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All comments by Robb Gordon
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Good comments Michael. I believe I clarified my view on mental vs. physical in my last post about minor penalty card. Since we are not mind readers we have to go by the physical evidence of what took place. For example, all of us have “pulled the wrong card out of our hand”. You reach for the spade ace and pull out the club deuce and it hits the table before you notice. Mental or physical? No way to know, but we have to assume mental.
May 8, 2012
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If indeed the card dropped out of defender's hand it would be a minor penalty card. But if he pulled the wrong card out of his hand it would be a played card. The director must make this determination, and resolve doubt in favor of the non-offenders.
May 8, 2012
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In a social game I would certainly allow an “undo”. But by and large, the laws of bridge are carefully considered to create an outcome that doesn't tolerate an advantage to the offending side as a result of “accidents”. The cost of this is occasionally an unmakable contract is made. Do you enforce the revoke penalty when it causes your opponent to lose his ace of trump? What is the standard for when to allow and when not do? What this does is create a game that is no longer bridge and no longer has structure. How do you feel when you let the opponents recover their slip but they do not reciprocate when you have a slip? Also, note that in the case where the “wrong” card slips out it may be the only winning play. That is a “rub of the green” bonus for the player whose fingers slip!
May 8, 2012
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This reminds me of a pair event at the Chicago NABC in the late ‘70s. Our opps got to the table a few minutes after game time. They were the late Ron Anderson and the late Barry Crane. I asked them for a convention card. Hog sighed, stood up and pulled out a rumpled cc torn in half horizontally. I glanced at it and said “what is this 2C response to a major?” He replied “it is not an asking bid it is a telling bid” basically showing clubs or a limit raise. Hog opened 1S on my left and Crane responded 2C. I called the director who proceeded to explain to our opps that a - they need 2 cards, and b - they can’t play Drury in first and second seat (which Crane knew and violated all the time). Hog went nuts and started stomping around, returned to the table and proceeded to give us two tops. Gamesmanship on my part? No, I didn't care what they played until it came up against me. Then I felt I had to protect my equity vs. other pairs not facing this convention.
March 28, 2012
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Great idea - do it!

Robb
Jan. 7, 2012
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I held this hand. Since we had a poor afternoon score, I thought it was a good time to risk 7H. Why not 7NT? I thought it was asking too much of the Bridge Gods for the HQ to fall, and nothing bad in clubs (including a trick 1 ruff).

I was disappointed to push the board!
Aug. 8, 2011
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Well SuperG, KISS has never been a bad idea. Your point is well taken.
April 16, 2011
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After 1m - 1H - 2H it is clearly important to find the spade fit.
But can't that be done by using 2NT to show 4 spades?
This gives you a bigger set of responses below 3H.
April 15, 2011
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Barry - We can debate the definition of a psyche, but in this context I think it means that it becomes obvious to your opponent that he has been hoodwinked by your chicanery. A bid of a suit where you have concentrated values/texture is ipso facto NOT in that category, so I would not be concerned by such an action.

April 1, 2011
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“Also, the MOST important skill you can pick up at the club is how to take every matchpoint from the weaker players. That's a very important skill to bring to open pair games.”

This is where I might have agreed 35 years ago.
Now I think the most important skill to pick up at the club is how to get along with the weaker players and encourage them to keep playing.
April 1, 2011
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I think the answer to this question comes from within.

First, we love the game and want it to survive. We realize that if the only people left
are experts, eventually there will be nobody left. We need casual players. Casual players
don't mind losing to somebody who outplays them, but many consider psyches akin to cheating.
We know that is wrong, but that player will feel cheated, and if it happens often enough, he
will quit.

So, which is more important - your winning in that club game (and you rate to average about 70% against
this opponent without psyching anyway) or survival of the game?

In fairness, if I looked at this situation 35 years ago when I was very young, I would not have had the same answer.
April 1, 2011
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There was much to be learned from attending this event, good and bad. General comments:

1. The playing area was excellent. Good acoustics, good space. The only negative was a few “black holes” (dark places).
2. The pre-duplicated boards were great. They are standard fare for pairs events here in the West. But nobody in bridge
administration in the US is aware of, or willing to admit how much randomness is added to Victory-Point Swiss Team events
by dealing hands.
3. Like everybody else said, be more consistent with starting times, with more time in between. If it wasn't for the excellent and handy Reading Terminal Market, the schedule would have been impossible. I like the morning/afternoon schedule, but Linda likes afternoon and evening. You aren't going to make everybody happy, but I suspect that age of members is going to influence the ACBL to do more of the former.
4. The rapid results, video displays, Butler scores, and a summary sheet in Pairs events before the last round was great. But I do like to look at an old-fashioned recap sheet, and they didn't exist. If a pair wanted their scores, they had to go to a particular place and ask for them.
5. The entry fees were high. On the other hand, the equipment and staff needed make this an expensive tournament. I am not sure where the right balance lies.
6. Everybody liked the cards. For the record, I HATED the Aces that had these weird pips on them. I tried to revoke with an ace more than once.
Oct. 26, 2010
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I was reading Bart Bramley's Bermuda Bowl article in the Bridge World Magazine.
Nunes opened a 12-14 1NT and Rodwell bid 2C showing Spades and either Hearts or Clubs.
Does anybody know the rest of this convention?
June 30, 2010
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Gavin, thanks so much for your post, but I am looking for COUNTER defenses, not the defenses themselves.

Robb
June 28, 2010
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