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All comments by Richard Willey
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This seems unnecessarily complicated.

How about the following

Welland and Auken give their medals to Bach + Cornell and vice versa.

We all ignore whatever the WBF has to say. It's not like their opinion matters that much… (Arguably, making sure that the WBF understands this is of primary importance)
Sept. 28, 2016
Richard Willey edited this comment Sept. 28, 2016
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> Or….instead of throwing our hands up
> in the air and saying pair contests are
> unfair and that's just the way it is,
> and shuttling everyone who is uncomfortable
> with that to team events, perhaps we
> can recognize that they are unfair
> and score the N/S and E/W fields separately.

While we're at it, we better abolish overall awards as well. It surely can't be fair to award masterpoints based on pairs that you didn't compete against.
Sept. 27, 2016
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> I repeat a question I have asked before. Why is it only
> European pairs who were exposed for cheating?
> Boye, you are a European and I doubt if anyone thinks
> your ethics are suspect. Can you explain it?

I can't speak for Boye, I will say the following: When I cheat, I'm not stupid enough to do so using methods that show up on video. Back in the bad old days, I was forced to use a bluetooth transmitter in my shoe. Starting a couple years back, it became practical to crack the ACBL's hand generators in real time so now I can just look at boards during a bathroom break.

So, its not that American's are any more honest, rather, we're a lot better at cheating…
Sept. 26, 2016
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In my simplistic view of the world, I would define a “transfer” as a bid that shows an agreed upon length in a known suit with a minimum of 4 cards in that suit. I think that there is some inference that the bid being shown is either one or two steps above the suit being bid.

I would contrast a “transfer” with a “puppet” which requires partner to bid the next higher suit, but does not necessarily promise length in that suit.
Sept. 25, 2016
Richard Willey edited this comment Sept. 26, 2016
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Really like this last suggestion
Sept. 25, 2016
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Of course, an easier method is simply migrating to an electronic playing environment
Sept. 25, 2016
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I was more thinking of a system that would look at a table of scores and try to infer whether there was a scoring error
Sept. 25, 2016
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From my perspective, an algorithm to look for scoring anomalies is the sort of this that is amenable to a neural network or some kind of pattern recognition system…
Sept. 25, 2016
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> You will a) be met with a lot of hostility,
> and b) laughed off the club and/or tournament.

No offense Mike, but I think that Tim and Adam are playing in different games than you…
Sept. 25, 2016
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> The problem here is that the opponents' methods and
> personalities/styles are not independent.

If anything, this would make things easier, not harder.

At the end of the day, I can cite chapter and verse explaining why my position is consistent with the regulations. If you don't like this, take it up with the folks writing said laws…
Sept. 25, 2016
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I hope that the following is definitive:

The ACBL GCC specifically states that the regulations in the ACBL Alert Pamphlet are considered binding.

Here is the precise quote, taken from http://web2.acbl.org/documentLibrary/play/Convention-Chart.pdf

“Conventional agreements permitted by the ACBL Convention Charts are subject to the regulations documented in the ACBL Alert Pamphlet. For a complete list of definitions see Alert Pamphlet-Definitions.”

In turn, the ACBL's Alert Proceedures specifically state the following http://web2.acbl.org/documentLibrary/play/AlertProcedures.pdf

“Note: It is not legal to vary your system during a session for subjective reasons, such as the skill level of the opponents which you happen to be playing at the time or which member of the partnership is making the call. You may, of course, alter your defenses in response to the opponents’ methods.”
Sept. 25, 2016
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My understanding is that you can not change your agreements within a round.

You are stuck with one set of methods for a session of MPs or a round of Swiss.

However, you are allowed to apply judgement (and you can certainly change your defense based on on what seat folks are opening, the vulnerability, that sort of thing)
Sept. 25, 2016
Richard Willey edited this comment Sept. 25, 2016
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Knowing the ACBL, you may still have a chance…
Sept. 24, 2016
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Given that we're spending so much time talking about appropriate standards for disclosure, I decided to take a quick look at some of the convention cards submitted by the Spanish team.

For example: http://www.ecatsbridge.com/documents/files/2016WroclawSystems/OpenTeams/Spain/Goded-Goded.pdf

I can't help but note that this provides almost no useful information about the strength required for an opening bid or to respond to their 1C opening, or honestly anything that you'd want to know… Three of the four Spanish pairs are in (pretty much) the same boat.
Sept. 24, 2016
Richard Willey edited this comment Sept. 24, 2016
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These days parallelizing stuff is pretty much just a configuration option…

I know that in MATLAB you can parallelize the whole affair with a couple lines of code. Amazon Web Services is a bit more tricky…
Sept. 23, 2016
Richard Willey edited this comment Sept. 23, 2016
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Ray, couple data points

1. While I didn't implement this attack, I did discuss with with a bunch of folks at work. Most categorized this an interesting problem. The kind that you'd give out as an end of term project for a junior or a senior. The reason that none of us went after this was that it wasn't considered to be challenging enough… (As soon as it was apparent that an LCG was being used, it was game over)

2. Its quite clear that the problem is pretty trivial to parallelize. This means that if you're willing to spend a modicum of $$$ you can crack this nearly instantaneously…
Sept. 23, 2016
Richard Willey edited this comment Sept. 23, 2016
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This is sake, not wine, and its not particularly expensive sake, (and oh yeah, I'm not Brian), however, I consider this a real find especially if bought by the case

http://www.liquorama.net/huchu-homare-watari-bune-junmai-ginjo-55-sake-720ml.html
Sept. 23, 2016
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Well done!
Sept. 23, 2016
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> @Richard you don't need 10,000s of thousands of hands,
> if Meckwell psyched twice in a certain position yesterday,
> and did for a third time today on the same position I would
> believe they have developed a partnership tendency, and
> they are more aware of this possibility than opponents,
> even when they never psyched on that certain position on
> the hundreds of thousands hands they have played together.

Two swallows do not a summer make…

You are describing a theory about psyches that, popular as it may be, has not bearing in juris prudence. Case in point: How many times has Zia psyched the exact same weak NT opening in third seat with 7-8 balanced? I've seen him do it “live” on three separate occasions and I know of a bunch of other cases. And in spite of this, Zia and Rosenberg were not held to have a CPU.

In my opinion, the fact that you are able to find two hands matching your hypothesis in a relatively short amount of time is not sufficient to bring charges of this nature. Moreover, the fact that your team chose to bring these charges forward casts a lot of doubt on your judgement.
Sept. 23, 2016
Richard Willey edited this comment Sept. 23, 2016
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Regretfully, the ACBL's convention regulations don't include appropriate vocabulary for folks to describe methods that include deliberate randomization.

As such, the legality of your methods (pretty much) depends on the frequency with which this is occurring. Given that you use the word routinely to describe what's what, I'd say that the method sounds illegal to me.

If the method is frequent enough that you think it needs to be alerted, then it is definitely illegal…
Sept. 22, 2016
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