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All comments by Oren Kriegel
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Max,

Yes I think that's logical too, and I think an expert would interpret it that way. There might be some disagreement about whether it shows exactly the queen or if it could be shortness (and what about a stiff?).
Nov. 13
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Flags are different than switches. Flags are sets of bids that set trump without actually bidding the suit. When you flag, you don't have a different way to bid the flag suit. An example would be:

2NT - 3
3 - 3 = 5-5 majors, slam-try
?

Now 4 flags hearts and 4 flags spades. But 4 and 4 are natural, with weaker hands.

Switches are just what they sound like—you show one suit by bidding the other and vice versa.

What Dave is talking about is scrambling the order of suits, which is a more sophisticated version of switching, but still not the same as flagging.
Nov. 13
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“I'm delighted to learn that it appears to be mainstream, even if not BWS, if playing control bids.”

What does playing “control bids”—by which I assume you mean playing control-showing responses to 2—have to do with anything?
Nov. 13
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Yes, South should bid a grand over 6, but the biggest issue in my mind is that South bid a nonforcing 4 with a slam-drive.
Nov. 12
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Funny, I thought a keycard ask asked for keycards, not “controls.”
Nov. 11
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I would not play to the next trick if a defender seemed to still be on the last one. If he hadn't quitted his card completely, I would allow him to see the trick, whether my LHO had played to the next trick or not.

Edit: I abstained because he probably “can't” see the trick as a matter of law but that makes little difference to me.
Nov. 10
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That's how Rubens plays it? Is that written somewhere? Everything I recall reading by him on the subject* suggests that he thinks a responsive double after (1) X (2) is ambiguous to heart length. (He has suggested ways for opener to show 3/4/5 hearts, but that's not the same thing.)

*See, for example, October 2001 MSC Problem D. There is a related area covered in February 2014 D.
Nov. 9
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We do have six hearts over here. Those might be worth a trick or two.
Nov. 9
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South has strong slam interest, not mild. I would be happy to be playing nonserious 3NT here so I could make a serious cue.
Nov. 9
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At least three “very”s are warranted. I might go for more
Nov. 4
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I didn't say opening 2 with my example hand would be good bridge (it wouldn't), just that many players would do it.
Nov. 2
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Right. I don't care at all about hearing if the opponents are playing Precision before starting the round, but I very much think 4-card majors should be pre-alerted (in the US; I know that would be unnecessary in some countries).
Nov. 2
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If you changed the J to the K, plenty of players would count 8.5 tricks and open a standard 2.
Nov. 2
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I was playing with a student last week, and a recurring lesson was that balanced hands should usually pass over 1NT. (We didn't have a penalty double of a strong notrump available.)

In a pair game, my partner picked up a 5-3-3-2 16-count with KQJ10x and showed long diamonds over her RHO's 1NT with no one vul. She reached 2 and scored +110 but she would have done better to pass and defend 1NT for +150 or +200.

The next day, in the last round, she picked up a similar hand with KQ10xx. Her RHO, a pro, opened 1NT on an offbeat hand (4=4=1=4 with stiff J), vul against not. My partner passed, and dummy tabled a true Yarborough. We got 200 and a great score.

Your actual hand seems like an automatic pass of a vulnerable 1NT. If the opponents are NV, there's more upside to bidding, but I'm still a passer. Coming in with 5-3-3-2 seldom seems to work.
Nov. 1
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Your choices leave something to be desired. Saying you always/usually/sometimes/seldom open 1NT with a 5-card major does not mean that you never/won't/might/will open 1M with this hand. I'm in the (almost) always 1NT camp, but this looks like a clear 1NT even for the fence-sitters. Try, say, KQ10xx xx Axx AQx to get a better sense.
Oct. 25
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Thanks, fixed.
Oct. 22
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Thanks, fixed.
Oct. 22
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2, forcing 2? Maybe I'm going to miss the best fit, but hopefully 2 won't get pounded, and I'll be able to scramble a few tricks.
Oct. 21
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It certainly could be 0 HCP, but it depends on the vulnerability. I might respond to 1 with a yarb and only a 4-card major, but likely only if I were non-vul. Vul, I might have a 5-card major and a (virtual) yarb. But in the heat of battle, who knows?
Oct. 21
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When I've played second and fourth, I literally played second and fourth. You play the second-highest or fourth-highest card back.

I know that's not what they do in Poland—I never said it was.
Oct. 20
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