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All comments by Richard Willey
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> But the noticeable thing was seven sessions
> in a row with higher HCPs in N/S hand.
> Seven out of seven.

Here is a snippet of R code

# Flip a coin 200 times
foo <- rbinom(200,1,.5)

# Calculate the length of a run (A string of 1s or 0s, all in a row)
bar <- rle(foo)

# Display this as a table
table(bar$lengths)

Run Length : Number of occurrences (of a run of 1s)

1 : 46
2 : 29
3 : 17
4 : 2
5 : 6
6 : 6
7 : 1

These sorts of things happen. They aren't even all that uncommon

Here's the same table for 10,000 coin flips

1 : 2553
2 : 1245
3 : 626
4 : 324
5 : 159
6 : 65
7 : 37
8 : 15
9 : 16
10 : 4
11 : 1
12 : 2
May 11
Richard Willey edited this comment May 11
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And, in a none too surprising development, we're now starting to see significant outbreaks in rural America

Good article in the Glove and Mail a couple days back

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/editorials/article-dear-america-youre-sick-get-well-soon-until-then-stay-home-love/?fbclid=IwAR2U0AlqtIgsvanuTjO7kEa_hg52DO1rQHHsEJ8-Z8rCM0nj-DjeTSfgd28
May 10
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> how can we metropolitan clubs compete dollar-wise
> with say a temple game in a rural region of the country,
> or with the Villages game in Florida with their much
> lower cost of living and with their not having a rent
>to pay?

Odds are, you can't.

However, it's not the job of the ACBL to protect you against the consequences of an unsustainable business model. Nor should you be allowed to prevent ACBL members from taking advantage of better online options

> These factors play a huge role in how
> much they can charge. Level that playing
> field and then let's have a go at it.

The way in which this business model gets“leveled” is that you need to shut down your physical clubs and rationalize those cost structures. At which point in time, you can start competing based on provide value to end users.
May 10
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Churches are another “special case” in that they have protections under the first amendment, and, as such its quite possible that we would see them reopening before other “similar” social gatherings do not.

With this said and done, I want to return to the point that I have made several times before

1. The very nature of duplicate bridge is antithetical to social distancing
2. The demographic base of the game is incredibly vulnerable to coronavirus

If I learned that anyone was trying to start up a duplicate bridge game in Massachusetts, I'd call the State to have them shut down. It will take the development of a vaccine to make me feel differently.
May 10
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I think that folks are looking at this backwards

The rest of the world uses pre-duplicated boards for team games because they invested more / invested earlier in machines to deal hands.

The ACBL simply did not have the ability to do this in a cost effective manner until recently.
May 9
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I am simply saying that if I were adding additional functionality to BBO, it would not be a public / private key crypto system.

Build the functionality that you really want. In this case, the ability to run Swiss Team events.
May 9
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Speaking as someone who spends time professionally to helping design review professional software developers trying to integrate crypto into distributed systems, I would be to differ
May 9
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FWIW, if I were implementing something like this, I'd do it as follows

1. The director creates an event (the event has a name, a duration, potentially a list of teams or pairs or teams that can participate)

2. Teams (or pairs of team) are then able to join the “event” any time during the “duration”

I don't think that you need to be as rigorous as specific a set start time for a game
May 9
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> The solution as I suggested upthread is to
> have simple asymmetric encryption.

I have to believe that it would be far far simpler for BBO to simply allow a single person to create multiple team games all using the same set of hands than building in public / private key crypto system (to allow a single person to cajole a large number of players to create a set of team games all using the same set of hands)
May 9
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Schools are necessary. Bridge clubs aren't.

In a similar vein, it's ridiculous to equate “jobs” or “the economy” in general with a bridge club.

1. Almost by definition, the nature of duplicate bridge is antithetical to social distancing. By design, the game requires that players tightly mix with one another for 15 minutes or so and then mix with another small group …

2. The demographics of the game are an incredibly good match for a group of people who are most at risk from COVID-19.

I understand that there are groups of people who need to expose themselves to the virus in order for society to continue to operate. This doesn't mean that everyone should do so. Nor does it mean that people who feel like socializing should be allowed to burden the rest of society.

I hope that we return to a world in which the virus has been controlled sufficiently such that large public gatherings are possible. However, I don't think that's going to happen until we either have a vaccine or herd immunity. Especially, as I see articles like this one

https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/south-korea-faces-flare-up-in-coronavirus-cases-tied-to-nightclubs

South Korea re-opened bars and night clubs
A single carrier went partying
Now their look to be 40 new cases linked to this single individual

This virus spreads incredibly easily.
You can't give it an inch.
And that means that you don't get to run duplicate bridge games
May 9
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???

SAYC was originally specified by the ACBL as a standard system that a random pair of tournament players would find acceptable. There were even attempts to create SAYC events. The ACBL never attempted to use SAYC as any kind of teaching system.

The “system” was all but forgotten up until the early 90s when Matt Clegg wanted to included some kind standard system for folks to used with OKBridge. Clegg bundled a test document describing SAYC with OKB and a plague was let loose upon the world.
May 9
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Akamai just announced that employees should be planning to work from home through the end of the year. Google, Facebook, and the other large tech companies have announced the same. Most “white collar” offices are making similar plans.

Why? Because, while there are some advantages to having people working in the same space and having meetings F2F, it's not worth the risk of killing your employees and its incredibly irresponsible to society as a whole.

I wouldn't give a damn if some bridge club all decided to mix up a bunch of Kool Aide, thrown in some cyanide, and go off to meet the saucer people. I'd think it was weird. Maybe even a shame. But so be it. However, your bridge club's decision to reopen is going to impose a massive burden on society as a whole…
May 9
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The chart in question is quite well organized

If your target audience is too lazy to be able to look and understand this chart, why do you believe that some random list of named conventions is going to be any better?

Random lists of facts are a pain in the butt to memorize.
Having a structure to hang things off of is what makes life easy
May 8
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> however, it's important to understand that
> dealing a randomly shuffled deck into four
> hands of 13 cards is trivial to implement.

Yes, but it's also very easy to screw up if you don't do it correctly

There's a reason why this is a classic question to prepare on for a software programming interview (and a reason why its in Knuth)
May 8
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As I recall, the method that you are describing is the default method that Big Deal chooses the seed for the PRNG. I think that it actually use a Mersenne Twister under the hood.

Note: Big Deal includes a bunch of code that can be used to validate / pre-commit to seed generation which seems inconsistent with in implementation like the one that you are suggesting. Also, the sheer amount of entropy that would be required to do this would be annoying with any manual process…
May 8
Richard Willey edited this comment May 8
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The ACBL is currently using Hans van Stavern's Big Deal to generate hands.

Both the algorithm and the source code are available
May 7
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Law 40, Section B, Subsection 5 (a) reads as follows:

5.(a) When explaining the significance of
partner’s call or play in reply to an
opponent’s enquiry (see Law 20) a player
shall disclose all special information
conveyed to him through partnership
agreement or partnership experience but
he need not disclose inferences drawn from
his knowledge and experience of matters

In the original example, in which two random experts are pairs up with one another with no discussion of system, it would seem entire lawful to reply “undiscussed”.
May 7
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Its almost as if players who are better at the game have some kind of advantage…
May 7
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> I think there was software that helped mine
> these hand records, but I'm not remembering
> what it is, so maybe someone could suggest
>what to help here.

There was a product called Bridge Browser written by Stephen Pickett
May 7
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