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All comments by Norman Selway
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There is.
June 21
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Sorry Randy, but, “Fudge off?”, is this an American saying? I am sure that whatever it is it is meant to be not nice. It reminds me of when our then opposition Chancellor, Dennis Healey had a spat in Parliament with the Hon. Geoffrey Howe, the actual Chancellor and a quiet measured man. Geoffrey got his hackles up and, “went for him”, quite out of character. Dennis came out with a quote that I think everyone of my generation in this country would recognise, “It was like being savaged by a dead sheep”. Sort of sums up what I feel about , “Fudge”, and Bobby Levin.
June 21
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Justin, I believe that I have played against you once or twice, I think that the last time may have been in Canberra or perhaps Orlando. You are a really impressive player and in the prime of your life. Just let this be a temporary depression and remember all of the joy and excitement that you have had from the game….and all of the Kudos. You are in a privelidged position, you are a top player in a country that venerates top players. What would you have been without bridge? A success I imagine, but the national, or world wide celebrity that you presently are? Please rethink, and give more credit to your fellow players - they are mostly fine people all trying their best.
June 21
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Wow! I know the protagonists here very well and I think that this could cost Neeraj a fair amount of money. I hope that sane heads prevail but will be looking to see.
June 21
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To take offence you have to give a sh@t what somebody says. Believe me, you are quite safe!
June 21
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Has he? Obviously if he has it has not assauged his woes, and the overall tone was of someone who was sick to the stomach of all the rotten cheats that he had to play against. Wasted his life he said, not playing anymore he said. I am sure that given his justification he could give instances if not names. Or he could just wail, “Woe is me” and blame the world.
June 21
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I believe that you have to be either at least 103 or a close friend of the government to be Knighted in this country. Us bridge players rarely get a look in.
June 21
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Neeraj, this was not the way to go. I am surprised that you would approach what you think has transpiredin this fashion. It is not a joke. Good luck with the fallout.
June 21
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To Justin, normally my posts give offence, with you it seems that now you are the offensive one. “Straight shooter”, or no, you seem to be tarring the entire bridge world with your cheating brush. I came up through rubber bridge and played in many pretty unsavoury games with many players, who went on, or did already, represent their countries, so I know when something is not right at the table. Over my 50 years of play I have won most competitions in this country, played for England a few times and been all over the world (including your own fair country) with reasonable success. In that time, I have suspected a few times, been fairly certain once or twice, but over that long period I have found my fellow players to be a pretty reasonable bunch. Not rotten to the core as you seem to think. If you are so certain that the people that you play against are rabid cheats that make you sick to the stomach to the extent that you want to give up the game, name names, give examples. If you cannot do that, then, goodbye, good riddance, adios, but don't you dare rail at the bridge playing public like a dog baying at the moon in a game that you have made more than just a few dollars at.
June 21
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You left out AKQ, XXX, XXX, XXXX
June 17
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The guy wanted to put up a hand for discussion and is obviously not an expert in BBO. Cut him some slack, or maybe lose him.
June 16
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Is it not important at some stage to play JC? You colonials are fond of stating, “If he does not cover, then he does not have it.” surely this is better than merely cashing the Ace, so , if the Hearts look 4-4, simples, if they look 5-3 then exit with a Heart (not for me) and get that damn well JC on the table at some stage. And, yawn, I do know that you can go down with KC onside, but so do other suggested lines.
June 16
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I seem to remember recently opening 1NT (15-17) with 7 solid clubs and a bullet third in hand. My oppo, a very strong pair, missed their 4S contract and we had a laugh about it afterwards. In my time at the rubber bridge table, players like Collings or Amesbury would be bemused that this is even a topic for discussion, when the oppo open 3C and you have AKQJXX of the suit (ala Zia, 30 years ago) and a good hand, then you might understand that psyches are an art form in themselves, but competition players just do not truly understand the possible sublety involved with them, and nor, apparently, do they want to.
June 16
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Take your word for it Ed, but MH was a very small man,
June 14
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I understand. sorry if I misunderstood.
June 14
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There are many , “Professionals”, of many different ranks in this country and it is not surprising that the most successful teams over here, with one or two notable exceptions, are sponsored teams. I have, and do, play on sponsored teams, and if I did not, I would find it difficult to find top class team mates to enter with. Playing as a pro is not, to the majority of modern experts, all about the money, most experts are not actually on their uppers, it is more about putting themselves in a better position to compete. The ill judged comment upthread that it makes cheating more likely is debateable. Every other thread on this site is about hesitations and ethics and decrying the morals of the average and poorer player. Do they all play for money? What about the recent Friedland episode? How much money was at stake there? In my own country there are many, many examples of players, “bending the rules” in pursuit of small numbers of masterpoints or just to look good with their peers, certainly no money involved! To say that professionalism promotes bad behaviour ignores the torrent of threads, especially recently about the bad behaviour that the, “normal”, player encounters on an apparent everyday basis from their peers. How much money is up for grabs there? I realise that Mats is relating his own experiences, but sanctimonious? Just a bit!
June 14
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I was, as usual it was about JL and Richard was giving it large, Malcom was one of the few who was smaller in stature than little Richard, AKA the Poison Dwarf, and when he went for Malcom, Malcom used a knuckleduster (which he always denied), and broke Richard's jaw. Bridge players? More like Peyton Place.
June 14
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I think, that compared with the rubber bridge I have played in my life, that you duplicate Wallahs have a serene existence. The clubs were like bear pits then with everyone trying to get over on everyone else. My favourite memory is, after being berated on every hand by a poor but very vocal player, of tearing off the tiniest corner of his scoresheet and asking him to write all that he knew about bridge on it and his full name and address underneath it so that I could pin it to the club notice board to give everyone else the benefit of his wisdom. Challenge matches were rife and physical confrontation was not rare. One morning at the Acol Bridge Club, many moons ago there was even the spectacle of one player, who was to become a many time English and Asian international chasing a player around the table with a meat cleaver that he borrowed from the kitchen. Every day was an adventure and so, in the immortal words of the four Yorkshiremen, “Players today? They don't know they're born!”
June 12
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I used to teach a group of Nigerian diplomats in a penthouse overlooking Hyde Park and they had a real aptitude for the game. They said that they were expected to learn so as to be able to play socially, but, other than that, cards had no interest in their lives or much in their culture which was very much sport oriented.
June 11
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Talking about attracting people into the game, and given the prevailing political mood, would now be a good time to point out that at least in the UK, it is rare to see a black face at a bridge tournament? Many Indian, Pakistanis and Chinese but unless I count a dear man called Ernest, I have rarely come up against a black person at the bridge table. The situation may be different in the USA, but why the vast disparity, and what, if anything can be done to address it?
June 11
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