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All comments by Shireen Mohandes
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Dale, I sent OED “Barbu” for inclusion, years ago. Pretty easy to verify … still not there.

When I started playing in the 80s I recall the phrase being used at The Acol Bridge club. Cards were boxed all the time because dummy kept on asking to see declarer's hand either before opening lead, or after the end/claim, and inevitably there would be some loud noises, exclamations, and the odd boxed card (no hand records those days).

I have never seen exactly two boxed cards in the same hand. Either just one, or lots. It would be mildly interesting to find out if it is more associated with dummy, declarer, or specific defender.., Might be a UI situation of the boxed card, detected before anyone sees it, reveals that that specific hand is likely to be, for example, dummy.

I once saw a hand that was not boxed, but so scrunched that it could not fit into the plastic board. The board had to be redealt. A very “active” nervy young player, who is a frequent BW poster these days.
Nov. 10
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see my article here
https://mrbridge.co.uk/library/single-magazine.html?issue=174#174/page/6

in the press release it said that they went to some duplicates and a sectional to understand a bit more and prepare them.
Nov. 9
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I know a bridge player who played daleks in the early series of Dt Who. I don't think he wants people to know about it.
Nov. 8
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2 members of Blur play bridge.
Nov. 8
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some people who are not on BW or have chosen to reply to me privately have voted like this:

2D = 12 votes
3H = 5 votes
3d = 2 votes
2s = 1 vote
4c = 1 vote

I imagine that broadly speaking they match the profile of the current respondents.
Nov. 4
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I think a few people have missed Robert Sheehan's point:

…that the bookmaker just did not want to be involved. All this stuff about the bookmaker needing to have a balanced book is irrelevant. It’s the Bermuda Bowl, not the World Cup Final, so there would be miniscule action by punters even if there was a genuine betting market.
Sept. 21
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Ed, I've played at a few nationals, and a couple of regionals. I find that if i ask (rather than “take”), people are happy to hand them over. Maybe it is the British accent.
Sept. 11
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David - if you are only bidding slams which make on any break of side suits and trumps, then maybe you are not bidding enough of them? :)
Sept. 11
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or - if you have the oppo card, and it is complete - no need to ask?
Sept. 11
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I provide my convention card to my RHO. I try to have the oppo's convention card within reading distance. Seems to work for me. I admit this is hard when you are late moving, and under time pressure to start a board. Otherwise, what Kit says above.
Sept. 10
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The good, the bad, and the ugly:

OKBridge had a huge stand, and it was the first time that many saw how one could play bridge on the internet.

The final of the Open Pairs was messed up … in two sessions the wrong movement cards/table numbers/boards were set up. The upshot was that several pairs could not play some boards, and were given an adjusted score. Only the adjustment was later changed (to a lesser number, and contrary to the conditions of contest). This affected the winners and second place. Both pairs were/are outstanding player, and deservedly winners …

For the first time in my life the TD who gave us a ruling reacted badly (one could say in a Harvey Keitel sort of way) when we said we wanted to appeal. He explained that he was going out for a nice dinner, and he did not want his plans messed up. He added if we appealed he would make sure he tried his hardest that things turn out badly for us, and furthermore, any other time we asked for a ruling, things would go badly. We reported the TD to the organisers and chief TD. They immediately changed the score in our favour. They did not want the appeal to appear in the Daily Bulletin.
Sept. 5
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photos from that event here: https://www.facebook.com/pg/contractbridgephotos/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1676042452502859

Facebook account needed to view.
Sept. 4
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I looked in the book. It says “in 6NT Jeremy Flint soon demonstrates almost the best technical way of playing the hand…”
The line he played was AQ, club to A, club back thru East.

Nicola says in the book “I consulted my friend Derek Rimington on this hand, and he made the following observation. Say the layout of the hand had been different:
West
9 7 4 2
10 9 8 3
10
K 10 9 8

The lead would be the same and when declarer plays the 3, West still plays the eight. Dummy's ace wins but when the 4 is led, East shows out and the contract is unmakeable. West wins declarer's queen with the king and plays any card at random. It matters not, one of the defenders must make one more trick in a minor suit.
If, however, the correct method of playing on diamonds first is adopted the contract succeeds on the actual hand and also on the one set our above. Let us play through the latter. The A is cashed and when both opponents follow it is safe to cross to dummy with the A in case East has the singleton. Then a diamond is led to the queen, and west shows out. It is time to switch back to clubs.”
Aug. 30
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A book accompanies the series. If you want me to look anything up, please ask. Bob Rowlands did say that the auctions did not, at times, mean that they were in the intended contract, with intended negative and positive inferences.
Aug. 30
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Yes, it is a Steely Dan based arrangement.

The chorus is:

You go back, Jack
You go back
Do it again
Wheel's turnin' round and round
You go back, Jack
Do it again
Aug. 28
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a message from the producer, David Elstein:

“…the whole idea was ”master“ bridge - ie, how the best players handled deliberately problematic hands. Nicola (and Bob) carefully prepared a series of deals designed to illustrate tricky issues, and Nicola wrote an accompanying Channel Four book, where she expanded on each theme. Sadly, video graphics in those days were fairly primitive, and despite spending long hours in the edit suite, I could only manage what you see on screen. Today, of course, the graphics would be vastly superior, would be on screen whenever needed, and would be fully integrated into the table action.

”Grand Slam“ was much more accessible, in that it was not pre-dealt, and not so compressed in its design. ”Master Bridge“ was something that could never happen in real life, whether tournaments or competitive matches or simply at the kitchen table - an individual tournament where each of eight experts played four hands with each of the other experts, and the degree of difficulty sustained throughout so as not to advantage any pairing, yet designed to give every player a chance to shine (or not). So, perhaps over-constructed!… ”

(end of quote)

Notes :
Bob = Bob Rowlands
Grand Slam was broadcast in 1981 (BBC, 2 series)
Aug. 28
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Have a look here David: http://cbf.ca/kehela-sami/?

it starts out saying: “Sami Kehela was born in Baghdad in 1934 and spent his early years in London, England and Berkeley, California before settling in Toronto. ”
Aug. 28
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an update: Bob Rowlands set all 28 deals. Each deal had a theme, but it needed players to stick to no trump ranges as pre-defined. Rixi insisted on playing strong No Trump, so she was to sit north at all times, and north-south were to play strong NT in both rooms, east-west to play weak in both rooms. Apparently, Bob said, that Omar departed from the agreement and so the theme of the hand didn't work as planned. More later, after I meet up with him for a cup of tea.
Aug. 27
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James, may I make a suggestion?

In your introduction mention your sources, thank them, and make a small donation to Wikipedia.

Finally, set yourself up as an editor on Wiki (takes about 10 mins) and contribute 20 edits.

All of that will take you about an hour (delighted to help you, if needed).
July 31
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