm not sure I can add on-site lessons, or that I have time to offer them. I may be able to offer at-the-table help for rubber bridge players while simultaneously directing the small duplicate. How well do you think teaching straight from “A Taste of Bridge” would fit in this environment?

I'll appreciate any advice/suggestions/pointers based on your experience, Jeff – and finding out more about keeping Rubber Bridge records for the players.

Anyone else want to weigh in?
Jan. 30, 2018
Kevin O'Brien edited this comment Jan. 30, 2018
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Hi Ellis,

Our unit got Daily Electronic Bulletins for Sectional and our NLM Regional through Bridge Finesse AT NO CHARGE. For each tournament, we were asked to make a contribution to ACBL's Educational Foundation, and we did.

Not only was the product exactly what we expected, we also got outstanding customer service from the Bridge Finesse staff.

I would be surprised if others using Bridge Finesse for Tournament Daily Bulletins had a different experience.

Thanks,

Kevin
Jan. 28, 2018
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Every Bridge Club I have managed, and several I have recruited, has used The Common Game as provider of hands to play. Most use The Common Game's listing of results but also post the results separately.

The Common Game participation costs the club $ZERO, and costs the players $ZERO.

The only PII requested of the players is an e-mail address, and even that is not required.

See http://www.thecommongame.com/CGFAQ.html for more details.

As for REACH, participation and information collected is entirely voluntary on the part of the player.
Jan. 24, 2018
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Steve Robinson has 7NT. I saw in the same parking lot TRY 7NT, 7NT, and 7NT X. My ride to that tournament was in 7NT XX, if my memory is correct. Too bad all 4 were never parked next to each other!
Jan. 23, 2018
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Don't hold your breath while waiting for the ACBL Board of Directors to speak, Steve!
Jan. 22, 2018
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Forming teams and assigning strats are done outside of ACBLscore. ACBLscore supports Swiss Teams, and you can enter the strats manually, ignoring or overriding the ACBLscore calculated strats. I don't have a cookbook, but if anyone who does wishes to share it, I'm sure many (well, at least several) would benefit from the work already done in creating this.
Jan. 10, 2018
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LC Standard came out five-or-so years ago the final post here on Bridge Winners in 2012, with the same objective as this 2018 effort. LC Standard moved on to the ACBL Bulletin, where it appeared in a series of articles.

You may remember Larry first made upside-down carding part of the system. That was a lead balloon, lasting only a few hours before being ousted and replaced by “standard” carding – see https://bridgewinners.com/article/view/lc-standard-carding/ and the comments therein.

Eugene Hung and Polly Siegel tested the system in a club game, see https://bridgewinners.com/article/view/adventures-with-lc-standard/

It will e interesting to see where this goes;for a three-minute discussion between th Partnership Desk, buying the entry, finding the table, and pulling the first board's cards out, I'm sure a checklist will be needed to augment the basic agreements.

Let's see where this one goes – and then how widely it is adopted and used..
Jan. 6, 2018
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I hope you're right, Eric – but only time will tell. Culture Change can take a while to trickle down from the top to all layers of the bureaucracy.
Jan. 5, 2018
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Eventually ACBL management will say something abut this – maybe sooner now that the news is out and hiding under a Cone of Silence will just lead to useless speculation and conjecture.

Still, I won't hold my breath waiting for ACBL's announcement – I strongly suggest that you follow my example!
Jan. 5, 2018
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WBL (ACBL unit 147) runs a 3-league KO in the winter and similar round-robin league in he summer. Their website at http://districtsix.org/wblHome2.aspx has more info by clicking on WBL Knockout.
Jan. 3, 2018
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Ping,

The half of the Swiss out of contention still plays in the Swiss. The eliminated 3/4 of the CKO teams have the opportunity to win Masterpoints in another event.

So the available Masterpoints for the CKO teams includes this other event; the available Masterpoints for the Swiss team does not.

It does get complicated.
Dec. 30, 2017
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If you have a 30-table Howell, the winning pair defeated 59 competitors. With 30-table Mitchell, the winning pair defeated only 29 competitors. With a 30-table Web movement, the winning pair defeated 29 competing pairs, and all played the same 24, 26, or 27 boards. Movement type affects number of competitors.

For an overall award in a Mitchell or Web movement, you are comparing the results of pairs that played “apples” (N-S hands) vs those that played “oranges” (E-W hands), a blatantly unfair comparison.
Dec. 30, 2017
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Is there really a third-place playoff in the Under-21, and if so, are the results being posted anywhere?
Dec. 30, 2017
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Don't forget – for a 16-team (for simplicity's sake) CKO, that can be one bracket, but for a two-session event 16 teams play in the first session, but only four in the second session, for a total of 20 twelve-board matches played, a total of 240 boards. You have twelve teams sitting out or playing in some one-session event for the second session, competing for a separate Masterpoint award pool.

Compare this to a two-bracket “Bracketed Swiss” (i.e. round-robin teams) where a total for each eight-team bracket of four eight-board head-to-head matches played in each of seven rounds, for a total of 448 boards.

So more bridge is played in the Swiss context. Taking this into account, the simple answer is “it gets complicated.”
Dec. 30, 2017
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