Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Kit Woolsey
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 412 413 414 415
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I addition, assuming RHO has A9x of hearts and ducks the second heart, you can cash AK of clubs and lead a heart, which makes unless RHO has Qxx(x) of clubs.
6 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I never said that the 1NT bidder isn't allowed to think of bidding 3. I said that it is almost always best for the 1NT bidder to shut up. With your hand A I would bid 3. But it would have be as perfect as that.
6 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
There are several relevant factors. Your posting along with the comments pretty well covers them all.

The most important thing when you are 2-3 in the majors is to make up your mind what you are going to do when partner rebids 2 before you respond 1NT. This way you can make your call (whether pass or 2) in tempo, without revealing anything. With most players:

A fast pass will show a 2-card differential (either 1-3 or 2-4 in the majors).

A fast 2 will show 2-2 in the majors (or maybe 3-card support and a weak hand).

A slow pass or a slow 2 will show 2-3 in the majors.

This is very valuable information for the opponent who is considering whether or not to balance, and for the opening leader who is deciding whether or not to lead a trump.
9 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't see why. Opener has described his hand, and responder has placed the contract. Nobody invited opener to the party.

To give a more extreme example, suppose responder chose chose to bid 4 (to play) opposite a 10-12 NT holding J109xxxx xxxx xx. Whatever happens after that, opener is going to shut up – he will never raise to 5. Is that a controlled psyche?

In my mind, a psyche is a descriptive call made on a hand which doesn't come close to fitting the description. Bids such as 2 and 4 (opposite the 10-12 NT) aren't descriptive calls. These are calls which place the contract, for whatever reason the bidder chooses to make that placement.
19 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In general, no.
June 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
As is so often the case, the key to a successful slam auction is to set the trump suit as early as possible. North failed to do this with his 1NT response. He should have made some kind of heart raise immediately (depending on system), and then there would have been a decent chance to get to slam.
June 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I have played this ever since I started playing multi. Having 4M be P/C is silly.
June 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Nice construction. I have always wondered what it would be like on the hand records to have Deep Finesse be blank (i.e. nobody can make anything).
June 16
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
We don't play transfers with our 10-12 NT, so there is no super-accept. In addition, we would never raise regardless of our hand. With 10-12 NT, it is almost always best if opener shuts up unless he is invited.
June 16
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
On your second question, I believe the answer is 24

North: AQ109 AQ109 xxx xx

South: xxx xx AQ109 AQ109

East: xxxx xxxx KJ KJx

West: KJ KJx xxxx xxxx

Anything less won't work, as that would require an 11-card fit in the suit missing KQ, so there couldn't be enough length in the other suits.
June 16
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
We play 1-(1M)-3 as a transfer to 3NT. Opener bids 3NT unless he has a singleton or void in the enemy suit, in which case he bids naturally with 3M showing clubs.

This is very valuable for right-siding when responder has something like Axx in the overcaller's suit, since opener might have the queen. However, it can be used for other holdings where responder prefers to have the overcaller on lead because he judges that the overcaller will have less of an idea about what to lead than his partner.

Some pairs use 3M as a transfer to 3NT. This isn't as effective, since it gives the partner of the overcaller the opportunity to double (or not double) for the lead. Thus, when the overcaller has KJ9xx, he will know whether or not it is safe to lead his suit. With 3 being the transfer to 3NT, the opponents don't have the luxury of the free double. Also, since opener has room below 3NT to bid something else when he is short in their major, we can sometimes find a superior 5m or 6m contract. Responder's holding is likely to be Axx, so we know about the good fit.
June 16
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I believe the “standard” way of teaching players to count tricks – counting losers at suit contracts – is detrimental to learning good declarer play. It is usually okay for hand with a long trump suit, but for more complex hands such as 4-3 or 4-4 fits counting losers will often cause a player to take his eye off the ball. It is important to see what tricks really need to be taken.

When I declare a suit contract, I always count my winners. For example, suppose I am playing a 5-4 trump fit. I assume a 3-1 trump split for starters. Assuming there is some ruffing value in the short hand, I first look at what I call the “draw trumps and claim” approach. If I draw trumps, I have 6 trump tricks. Adding that to what is available in the side suits, I see if I have enough winners to make the contract. If I do, then I draw trumps and claim. If not, I look for ways to develop what is needed – perhaps ruffing two things in the short hand which gets me up to 7 trump tricks. But it is always winners, not losers, which I am counting. I want to know just which tricks I am planning on taking.

The same approach is used on defense. Count declarer's winners. If you can see that he has enough winners to make the contract, you know you need to be active to develop your tricks quickly. If you can see that he doesn't have enough winners, you know that a passive defense will succeed. This is the key to solving the common problem of whether to be active or passive on defense.

Of course losers matter also. It won't help to have 10 winners in 4 if the opponents can take 4 tricks first. If such a danger exists, you need to find a way to dispose of a loser quickly. But otherwise, your goal is to take 10 tricks, not to avoid losing 4 tricks.

Winners make contracts. Losers defeat contracts.
June 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Since it is clear that West gave the correct system explanation, that means that North had MI.

What would have North done with the correct information? Not clear, but he might well have passed. From his point of view East has to bid 2H, and the opponents could be in trouble. Bidding 3 would let them off the hook.

If North had passed, obviously East would pass, since he thinks his partner has made a value-showing bid and would have no reason to change his mind. I think we know what South would then do.

Thus, adjusting the contract to 2 redoubled, while harsh, appears to be the proper adjudication.
June 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The diamond discard is strange. Why wouldn't North discard a less revealing heart? At any rate it pretty well confirms that the king of diamonds is in he North hand, as North wouldn't be discarding a diamond without the king. It also pretty much confirms that North doesn't have 5 clubs, so there is no reason to play for a squeeze.

I can't see any justification for anything other than the obvious percentage play of hoping for a 4-3 club split (or stiff or doubleton queen).
June 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You say several? That is the only one I know of where the hesitation came after partner's unexpected call. In all the others partner's call could easily have been anticipated.

In the case you cite, that was a freak occurrence because a player had made a mistake, his partner knew that, and his partner had to try to figure out what the mistake was. Still, had the RKC bidder made a Q-bid (which he could have done) then there would have been no issue regardless of how long he took to make the Q-bid. It is the slow signoff which is the problem.
June 14
Kit Woolsey edited this comment June 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If partner has something resembling his calls (10 HCP, 5-4 in hearts and clubs), that means that:

The opponents have bid this way with about 20 HCP. That is virtually impossible. Either East isn't close to his 1NT overcall or West isn't close to his redouble.

The opponents either have at least an 8-card spade fit or at least an 11-card diamond fit, which is virtually impossible.

The opponents are vul vs. not, so while they might be stretching some they won't be screwing around.

If you gave this hand to 100 experts and asked them what they thought was going on, I am confident they would all say that partner doesn't have what he has said he has. This is just bridge logic, and South is entitled to use bridge logic.
June 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Even if East took some time at trick to plan the defense, he couldn't have possibly gone through all the analysis we have done here. Certainly he had formed a picture of declarer's likely distribution and the approximate hand. When it went jack of heats small small, he certainly knew declarer had jack-doubleton of hearts. He might have realized the potential importance of his 10 of spades if declarer had queen-doubleton. Beyond that, he was just going on instinct and experience.
June 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Now you are grasping at straws. LHO opened a strong club, partner overcalled, and RHO made a game-forcing call. 4-card support and 13 cards are sufficient to raise to at least the 2-level and disrupt the enemy auction. The king of hearts has nothing to do with his call.

If you would not overcall with the West hand and not raise with the East hand, I can tell you from years of experience that any strong club pair would love to be playing against you.
June 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Richard,

You have made it quite clear that you don't like the duck, and you are entitled to your opinion. However, assuming the duck is in tempo and a defender doesn't somehow give it away, I guarantee you that declarer will be convinced that the heart finesse is onside. He will never credit East for having ducked the heart, and if repeating the heart finesse is a plausible option to make the contract he will always choose this over something else.
June 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The problem isn't slow and fast bids in slam auctions. It is awareness of tempo-sensitive situations and preparing in advance.

For example, suppose spades are agreed and you choose to make a slam move with a 5 call. If you take a long time to make this bid, the BIT tells partner nothing. You might have been considering quitting in 4. You might have been considering an alternative move, such as RKC. You might be paving the road for a grand slam move, with a hand that will always be driving to a small slam. You could have anything.

The key is that when you bid 5, you should be prepared for partner's likely call. The most important one to be prepared for is 5. You must decide in advance whether you will sign off in 5 or do something further, and this is what you should be thinking about while pondering your 5 call. Thus, if your decision is to sign off in 5, you will be prepared to do so in tempo, and there will be no UI difficulties.
June 14
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 412 413 414 415
.

Bottom Home Top