Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Robb Gordon
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ahh, yes. This is exactly the bogus rumor to which I referred. NOBODY was caught cheating with cellphones in SF, but there was a lot of talk about it, some of it spread by ACBL Board members.
July 20, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I hear the ACBL has invested in a Predator drone that will fly around the room detecting cell phones and zap their owners. Seriously, I think banning cell phones and devices from the playing area is bad for many reasons and should be reconsidered. Cheaters WILL cheat, with or without devices. The amazing thing is this policy was developed in response to a bogus rumor (perhaps started by backers of the policy) that a Chinese women's team was cheating at an NABC by text messaging. Instead of a policy, they should have published an apology.
July 20, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
NF. If you don't know who owns the hand, it isn't forcing, and from the auction I certainly don't know.
June 14, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Over the years it seems that we have made great advances in creating an atmosphere where behavior and separately, ethics are much better than even 30 years ago. Do you agree? What changes in culture and/or regulation still need to happen to make our game even better?
June 9, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Thank you all for your comments!
June 6, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Personally, I think I am in the Phillp & Peg camp as a player here. However club games (especially with novices or casual players) are different. My policy at our club is to only get the director involved when the infraction creates a problem in playing the hand normally. But we are fortunate at our club that we use these unpenalized infractions to educate our opponents as to proper procedure. I would NOT recommend this at most clubs.
May 9, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Jenni thanks for your comments. On the slam, you don't even get to the point of Law 50. Law45C2:

Declarer must play a card from his hand if it is
(a) held face up, touching or nearly touching the
table; or
(b) maintained in such a position as to indicate
that it has been played.

You played the card. Ergo it is a played card, regardless of mental/physical process.
May 8, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't want to argue semantics. Obviously self-serving doesn't mean untrue. But most experts know the “right” answer to questions and directors shouldn't be in the business of deciding that Joe is being truthful but Zack isn't. Besides, sometimes the person will honestly believe that he made a physical error…and be mistaken. I hope a tournament director joins this discussion because discounting self-serving evidence is exactly what he will do.
May 8, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You have to assume that because any statement by the player involved must be deemed to be self-serving, and it is impossible to distinguish between a physical and mental error unless there is actual fumbling or some physical indication. Also, if a player takes a card out of his hand and plays it, however inadvertently, without looking at the face of the card, or despite looking at the face of the card it is, ipso facto, a mental error.
May 8, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Good comments Michael. I believe I clarified my view on mental vs. physical in my last post about minor penalty card. Since we are not mind readers we have to go by the physical evidence of what took place. For example, all of us have “pulled the wrong card out of our hand”. You reach for the spade ace and pull out the club deuce and it hits the table before you notice. Mental or physical? No way to know, but we have to assume mental.
May 8, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If indeed the card dropped out of defender's hand it would be a minor penalty card. But if he pulled the wrong card out of his hand it would be a played card. The director must make this determination, and resolve doubt in favor of the non-offenders.
May 8, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In a social game I would certainly allow an “undo”. But by and large, the laws of bridge are carefully considered to create an outcome that doesn't tolerate an advantage to the offending side as a result of “accidents”. The cost of this is occasionally an unmakable contract is made. Do you enforce the revoke penalty when it causes your opponent to lose his ace of trump? What is the standard for when to allow and when not do? What this does is create a game that is no longer bridge and no longer has structure. How do you feel when you let the opponents recover their slip but they do not reciprocate when you have a slip? Also, note that in the case where the “wrong” card slips out it may be the only winning play. That is a “rub of the green” bonus for the player whose fingers slip!
May 8, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
This reminds me of a pair event at the Chicago NABC in the late ‘70s. Our opps got to the table a few minutes after game time. They were the late Ron Anderson and the late Barry Crane. I asked them for a convention card. Hog sighed, stood up and pulled out a rumpled cc torn in half horizontally. I glanced at it and said “what is this 2C response to a major?” He replied “it is not an asking bid it is a telling bid” basically showing clubs or a limit raise. Hog opened 1S on my left and Crane responded 2C. I called the director who proceeded to explain to our opps that a - they need 2 cards, and b - they can’t play Drury in first and second seat (which Crane knew and violated all the time). Hog went nuts and started stomping around, returned to the table and proceeded to give us two tops. Gamesmanship on my part? No, I didn't care what they played until it came up against me. Then I felt I had to protect my equity vs. other pairs not facing this convention.
March 28, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Great idea - do it!

Robb
Jan. 7, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I held this hand. Since we had a poor afternoon score, I thought it was a good time to risk 7H. Why not 7NT? I thought it was asking too much of the Bridge Gods for the HQ to fall, and nothing bad in clubs (including a trick 1 ruff).

I was disappointed to push the board!
Aug. 8, 2011
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Well SuperG, KISS has never been a bad idea. Your point is well taken.
April 16, 2011
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
After 1m - 1H - 2H it is clearly important to find the spade fit.
But can't that be done by using 2NT to show 4 spades?
This gives you a bigger set of responses below 3H.
April 15, 2011
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Barry - We can debate the definition of a psyche, but in this context I think it means that it becomes obvious to your opponent that he has been hoodwinked by your chicanery. A bid of a suit where you have concentrated values/texture is ipso facto NOT in that category, so I would not be concerned by such an action.

April 1, 2011
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
“Also, the MOST important skill you can pick up at the club is how to take every matchpoint from the weaker players. That's a very important skill to bring to open pair games.”

This is where I might have agreed 35 years ago.
Now I think the most important skill to pick up at the club is how to get along with the weaker players and encourage them to keep playing.
April 1, 2011
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think the answer to this question comes from within.

First, we love the game and want it to survive. We realize that if the only people left
are experts, eventually there will be nobody left. We need casual players. Casual players
don't mind losing to somebody who outplays them, but many consider psyches akin to cheating.
We know that is wrong, but that player will feel cheated, and if it happens often enough, he
will quit.

So, which is more important - your winning in that club game (and you rate to average about 70% against
this opponent without psyching anyway) or survival of the game?

In fairness, if I looked at this situation 35 years ago when I was very young, I would not have had the same answer.
April 1, 2011
.

Bottom Home Top