Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Maggie Eaton
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Last year I was struck down by something quite horrible, and although I do not play much any more, I am still part of the bridge community and never feel alone, thanks to BBO!
Thank you Fred :)
July 15
Maggie Eaton edited this comment July 15
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Also a great help to newer bridges trying to understand what is going on. If the bids have disappeared, they struggle to understand any explanations!
May 31
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BBC ran it yesterday
March 2
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As a teacher of Beginners/early Improvers in the UK, can I say how pleased and reassured my Improvers have been to discover clubs where all abilities/disabilities are welcomed.

We partnered a good friend to a top club in the county for over a year following his fall from a ladder and subsequent brain-deterioration. Unfortunately now he recognises that he is no longer able to keep up, but still so much enjoys the challenge of bridge, that at least once a week a game is played with him at his house. I am rather sad that the good county players have not offered to participate, but fortunately there are plenty of kind improvers around.
Jan. 30
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'What do you know about this business?' the King said. ‘Nothing,’ … ‘Nothing whatever?’ persisted the King. …. ‘You’re nothing but a pack of cards!'
July 6, 2018
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I would suggest you use the Stop Card upside-down here….at least, that's how I play it ;)
July 4, 2018
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I've diverted them to Junk. I can look here to find out what is going on.
July 3, 2018
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BBO Teaching area is excellent and allows plenty of flexibility. Occasionally, when we have been unable to hold a class in the usual venue, e.g. snow, I set up a table and help my adult students - often not tech-savvy - reach the table through phone contact.
Many have taken a big step forward by just arriving there!….then they can play/watch, as they wish.

Youngsters are perfectly capable of finding their own way, but seem to prefer to throw themselves into the general fray of the main club, and play regardless. I'll do this with them, and it is usually hilarious.
June 29, 2018
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My adult beginners have nearly all been recommended to me by their friends who play. They know that bidding occurs, and want to include it early.
But I certainly feel it is important to tailor the classes to the group, and proceed at a pace that suits.
A few do not wish/are unable to continue past 10 lessons. Often they come back later for more, but in the meantime, it seems to be good to give them a bidding framework with which to practise/play.

My lessons are 3 hours long: approx. half an hour for reviewing homework and questions; one hour for new topic and declaring a hand each; half an hour for refreshments and general chat/more questions; last hour for another hand each.
Most of my students drive for 30/40 minutes to reach the lesson venue, and this timing seems to give value for their efforts.
June 29, 2018
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First week is Minibridge. 2nd week: Opening 1NT with pass or NT raises. 3rd week: Opening 1NT with suit continuations (No Stayman till we recap 1NT at start of Beginners Part II = week 11) 4th week: Opening 1 of a suit with simple raises. 5th week: Opening 1 of a suit with change of suit or 1NT response. Weeks 6-9: we look at how opener rebids with various strength/shaped hands, and what responder should do next. Week 10: Overcalling.

This may seem a slow schedule, but every lesson includes discussion of why we choose certain bids, how we might play the hands, plus leading in defence.

Homework each week (for adults), but it does not matter if they do not have time to tackle it; we go through each homework page at the start of the following class.
I try to keep what they have to memorise to a bare minimum. More important that they grasp what we are trying to accomplish and give it a go.

Success can be felt in their growing enthusiasm for the game and the whole adventure :)
June 27, 2018
Maggie Eaton edited this comment June 27, 2018
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I live in the UK, in a rather sparsely populated county. I teach privately, as attempts through clubs have not been very successful, particularly as no club in the county has its own premises.
Word of mouth has been my most effective marketing method (though of course you have to get started with some students before that can happen) A group of my friends got the ball rolling about 8 years ago.

I have found it best to keep the class atmosphere informal, so that students get to know each other well, and feel they have made friends with whom to practise.

The EBU produces excellent course books for beginners and first-level improvers. The NZ site (mentioned above) provides online learning and practice opportunities, as does No Fear Bridge, and Andrew Robson on YouTube. Occasionally, I can tempt one to join me on BBO.

I try to teach each class as a team…..they are there to help each other while we learn. When we have covered a topic, say opening 2NT, with set hands, we then recap another week with them making up each opening hand and the other 3 of each board random. Each of the 3 other hands in turn is then placed face-up on the table, and everybody tries to work out how that hand would respond. The rest of the group say what they think the opener’s bids mean as we proceed, and if one doesn’t tally the opener can replace it with what we hope is better (often I recap the options). After all 3 random responder’s hands have been discussed, opener chooses one as *his/her dummy, we shuffle the other 2 and they become the opponents for playing the hand.
At the end of each deal, we put all cards face-up on the table and together try to work out how play might have been improved. Not only do we get 3 bites at each cherry, but students also come to realise that there is not always a right answer….You just do the best you can with the cards you hold.

*I say “his/her”, but in fact 75% of my students are female. Most men seem to want to do it their own way, preferably after only a few lessons. The exceptions are super: good fun, keen to learn and share, and usually with their 2nd/3rd life partner. Most women like to take things slowly and carefully. These are all intelligent people and prefer to understand why they are doing something as they proceed. If they cannot understand the logic, the same mistakes/questions occur repeatedly.

We’ll be having a 2nd+ year Improvers’ session at the home of one student this afternoon. After asking this group where they feel the holes are in their knowledge, I tailor the class material accordingly. A few are now playing at local clubs. Yes, getting students to join clubs, as opposed to playing informally at each other’s houses, is the big hurdle. Improvers need to have fun, even if their play is not good - yet. Sadly, my attempts to get the central county club to tackle this have not been successful.
Any ideas?
June 27, 2018
Maggie Eaton edited this comment June 27, 2018
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This site looks brilliant, particularly for those learning a Weak NT.
April 13, 2018
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Appears from the video that the auction in over before the screen is lifted
Feb. 22, 2018
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This confused me to begin with, then I drew it out and it became clearer, thank you.
However, I think that W and E designations may not be correct in one paragraph…I may be wrong!
Jan. 28, 2018
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I fear that if the run comes first, you may not get full tables for the bridge!
Aug. 4, 2017
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Perhaps he said “ 'kyou”, which might be misinterpreted as “king” by somebody of a different nationality?
June 23, 2017
Maggie Eaton edited this comment June 23, 2017
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For Beginners/Intermediates/Advanced bridges there are some brilliant coaching sessions on BBO, as well as short tournaments. I would think that more players fit into these categories, than expert and ‘world class’ :)
The Bidding and Teaching rooms are well set up, and easy to use.
And thanks to the many top level players who give their time to enhance our Vugraph experience with splendid written and audio commentaries.
April 24, 2017
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Very well done Eric, plus others on the top 10 list.
And thank you for giving us such great entertainment when we watch your matches on BBO.
Dec. 9, 2016
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Even for those of us who do not know him, or you, or play poker, this is a wonderful story. Thank you, and huge congratulations to Mitch.
July 3, 2016
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Thanks Roland, and all the commentators. The gallery will be full to overflowing!
June 14, 2016
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