Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Mark Bennett
1 2 3
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Thank you very much! for taking the time to do this. For those unfamiliar with GIB, these tips should prove very useful.

A very long time ago, when I was young, I played EHAA (Every Hand an Adventure).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/EHAA

The normal reaction was a far less polite version of: “Now, does this resemble bridge as we know it?”

Currently there are 6600+ playing the free BBO ACBL practice tournament–hopefully a sign of things to come for the real event.
July 1
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Great idea! Should be a lot of fun–I'm looking forward to playing.
June 14
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LHO followed small; RHO showed out when hearts originally played. LHO was originally dealt Kx; RHO stiff Q. –“I win the opening plain suit lead in hand and play the trump A, my RHO showing out and LHO following–K and Q of trump are outstanding.”
April 17
Mark Bennett edited this comment April 17
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Great post!

Happy April 1.

The only thing I can't tell is how many of the comments are serious and how many aren't.
April 1
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I was West and continued hearts at tricks two and three after a heart lead. Declarer played quickly (not overly quickly), playing four rounds of diamonds at tricks 4-7 (discarding two spades), my partner discarding one spade and one heart. Declarer then cashed the club king and without much thought (I played the club ten on the second round) finessed, making three.
Jan. 10
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Greg–I chose not to ask at the table for a number of reasons. But, I also thought posting the question here and reading the responses (including yours, which is a fair comment), was reasonable.
Jan. 10
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Sorry, misunderstood your question (I didn't read it carefully enough). North, not South, was next to the table from where the boards came.
Jan. 10
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“I'd be curious whether North or South was sitting next to the table which played the board previously, if this wan't the first round.”

Yes, and this was not the first round.
Jan. 10
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Art–thanks for your comment. Double dummy, of course, 11 tricks are there for the taking. At matchpoints, a normal line after three rounds of hearts (and four rounds of diamonds) would in my view still be taking the club finesse (though that would or could depend on the discards and the speed with which they were made).
Jan. 10
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2NT was forcing in the N/S system, according to their card (and Norths's hand).
Jan. 10
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I had not heard of the Bacon number until this thread. However, if TV counts, I have a Bacon number of 3 (based on Googling), as Alex Trebek has a Bacon number of 2, and I was a contestant on Jeopardy.

Sadly, I shall never have an Erdos number.
Dec. 12, 2016
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Thanks everyone for some great suggestions!
July 23, 2016
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Collins & Kevin–Great suggestions! Thanks very much!
July 21, 2016
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Not related to the other Bennetts, though I very much enjoyed reading the book “The Devil's Tickets.”

And perhaps having spent much of my career as a prosecutor, including prosecuting many murder cases, causes me to believe the comparison is not apt.

Nonetheless, I believe that permanent expulsion (or perhaps expulsion that allows a right to reapply after 20 years) is clearly appropriate for collusive cheating (and other types of cheating).

.
June 9, 2016
Mark Bennett edited this comment June 9, 2016
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Michael H.–I, like your mentor, throw up the first morning of every trial (well over 100 now). I thought I didn't for appellate arguments, and then proceeded to for my two SCOTUS arguments. Just part of life for me :).

Sabrina–Best of luck in Denver–rooting for you to do great!
Dec. 1, 2015
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Nick–If it really deserves its own name, I have a modest proposal, as a Hawaii resident for 35 or so years.

In our local patois (or pidgin as it's called in Hawaii) lolo means foolish (or worse), as in “what a lolo thing to do,” or "he's so lolo.“

http://localhawaiiexperience.weebly.com/pidgin-language.html

So picking up on David Burn's theme that the squeeze is rare because a competent declarer can usually avoid it: the ”Lolo Squeeze."
Nov. 17, 2015
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David–You write: “But the real reason it is a rare phenomenon is that it almost always requires declarer to have messed up the entries earlier in the play.” Although I don't think I know you, you seem to be very familiar with my declarer play!
Nov. 16, 2015
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Sensible to play 3 as game-forcing.

Thanks!

My hand was:

K J 4
8
7 4
K Q 7 6 4 3 2
Nov. 9, 2015
1 2 3
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