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All comments by Richard Bellerose
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The sad part of the story is that those who attacked Mariusz PuczyńSki have felt no need to apologize.
May 16, 2019
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Jeff's article is spot on to what we in San Francisco have learned in over ten years of teaching school children bridge. In fact, the suggestion that dummy should participate in the play is both brilliant and obvious (or should have been, insert embarrassment emoji here). Thanks Jeff for the great article. I am going to copy it for our teachers—coaches.

I am with a volunteer nonprofit, The Center for Bridge Education, that has been teaching bridge for 11 years. We have developed a game we call Handz, where the players write on individual “fact sheets” their distribution and hcp. From there, they learn the rules in levels—rules before bidding because bidding is conventional and can be confusing if mixed in with the rules and scoring. We sell a boxed copy of the game at our cost. The details of the game are fully recorded on our web site:
center4bridge.org/handz
All materials are included in PDFs for personal use, but not for resale.

We have a weekly class of children (typically 5 or more tables) that has met every Saturday afternoon for the past year. In July, we provided financial assistance to seven children (ages 8 to 14) to attend the NABC Youth Games in Atlanta. Five got photos in the Daily Bulletin for first place showings. They are now really hooked!

Handz has taught us that we should just let the kids play. We give a brief (10 minute max) lesson each week, but we keep that simple. Many children ask for a “coach” to look at their hand and advise, which we happily do. But if they don't ask we stay out of the way.

Keeping the game simple is what keeps players returning week after week. (And the M&Ms help, too.) In addition to our weekly game, we sponsor clubs in a half dozen schools. By having a simple way to introduce the game, our reliance on master bridge players is practically eliminated. In fact, as Jeff's article implies, bridge players can “know too much.”

The Center for Bridge has been developing an app for learning bridge using the Handz method. It is particularly well-suited to computer play because there is so little reading required to move from level to level, at the players' pace. We would like to move this project along as open-source software if we can find interested programmers.
Aug. 13, 2018
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The Center for Bridge in San Francisco has several dozen kids learning bridge. We use a game that we developed especially for teaching and it has proven effective in keeping interest high and getting players up to speed. We have had some kids start as young as 6. Most are in middle school.

Our players would be quite happy to compete online, which we could arrange from our club on Saturday afternoons at 4:00 PST.
Feb. 15, 2018
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Given that South was willing to let us play 2 undoubled and North felt the same about 4, 5 has be a sacrifice. I would expect partner to treat my pass as forcing because of the opponent's bidding, not because the auction insists on it. I would not pass in the East seat.

The question and bid box are a little puzzling, given that my bid has been made.
Nov. 5, 2017
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NF. How can we know East's bid without East's hand?
Sept. 14, 2017
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The San Francisco-based Center for Bridge Education (CBE), a 501©3 nonprofit, is in the process of publishing a game that teaches bridge without requiring a bridge teacher. It is used in several middle and high schools both in California and across the country. It is CBE's mission to support school programs wherever possible. Several past students have achieved national awards.

The organization is currently seeking opportunities to expand the program's reach to both primary and secondary schools.
center4bridge.org/handz
Those interested should leave a comment on the CBE web site.
March 19, 2017
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I wish the link still worked. I'd like to know what the additional fee is. I did not see it specifically mentioned in the skimming I did.

Curious though, did the ACBL deliberately break the link?
Dec. 16, 2016
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I probably opened the hand 1H, so I will take the blame if 3S leads us to a poor result. I'd rather pass in first seat than open this 2H.
Oct. 20, 2016
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Good point, but I would not want to make that bid if partner might suspect and the opponents not. Had it not been discussed among my friends, I'd feel different.
Sept. 9, 2015
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I was surprised to discover that here and elsewhere, better players than I reserved this X for penalty, though it does not strike me as a likely non-fit auction. I expect partner to pull the 1m call without 3-card tolerance. Normally, I do not rebid a minor without 6, so in most cases, we would be doubled in a 9-card fit. The question is somewhat academic because my 2 bid was a 4-card psych, but having discussed it with many partners since, it would be unethical for me to do it again.

I asked the question because it seems that on this auction, the opposition is quite likely to have both an 8-card and a 7-card major fit and without a double to show two 4-card majors, it seems easy to miss the best spot.

Knowing that most handle this as penalty, I am far more apt to bid 3 holding 6-7 and let lefty figure out what to do.
Sept. 8, 2015
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While I think that opening this 1NT might be quite effective, it seems to be outside the published guidelines of the ACBL. If you or partner regularly open 1NT with a stiff king, it seems questionably ethical not to pre-alert that practice.
May 19, 2015
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If 3 is stronger than 4, as is my agreement with most, then I am happy to ask partner to stop bidding.
May 12, 2015
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I am uncertain why it is presumed that using a SmartPhone exchanges a credit card number. There are alternate ways to pay with apps like Google or PayPal. This could be useful for juniors who could register their name for discount before the tournament.
July 22, 2014
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LOL I frequently do.
Oct. 14, 2013
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Defending looks right to those polled. This is a more interesting lead problem. Anyone agree with a heart honor?
Oct. 13, 2013
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I have no problem with either club bid, but holding only 10 points, I assume partner is missing something. Perhaps it is a minor suit ace. If pass is wrong, then 6NT is definitely wrong. No 7C for me. When 7C makes, 6N is going to be a decent result at a club game.
Oct. 13, 2013
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I'm happy to bid 2H. If we have a 4-4 spade fit, the suit will break badly. I do not like bidding above 2 of partner's suit with a weak hand; it discourages too many reopening Xs. If they win the auction, I want a heart lead, not a spade.
Oct. 12, 2013
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It seems implausible that the ops have an 8-card spade fit. Both have had the chance to check. So I give partner 4-3-1-5 or 4-3-0-6. My 7 points are all in our suits. For partner to risk the 3 level on a possible 4-3 fit, I expect extras. I bid game, maximal on or not.
Sept. 21, 2013
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Doubling 1 in balancing seat did not promise 20. Raising 3 to game suggests extras and at least 4 hearts. Partner is better placed than I to know whether to sit or go on. He must have points somewhere, but not so prime that he could help me with 5m. Partner does not need to double with spade shortness. Isn't pass forcing?
I concede that the choice between pass and 5 has more to do with my blood sugar level than reason.
Sept. 21, 2013
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