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All comments by Larry Sealy
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Tommy Sanders, I believe.
Nov. 17, 2017
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That's basically the crux of the problem for me. If I thought my question distracted him, I'd give him a chance to take the Pass back. If not, the pass would stand. I guess I would have to be there to determine the answer.
Nov. 16, 2017
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I'll transfer, then bid 3. If partner then bids 3N, I'll try 4.
Nov. 16, 2017
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If no way to show a 2-suiter, I'd have overcalled 2. That would leave me an easy 4 now.
Nov. 15, 2017
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Do I have any way to distinguish between good and bad raises? Namely, what would 2N by partner have been?
Nov. 15, 2017
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Haven't seen you at a tourney in awhile, John.
Nov. 15, 2017
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If K lead could be from A OR K, how would you find out if your partner has the J (or even A), when you don't have the J? And if the lead could be from AK or KQ how does partner how what to do with J?
Nov. 13, 2017
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Marty,

I would double with that shape (depending on the hand), as well. But I wouldn't bid 2. I'd pass 2 and hope for the best.
Nov. 11, 2017
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All are correct, but 3 could be no shortness with 6 card sppt for minor, though rates to have shortness. I don't think I've ever bid it w/o shortness, but I can envision Kx in partner's major and 6 card support for the minor and just under a 2/1.

We can get out in 4m.
Nov. 11, 2017
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Had the 3N bid come up once in about 3 years of playing) and got to a thin, cold slam when opener had bad spades. It doesn't come up that often. Then again, needing to make a distinction between invitational bids doesn't either.

Agree with the can't do everything part. However, if you stuff the real good raises in with 2N, you could play the wrong part-score (unless you play 2N is forcing, which seems unplayable, to me). And if 3N is all unbalanced, big raises, it seems like opener could be guessing (I know the shortness is most likely opener's major, but you could be 2-1-6-4, with the shortness the key). Opener might have to guess whether to bid over 3N.
Nov. 11, 2017
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This is taking ELC to the extreme. I've never heard anyone propose using it with a 4 card suit.
Nov. 11, 2017
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Nothing's perfect. Passing risks missing a game. He certainly shouldn't have started with Dbl. And W's pass indicated a preference for over at least one other suit. He shouldn't double with this strength and a side singleton.
Nov. 11, 2017
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Yeah, I was just picking on the worst bids. The best one was still bad.
Nov. 10, 2017
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Need to know what we play. Is 1-3 inv?
Nov. 10, 2017
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a)3H b)3N
Nov. 10, 2017
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North for every bid he made. South should have bid 3, but North should have started with 2N.
Nov. 10, 2017
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John,

Some play 11s-1N-1m-3 is a big raise of the minor (similar to the impossible 2 when 1 was opened). I play this, along with a jump to 3N as a splinter in partner's major (e.g., 1-1H-2D-3N = big raise w/short s).

I certainly see merits in your approach but w/o this, how do you distinguish between a courtesy raise and a serious raise?
Nov. 10, 2017
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I was friends with Steve from the late 70s until he moved from Dalton, GA to LV. I played a little with him (and on teams with him) in the late 70s/very early 80s - also bought baseball cards from him when he owned Dalton Stamp and Coin and wasn't playing bridge much (late 80s/early 90s).

He was an excellent player and a nice guy. I'm sorry I didn't get a chance to “catch up” with him at a LV NABC before he passed away.

RIP, Stevie.
Nov. 6, 2017
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I used to play that 1st step asks shortness, 2nd step asks size (bad, avg., good). You lose 2-2 as natural. I'm not sure which is worth more, but I haven't played it lately. I usually just play 2N asks size (graded in 4 steps). With some, I play:
3 = 5 card suit, then 3D is game try
3// = bad/avg/good w/6 card suit

When the weak 2 is , 3N is the most likely game, so I've never worried about shortness nor suit length being shown in responses.
Nov. 6, 2017
Larry Sealy edited this comment Nov. 6, 2017
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I would have bid 4 last round to bring partner into the picture. If both sides have a 2-suited fit, doubling might not work well.

Having bid the nebulous 4, I'm endplayed into Dbl.
Oct. 26, 2017
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