Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Richard Willey
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I'll echo an earlier comment. Point them at https://bridgewinners.com/article/view/best-defense-against-big-club/

or, better yet, teach them to use google.
Feb. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
> I checked with ACBL and they said those booklets
> did, in fact, exist

You are, of course, aware that the good folks at Horn Lake often get things very very wrong…
Feb. 11
Richard Willey edited this comment Feb. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Arguably, one key element of bridge is evaluating when its worth while to adopt a conventional defense and when its better just to play something natural.

Encouraging players to lean on crutches really isn't going to do them much good improving their game.
Feb. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
While I am familiar with the various sordid attempts that the ACBL made to create a defensive database, I don't think that it ever included defenses to either a strong club opening or a Precision style 1 opening.

I suspect that you might be confusing some pamphlets that a private individual published and sold with an official effort by the ACBL.
Feb. 11
Richard Willey edited this comment Feb. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
1.
a structure carrying a road, path, railroad, or canal across a river, ravine, road, railroad, or other obstacle.
“a bridge across the river”
synonyms: viaduct, aqueduct, flyover, overpass; way over
“a bridge over the river”
something that is intended to reconcile or form a connection between two things.
“a committee that was formed to create a bridge between rival parties”
synonyms: link, connection, means of uniting; More
short for land bridge.
2.
the elevated, enclosed platform on a ship from which the captain and officers direct operations.
3.
the upper bony part of a person's nose.
“he pushed his spectacles further up the bridge of his nose”
the central part of a pair of glasses, fitting over the bridge of the nose.
“these sunglasses have a special nose bridge for comfort”
4.
a partial denture supported by natural teeth on either side.
5.
MUSIC
the part of a string instrument over which the strings are stretched.
6.
MUSIC
a bridge passage or middle eight.
7.
the support formed by the hand for the forward part of a billiard cue.
a long stick with a frame at the end that is used to support a cue for a shot that is otherwise hard to reach.
8.
an electric circuit with two branches across which a detector or load is connected, used to measure resistance or other property by equalizing the potential across the two ends of a detector, or to rectify an alternating voltage or current.
Feb. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Didn't the WBF permanently put a stake in DWS a little while ago?
Feb. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Two related questions:

1. What were / are you doing that caused the ACBL to threaten to withdraw your sanction?

2. What role is there for a national organization like the ACBL in a world dominated by “social” bridge clubs?
Feb. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
> I am, however, primarily looking for a consensus meaning of
> ‘convention’ that does not conflict with the definition and use
> of ‘artificial’ in the Laws.

In all seriousness, what does this matter?

Once upon a time, before the Laws permitted organization to regulate natural bidding, these sorts of distinctions had some bearing on the game. (Arguably, this was all moot once the Endicott dodge became acceptable)

These days, these definitions don't actually matter. What is VERY important is whether or not the local regulatory bodies have created rules that are logically consistent and easy to understand. And none of this actually depends on whether there is consensus about what is / isn't conventional or natural.
Feb. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If we actually cared about this, we'd also pay attention to silly little issues such as the likelihood that the particular format is able to identify the the best pair…
Feb. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
And, of course, by this same definition, a disciplined weak two bid which denies a side four card major or an outside void is also a convention as is a "Bailey style weak two bid which promises three cards in the unbid major.
Feb. 8
Richard Willey edited this comment Feb. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
> $125 every 4 boards

Can't help but believe that the ACBL is overpaying
Feb. 7
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
> why are the same ones used for both events at the same time?

Because it costs money to have someone analyze the board results I presume
Feb. 6
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
> Hasn’t it been standard practice to use different
> deal sources for different events?

As its name suggests, the entire point of the Common Game is to have an enormous number of clubs playing the same hands.

The event organizers are consciously sacrificing security to achieve this end
Feb. 6
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
My impression is that the “special hands” that the Common Game uses are rendered “special” by the fact that they have analysis of various hands, NOT the way in which said hands were generated.
Feb. 6
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Here the thing:

I look at the opponent's convention card at the start of each round. it actually contains useful information. Adding more is superfluous.

I also write up a convention card that the opponents can look at at the start of each round because our disclosure system uses convention cards to provide this type if information.

Layering on addition cruft should be unnecessary.

If there is a problem with the existing system - if for example people aren't filling the cards out - then bring people into conformity with the established standard…
Feb. 6
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Years ad years back when I was living in Cincinatti I was actually playing Ron Klinger's Power System in a local club.

I don't think that we had ANY bidding sequences that weren't alertable.
Nary a one…

(And when I say weren't alertable, I mean that they were legitimately alertable. Weird system)
Feb. 6
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
> People moving up indeed have a lot to learn.
> That doesn’t include the details of their opponents’ system.

The fact that a Precision pair plays 1 - some positive as game forcing isn't some cryptic detail about the system. Its as basic as it gets. Back when I learned bridge, players were expected to know this type of stuff.

If you're playing something really weird like MOSCITO or a strong pass system then I agree with you, but you're picking really poor examples to try and make this point.

> Why are you reluctant to provide such details?

Because I see way too many cases where American internationalists deliberately shield themselves from learning the basics about methods that are played elsewhere in the world and then try to use their own ignorance as grounds to try to - say - get a Polish style 1 opening banned.
Feb. 6
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
> Ed, if you are disturbed by LHO's questions, then maybe
> you should not be playing your 1♥ response.

How does Ed's 1 response excuse cheating by the opponents?
Feb. 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
> Why not make it as quick and easy a process as we can?

Because using verbal announcements to replicate information that is sitting right at the top of the convention card is NOT the quickest and easiest a process .
Feb. 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Comment 1: Convention cards exist for a reason

Comment 2: Once upon the ACBL alert and convention charts included language that players were expected to be familiar with the basics of standard systems.
Feb. 5
.

Bottom Home Top