Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Liam Milne
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
What's up JLall? Cheers for jumping in the Well!

1. Almost 9 years ago now you posted an excellent article on how to improve your bridge game (http://justinlall.com/2006/04/26/how-to-improve-your-game/). How much of your own advice have you followed? Regarding improving your mental game, what have been the biggest improvements you have made and how did you improve yourself in that area?

2. The more I play with/against top players, the more often I hear about great carding agreements to solve spots which aren't ‘standard’ or part of the textbook literature. What cool expert carding agreements can you share with us which most people won't have thought about?
Jan. 15, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Well done to Bridge24 - an excellent performance by a team of players that we will no doubt see a lot more of in the future.

I'm not sure if the second post above mine was an attempt at an apology, but complimenting 5 members of the losing team and calling them “brave fighters”, while leaving out Bessis, strikes me as classless. Bringing in irrelevant comments about the fantasy bracket while continuing to insult one of the most famous and well-liked faces of the modern bridge scene goes beyond that.

To be honest, when I first read your top post, I assumed it was intended as satire. Calling a player who just lost the Spingold final a “fish” in a public forum? I now have to assume that you don't know who Bessis is - that seems the only explanation for your comments.

Most of these achievements won't be new to those reading, but to name a few, Bessis is a two-time Vanderbilt champion, European Open and World Transnational gold medalist, and Cavendish Teams winner. In addition, he was the 2010 IBPA Personality Of The Year. From the award text, " has won an IBPA award for best-played hand by a Junior, and has proved himself to be popular, well-mannered and generous — a true renaissance man."

I can only imagine how Bessis and his teammates feel right now. But if this is the sort of person you want to abuse, then I don't know what more to say.
Aug. 12, 2013
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Side note: if South splits at Greg's table on the mid-hand trump play from dummy, declarer can't play another trump to North's king at this point - a spade comes back taking out declarer's last trump, and when South ruffs in they can cash the fourth spade.

Instead, declarer has to go back to the plan of pitching a diamond on the third club, which now works with a round of trumps gone (and South having Q8 left rather than QJ). After the AK of clubs and the A of diamonds, if North ruffs the third diamond lead, declarer can draw trumps when they're in (dummy has pitched down to 954 of trumps and a spade which gets played on North's exit card).

If North doesn't ruff, dummy ruffs and has to play a trump in the four-card ending to avoid losing 3 trump tricks. When North wins and can't draw the last trump, one of dummy's spade losers gets ruffed out on the return and the other gets pitched on an established diamond.

Cool hand!
June 30, 2013
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Hi Gavin, regarding the point you made on board 5 about how a club to the jack forcing the ace would play nicely - doesn't the same point apply to the a club to king, winning? Now you can ruff clubs until the ace of clubs falls. And there's not much danger of it falling early: if they have Axxx they can't drop it without you setting up the suit, and if they drop it from Axx they will set up a ruffing finesse against their partner.

I was surprised you didn't play a club to the king after you argued the East was likely to have more outside values than West (because of the lead-directing double), maybe you could explain this.
May 28, 2013
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ah, nice lead. Easier to find when you know declarer's hand!
April 2, 2013
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Believe it or not, West was squeezed… you can make this contract without ruffing out the diamonds or ruffing out of the clubs using the 3-3 break. Because only West guards the fourth round of diamonds, there is a compound squeeze.

Example: trump lead. After drawing trumps, South plays 2 rounds of diamonds (pitching a heart), ruffs a diamond, then runs the remainder of the trumps. In the 6-card ending, (with A6 of hearts, a diamond, and 3 clubs in dummy opposite 2 trumps, a heart and AKx of clubs in hand), declarer plays a trump and West is triple squeezed.

Obviously West cannot pitch his diamond, and whichever of clubs or hearts he chooses to unguard, it creates a double squeeze with whatever he holds on to being the double menace. If he pitches 2 clubs (dummy doing likewise) then his partner must throw a heart and now the AK of clubs squeezes West in the reds, while if West pitches hearts, then his partner is forced to hold onto the clubs and a heart to ace squeezes West in the minors at the end. Cute hand!
April 2, 2013
Liam Milne edited this comment April 2, 2013
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
.

Bottom Home Top