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All comments by Nick Krnjevic
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Hanan;

First, permit me to congratulate you on the remarkable effort you have made to dispassionately respond to the extraordinary volume of posts that your thread has generated.

Secondly, unfortunately, a substantial number of the more recent posts, particularly those emanating from a very small minority of the most frequent posters, reflect what the French aptly refer to as a “dialogue des sourds” (dialogue between the deaf).

Thirdly, given that this very small but vocal minority does not make the effort to reasonably assess the merits of both sides of the argument, it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that your well-meaning efforts at further persuasion are, unfortunately, a counter-productive troll-feeding exercise that simply generates more heat and less light.
July 10, 2013
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Roy - I look forward with keen interest to reading your views on why the host of a WBF event would, over a period of months, ignore multiple requests for security information.
July 6, 2013
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Jonathan - I must confess to having some difficulty seeing how your reply addresses the issue of why the Indonesians have refused to respond to a request for information pertaining to security.

And let's consider that failure to respond in the question format that you have chosen to adopt: to paraphrase your approach, I am curious how people would answer the following question:

were you responsible for hosting a WBF event would you studiously ignore multiple requests for information about security from a participant whose international representatives have been the object of past terrorist attacks and plots?

I would also respectfully suggest that the question you have posed misses the point. A more appropriate question would be the following:

If you thought your team was exposed to a potential security risk at an international event, would you ask the host for information about security in order that you could make an informed decision as to a) should the team attend, and b) what additional security measures, if any, may be required?

You might also have added the following query:

Would you expect the host country to studiously ignore your multiple requests for months on end?









July 5, 2013
Nick Krnjevic edited this comment July 6, 2013
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Jonathan - with all due respect, I think you have this ass-backwards.

Mr. Rona's comments are remarkably condescending.

The Israelis have reasonable grounds to communicate with the Indonesians to obtain information with respect to security procedures.

The Israelis state that over a period of months the Indonesians have ignored multiple requests to discuss security issues with them. Neither the Indonesians nor the WBF have denied the Israelis' contention.

The Indonesians' failure to respond to multiple requests to discuss security matters in these circumstances is entirely inconsistent with the reasonable, good faith conduct expected of a host of a WBF event.

Given that neither the Indonesians or the WBF have disputed the Israelis' version of events, Mr. Rona's bald assertion that “knowing our Indonesian friends I am sure that they did everything was necessary to assure the participation and the security of the Israel representative, as all the other representatives, in Bali”, is singularly inadequate.

In short, as Mr. Sher accurately states, Mr. Rona has decided that the message “trust me” is sufficient response to the Israelis' legitimate complaint.

With all due respect to Mr. Rona, it is difficult to conceive of a more condescending, and unsatisfactory, reply.
July 5, 2013
Nick Krnjevic edited this comment July 6, 2013
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Hard to see how South can be assigned any share of the blame: given that South has shown a 4-bagger trump suit and a minimum with his previous bidding he has the best possible hand for the auction.

North's bidding looks more than a little suspect - South wouldn't have signed off in 3NT with the great bulk of the hands North needs him to have to make slam a good proposition.
June 16, 2013
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I think Seymon D. came second in ‘92 ( to a strong French team) in harness with Rosenberg, who psyched on the first board if I recall correctly, testing a pet theory.

He won the ’88 Olympiad with Meckwell and the Texans against an Austrian team that had made its mark in more ways than one in the '85 BB.
June 15, 2013
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Kit - congratulations on both a first-class article and a very impressive system. I suspect that you face hyperactive interference from the opponents when they are at favorable vulnerability. Do you play the same system at all colours, or, like some big-clubbers, have you found that it may be preferable to change methods when red v white?
May 8, 2013
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I'm with Aviv, but recognize that my perception of courtesy may well be different from that held by others.

Perhaps this issue should be the object of a separate thread and a poll.
April 27, 2013
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Bobby - I suspect the *number* of first class international opponents that US teams/pairs have faced in the past 15 years is likely substantially greater than the number faced by the preceding generation of US teams/pairs.

Consequently, ‘ability to win very high-level titles’ seems to be an awkward tool to use to compare the ability of the relevant post-1976 generations of US bridge players since the fewer current US teams/pairs winning world-class titles may well reflect the rest of the world catching up rather than the US declining.



April 27, 2013
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Jan - being Canadian, my interest in this thread is purely academic; however, after reading the various posts, I must confess to being in awe of both the scope and duration of the astonishing effort you have put into the ITT.

A fellow Canadian, Mike Myers, could easily have been referring to you when he popularized the phrase “we are not worthy….”
April 24, 2013
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If you think the bulk of the field is playing a strong no-trump then playing the Ace immediately seems right.

Assuming the lead was 4th best, West has a decent 5 card spade suit). If he also has the K of diamonds he will likely bid 1(or more) spades at many tables. No-trump will be played by North, and most declarers will play West to have the diamond K on the auction (particularly if West, as is likely, plays the Q or K of spades at trick 1).

And if West does not have the KD, and passes, there is a good chance East would not have lead a spade from a 3 card suit against a 1C-3NT auction. And if he did lead a spade because the suit is 4-4 the finesse is always right.

So it seems your best play to cater to what happened at the majority of the other tables is to win the Ace and try and grab all your tricks.
April 9, 2013
Nick Krnjevic edited this comment April 9, 2013
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John - to make this truly meaningful I think you also need to find out the current age of each responder.

How to get that info is a whole separate issue :-)
April 7, 2013
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Steve - would it be fair to say that your analysis suggests (amongst other things) that we should be looking for as many ways as possible to show 2 suited hands, regardless of strength? For example, would we be better positioned in competitive auctions if we replaced our single-suiter weak 2 bids with, e.g., Dutch-style Muiderberg 2 bids showing a weak major-minor hand (5 in the bid suit and 4+ in a minor), and adopt Wagner (the always weak version of Multi) for single-suited major suit preempts?
March 29, 2013
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Sorry Neill - the link (now corrected) should have read as follows:

http://www.webridge.fr/91/Infos_Magazine/Interviews/j-r_vernes.htm
March 13, 2013
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Vernes seems to have spent over a decade fine-tuning his theory.

In an interview given to Webridge in September 2000, Vernes explained that while he began thinking about total trick theory in 1955, and made reference to same in articles published as of 1958, it was not until 1966 that he committed “the Law” to print in its current form.

Vernes identifies Jean-Marc Roudinesco, Jean Besse and Jose Le Dentu as early disciples who supported and popularized his theory.

The French-language interview can be found here:

http://www.webridge.fr/91/Infos_Magazine/Interviews/j-r_vernes.htm

March 13, 2013
Nick Krnjevic edited this comment March 13, 2013
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Nice D play at trick 5.

Table action seems to strongly favor ruffing high.

Given your description of the opps, I doubt RHO expected you to play as you did.

So while I cheerfully expect that RHO, holding T8xx of trumps, won't have much trouble working out to pitch a heart, I'd be very surprised if he can do so without a mild break tempo.



March 6, 2013
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Kit - I'd be interested to hear how often you believe a partnership could do this before an alertable partnership agreement will be deemed to exist.

For what's it worth, my sense is that the answer should be ‘a very small handful’ otherwise we're starting to wander down a rather slippery slope.
Feb. 19, 2013
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About 15 years ago what was then Canada's most effective partnership, Mark Molson (“Moon”) and Boris Baran (“Bo”), bid efficiently to a small slam in clubs over which their opponents took a save in their 13 card-fit.

When Bo made a forcing pass, implying 1st round control in the opponents' suit, Moon bid the cold 7 clubs, only to see the opponents save at the seven level.

At this point the rot set in.

Holding a void in the opps. suit, Moon not unreasonably decided that Bo's forcing pass was based on the ace of that suit, so he shot out 7 no-trump which was smartly doubled.

Eager to grab their seven cashing tricks, the opponents serendipitously led out of turn, which momentarily transformed +2000 into -2930 since declarer had 13 tricks in the side-suits.

Unfortunately for Canada's finest, before Moon could bar the led suit, Bo tabled his hand as the dummy, thereby ratifying the opening lead.

The title of the next day's bulletin was “Molson Brews While Baran Stews”……
Feb. 10, 2013
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Hi Fred - 3 questions:

a) do you cut back on consumption of the grape at tournaments?

b) 700+ pages of system can be daunting - do you occasionally suffer from ‘fear of system’ such that you'll make a practical leap to the likely contract rather than torture partner with a particularly byzantine and infrequently used sequence (perhaps the answer to this is related to question ‘a’), and does Kit also adopt a practical approach (mind you, given the nature of the autopsies he prepares for your benefit I suspect he looks forward with keen anticipation to testing pard's knowledge of system)?

c) what stakes were in issue in the “Liz bet” that impelled such an expenditure of imagination/effort?


Jan. 17, 2013
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Michael - unless I have misunderstood your point (a distinct possibility)it seems that Bobby's sequence should generally guarantee a high diamond honor - most likely a doubleton - else there is no point to keeping 3NT in play opposite a hand that bid 3D (denying solid diamonds).

This is an interesting inference since SW seems to have drawn precisely the contrary conclusion.

This is also yet another example of why this game is so challenging.
Jan. 9, 2013
Nick Krnjevic edited this comment Jan. 9, 2013
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