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All comments by Norman Selway
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Peter, we forgot the lovliest man ever to play at SJW. Issie Solomons whose funeral I remember going to. Wonderful, patient, kind man.
April 19, 2018
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Brian Mervis created quite a stir when he came from South Africa to England in I think the seventies. He came over with compatriot Gus Caulderwood, a fine player, known for his deliberate approach to the game. Brian was the opposite, full of agression and flair, he exploded like a bomb onto the scene. Thankfully, when you played against him, his style always meant that you were in with a chance. He died of a brain tumour, I believe, I do not know the exact date but he was not very old at all when it happened. A great character.
April 19, 2018
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I once played in the London pairs with Dorothy, she was a devotee of Kenneth Konstam, both at rubber and at pairs (although I suspect that this was her only venture into the duplicate world).
She played 13-15 NT, strong twos and 5 card spades and when you partnered her, you did the same! She was a dear old thing whose husband spent the bulk of his time huntin, shootin and fishin on the family estate in Scotland. He had no interest in bridge other than it kept Dorothy occupied and in London.
April 19, 2018
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The two Patsys, Walvish, and Alberquerque although she was more old Acol Bridge Club before Linda Palmer and Adrienne Jaffe (Edwin)left to found St Johns Wood.
April 19, 2018
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Fantastic Peter, I remember them all and fondly too.
April 18, 2018
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Sorry, three tricks.
April 18, 2018
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In these rubber bridge days of yore, even quite poor players knew how the wheels went round and ethics was a county adjacent to Kent. In these games, awareness of what was going on at the table, table presence it is called, was as important as technical skill any day of the week. The poorer, but vastly experienced players would take advantage of every nuance at the table and would bid on pauses and use them for their own ends with impunity. Here is a suit combination I had to deal with thirty years ago, against two top rubber bridge exponents, who used whatever means they had to, and if I gave their names, most people would recognise them immediately. Very simple - KQ109 (dummy) opposite XXX with multilple entries. You obviously start with a low card to the K. On this LHO glances at dummy for the merest second and the K wins with RHO playing low smothly. You return to hand and play towards dummy again. LHO gives this an imperceptible look and plays small. Your go. Any difference if you are playing against two totally ethical players?
April 18, 2018
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I remember them all and particularly Ernest. He owned an estate in Scotland and wore a monocle which he adjusted every other second. He would sit at the table, beaming, and lean over to say,in a cultured accent, “My No Trumps may be a little suspect at partscore partner”. I'II say! It was compulsory for him to open 1NT at his turn with a partscore, either side, whatever his distribution or points. He was very, very dangerous and did not play the cards at all well. If you got on the wrong side of this seemingly genial man, he would extend his proclivities to opening 1NT at any score and redoubling the result! Those times at ST Johns Wood Bridge club and the many, many characters will stay with me until I die. I would not have missed them for the world!
April 17, 2018
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I remember David very well, God rest his soul, and from memory, you got off very lightly, but as you say, what goes round, comes round!
April 16, 2018
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No, not dear old Arnold.
April 16, 2018
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I remember at rubber bridge in a high powered game in the early seventys, a spectator pointed out after the hand had finished, . that my partner had revoked in a small slam. The opposition of course wanted their two tricks, resulting in one down, and my partner was furious at the interference. The host who was also the club owner awarded the points for the slam to us (nothing under the line) and plus 100 to the opposition. The kibitzer paid for both sides under threat of losing his membership. Happy days!
April 16, 2018
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I think the thread died, not because all was said and done, but, because it got so terribly slow!
April 4, 2018
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Wow! We would not get away with this type of story in Merrie England. The people wold be wailing about misogyn and stereotyping women. Good old US of A, and you have Me Too as well!
March 30, 2018
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Does that clash with Surfers?
March 30, 2018
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I believe that if it was Norman De Vere Hart, who later went om to write several books and become a renowned rubber bridge player, then he was, if not a much stronger player than Capt. Munday, certainly a much more highly regarded one.
March 29, 2018
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Your point is?
March 29, 2018
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Well done to Richard for making the 1000th post.
March 27, 2018
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Quite.
March 27, 2018
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Sorry Richard, I intended it to mean that I strongly identify with David's sentiments and applaud the way in which he has made them.
March 27, 2018
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I completely understand your frustration at the tone of several comments on this thread. But, many constructive ideas have come out of it that would not otherwise have seen the light of day .For many, Bridgewinners is more of a release more than a forum, a place to air their views in full face of their peers and the very people on the EBU who have the power to listen and change things. There is nowhere else that compares. If the criticism is unfair, the views are probably sincerely held and in turn criticised and countered by other posters on this site. If the criticism is fair, it may sting, but it should be taken into account and acted on. If the comments are vitriolic or personal then please credit the Bridgewinners community with the intelligence to recognise and denegrate them and to put the miscreants straight. One of my own posts was called repugnant by its target, but that did not alter the fact that it was my sincerely held belief and that I had, as every poster does, laid myself open to public criticism from my peers and those I respect.

When everybody has posted all they want and all is said and done, the EBU will be left with a plethora of ideas and opinions that if trawled correctly can only assist the EBU in their future work.

Then the value of discussions like this will hopefully become apparent.
March 27, 2018
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