Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Shireen Mohandes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 19 20 21 22
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
in his autiobiog CONFESSIONS OF AN ADDICT there are some amusing and detailed references to illegal behaviour, but from memory, all about rubber bridge.
Dec. 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I heard he used to like sitting north on table 1. This way he would not delay the duplicate if he was waiting to be served at the bar. He could just pass on the message “tell them I open 1 spade”.
Nov. 27
Shireen Mohandes edited this comment Nov. 27
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I would like to piggyback a small poll please. Had West thought before bidding 4 Hearts. And, had East not doubled the final contract. Would an AC determine that (1) UI suggested that pass suggested, and (2) doubling was a logical alternative (albeit a poor call)? If you think the AC will stick e/w with 4SX making, please can you “like” this comment?
Nov. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Truscott says
https://www.nytimes.com/1975/09/18/archives/bridge-star-of-thirties-returns-to-triumph-on-west-coast.html

The Rip Van Winkle was Michael Gottlieb, a member of the. Four Aces team that swept all before it four decades ago. He was one of Ely Culbertson's partners in the celebrated Culbertson‐Lenz challenge match in 1931, and won a string of titles in the next five years.

In 1933, Gottlieb helped Culbertson win the Schwab Cup match in England, and in 1935 he was on the Four Aces team that defeated France in the first official world title match, played in Madison Square Garden.

If people have access to press in USA and France, which are subscription based, I'd appreciate more information about this.
Nov. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I have been sent a lovely photo of the special event. It was against a French team. Dec 23, 1935, in The New Scotsman, a report described the match : the Four Aces v The Quatre Jacques.
Also, the Illustrated London News on 11 Jan 1936 had a story. The last 8 deals were played as described in op.
Nov. 10
Shireen Mohandes edited this comment Nov. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I now know Reese copyright owner. A relative mentioned in Alwyn's will. It was easy, cheap and fast to get. Will communicate to Richard Fleet and Ken via email.

Have also purchased a few more wills that may help… If anyone wants to know how to do this, the UK government has s new system in beta. I found it simple to use, and wills and probate cost £1.50 for both. Of course, there may not be a will but the probate will help to trace owner.
Nov. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Skid made 2 trips to USA that we know of. One in late 30s. Knowledge of date of articles would be helpful.
Nov. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
More on the LSE:
Ok, so I was not quite right ….
He started a journalism course at LSE in October 1927. He planned to complete it in July 1929.

I will contact LSE to find out. The evidence I am looking it is application forms and letters from his solicitor. So I think these are more likely to be correct than memories of friends in other books.
Nov. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
His other pen name was “Spondee”. He wrote for “The Humorist” and “London Opinion”.

“he went to the Power and Plant Company, West Drayton, Middlesex, to learn engineering, leaving there in September 1925, to take a situation as engineering instructor at the International Correspondence College, Kingsway. He also continued his studies at the University of London. In July 1927 he commenced practicing as a free lance journalist …”

(written dated 19 May 1930, part of his application for naturalisation)
Nov. 8
Shireen Mohandes edited this comment Nov. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I am looking for dedications in different editions of books. Here are my notes, if anyone has any of these books and would be kind enough to look at the dedications, i would appreciate it.


A Bullet in the Ballet
“Helga Charles & Harold
AND
OVERCOME BY SUDDEN AFFECTION DUE TO NOT HAVING MET FOR THE NEXT SIX MONTHS, THE AUTHORS DEDICATE THIS BOOK TO ONE ANOTHER”

Casino For Sale
“THE AUTHORS ONCE AGAIN PARTED FOREVER THEIR SOLICITORS DEDICATE THIS BOOK TO Dee”

The Elephant is White

Envoy On Excursion

Don’t, Mr Disraeli

No Bed for Bacon
“To our parents”
No Nightingales
“And therefore DFeath is no such Terrible Enemie when a man has so many Attendants about him. Bacon. plus thanks to London Library”

Six Curtains for Stroganova
“to Nina Tarkanova Ballerina and Judy Campbell Nightingale”

(plus Caryl Brahms dedicated in memory of S J Simon)

Titiania has a Mother

Trottie True
“Hermione Baddeley”

To Hell with Hedda
You Were There

Why you lose at bridge
1st and 2nd editions published in 1945, hardcovers, same jacket, both dedicated to Richard Lederer
Reissue in 1970, different cover, same dedication

Design for Bidding.
1st Ed. 1949, 2nd 1951, identical and published post mortem. Comment by Reese, no dedication.

Cut for Partners.
1st Ed. Foreword by Reese, no dedication
Nov. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
No Nightingales = the movie The Ghosts of Berkeley Square (1947)
film adaptation
Nov. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Archie (Arcadius) born 1901, and “MG”
Think the order is: Archie (oldest), Seca (1904), Boris(1907) and MG but don't know the name, and Dave Beer has some records which may confilct (this section updated recently)
These are the names they called each other.
Skid's birth name is : Seca Jascha Skidelsky
He used these last names: Simon, Skidelsky, Skidelski (Plus the fourth one which is buried in my printed notes).
His wife was born
Kathleen Mary Carmel Withers
her nickname was Caramel.
She wrote 2 novels under the name of: Kathleen Carmel
Nov. 8
Shireen Mohandes edited this comment Nov. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
see below for details of education
Nov. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I am researching his life. So here are some headline facts:
He got a degree (BSc) in mechanical engineering,1925, University of London, University College. It was a pass (which means the lowest possible)
He studied Political Economy in his 1st term (but from his results he passed no exam in Economics, all of the topics are maths, physics, engineering, etc). In those days there was a rubber bridge game at the London School of Economics, which is not so far away - so perhaps these facts have been muddled a bit.
He co-authored many books with Caryl Brahms. “No Bed for Bacon” is said to be the basis for “Shakespeare in Love”.
Another was turned into a film. Both Skid and Caryl were air raid wardens at the same office.
He appeared on TV, live, after the war, a few times. So did his wife, Carmel (and her sister, and her sister's husband - they all represented UK at some stage of their lives in open and women's bridge).
In one of his application forms for naturalisation he is listed as having a non-bridge, non-writing job.
He used another name, apparently (neither of his nephews knew about this, and I have not been able to learn much).
Nov. 8
Shireen Mohandes edited this comment Nov. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Alwyn Reese passed away 1 July 2008. I have ordered a copy of her will, I hope there is some useful information for you Ken. Will let people know if anything else of interest turns up.
Nov. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Answering your second question:
IMHO “Please explain” is a concise, polite, and appropriate question which will get the information that is needed.
Oct. 26
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I look for double dummy analysis to see if a side can make exactly 7 tricks in all the denominations. I've seen it once.
Don't have a name for it. Onesie?

I wonder if there is a hand where both sides can do this. Anyone know?
Double-onesie?

North London rubber bridge players associate a hand containing two jacks with Richard Sampson. He used to be referred to as “two jacks”.
Oct. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I once saw him at an event, in a partially hidden area. I asked what he was doing, and why he was there. He replied that the scorers had made an error, and that he knew how to solve it, but he wanted to give his team plenty of time to solve the problem without his help, so they'd learn for themselves. By being out of vision, he thought that they'd feel more comfortable about discussing the matter amongst themselves and trying to figure it out.

He was right.

Another time I had heard of a special form of scoring that both partnerships in a team sat in the same direction, and the best of their scores counted (the worst is ignored for their side). I wanted to run an event like this, so I wrote to him, and he was really helpful and encouraging, he worked out the movement and told us all what was best. The event was really good fun, and we were all hugely appreciative of his advice.

These are just two small anecdotes to illustrate to his kindness, generosity and wisdom.
Oct. 8
Shireen Mohandes edited this comment Oct. 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
John Collings told me that once he stayed with Omar in his flat in France. There were no brass hinges on the doors, no brass fittings for locks. So when JC went to the bathroom, he had to move the door to create a barrier. The bailiffs had removed pretty much everything - including doorknobs, etc.
Oct. 2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 19 20 21 22
.

Bottom Home Top