Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Simon Cochemé
1 2
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If you take a letter away from Mother you get:
# An angry parent who was expecting a postal communication
# other
# Other
Sept. 25
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I was playing in Florida with an English partner. I opened 1NT, announced as 12-14, and he bid 2C. I alerted and, when asked, said it showed a multitude of possible hands. On hearing the partial word ‘multi’ my opponents snapped into action and called the director. When the director arrived, I continued my explanation:
“He has between zero and 28 points; he could be distributional or he could be balanced. He could have one or two four-card majors; he could be 5-4 in the majors; he may not have a major at all, or he could have a strong hand with a six or seven card suit, major or minor.”
They absorbed all this and the director asked what the responses were.
“He will bid 2H or 2S with a four card major, and 2D without one.”
“You mean like Stayman?” said the director.
“Exactly like Stayman,” I replied. “That’s what we call it in England. I wasn’t sure how it was played over here, and I didn’t want to be accused of less than full disclosure.”
Sept. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Did I miss Part 1? I can’f find it.
Sept. 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
David C: The German Seniors won the d’Orsi Bowl (senior equivalent of the Bermuda Bowl) in Bali in 2013. They were subsequently found to have been cheating (one cough for clubs, etc (?)) and the Gold medal was awarded to the American team. It was presented to five of the team at an ACBL National in Chicago; the sixth player had died.

I understand it was Eddie Wold and Donna Compton (American NPC) who cracked the code. I believe that the final was filmed without the knowledge of the Germans, and the tapes analysed afterwards.

They were known to have been ‘at it’ for many years. One irate player complained to the chief TD in Dublin, where the Germans qualified for the Bali event, and was told “I know, but we don’t know how.”
Sept. 2
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I have a partner who explained his signalling on a board where declarer played spades (trumps): "I threw the ♥8 to tell you I liked hearts, then the ♣2 to tell you that I didn't like clubs, then the ♥7 to remind you that I liked hearts.

He didn't realise it, but he was also giving me a count on the hand; I knew he had exactly one spade, at least three hearts, at least one club and possibly no diamonds.
July 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I did a similar analysis of the methods of the pairs who qualified for the quarter-finals of the World Championships in Chennai in 2015. 56% played Attitude, 23% played Count or Reverse Count, 8% played simple Suit Preference, and 13% played Odd-Encouraging discards. 60% of those who played Attitude actually played Reverse Attitude.

I assume your 8% various other included a pair who played ‘card orientation’ and maybe a pair who played ‘tray position’. Those two pairs qualified for Chennai, but were withdrawn before the event.
July 8
Simon Cochemé edited this comment July 8
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The press release for the event includes the following:

According to reports, this bridge competition is named after the “share god”, Mr. Warren Buffett, known as the world's highest top-level event. Bridge is an entertainment sport with cards. Because the two sides of the game have been fighting against each other on the “building bridge” and “destroying bridge” from beginning to end, it is called “bridge”.

It seems that computer translation still has a Wei to go.
April 24
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yes, the TV version was made in 2005. By chance, Christie's description of the deal will appear in December's ACBL Bulletin, I believe.
One more anecdote. The scene which included the (spoiler alert) murderous deal was meant to start with the opening lead, then dummy laying down his hand, and the completion of the first trick. The (award-winning) actor playing dummy was unable to transfer his hand from a fan into four columns on the table. (Bridge players don't realise how dexterous they have trained themselves to be.) So the scene was changed to: the lead is already on the table, three of dummy's suits have been laid out and dummy, who has the last suit all ready in a column, puts it down, and the first trick is completed. This is what actually happened: “Action!” … dummy puts down the last suit (check), declarer pulls a card from dummy to add to the lead in the middle of the table (check), third in hand contributes his card (check), declarer plays his ace (check). Now the leader, who knows that everyone is meant to play a card to each trick (and whose opening lead had been taken out of his hand by a junior assistant director five minutes ago) joins in and plays a card. Declarer collects the five card trick, taps it into shape, and puts it in front of him. The director calls “Cut!” and the bridge consultant calls “Director!”
Nov. 9, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I was the bridge ‘consultant’ on the set of the TV version of Cards on the Table with David Suchet as Poirot. None of the actors played bridge at all. Someone else had trained them on the mechanics of the game, bidding in turn, cards in the middle, collecting tricks, and so on. (She was holiday during the filming, so I got the gig).
One actress wrote her bids in feint pencil on her score card. Another wanted some guidance on her bidding inflexion. I gave her what I thought the audience would want (none of this Zero Tolerance (US) or Best Behaviour @ Bridge (England) stuff) … “One heart” confident, “Pass” bored, “Double” aggressive, etc. Standard 1930s country house bidding.
The key hand Christie constructed for when the murder took place is absolutely terrible.
Nov. 8, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I can’t like MK’s comment enough. The ACBL may not use Stop cards any more, but East is still required to pause for ‘10’ seconds. If he looked like he was thiking of bidding, good for him - you wouldn’t want him drumming his fingers and looking round the room, would you?
Oct. 11, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
“The Bridgemate software does not check that the card is in the hand of the opening leader.”

It can if you want it to; the feature has been used for at least a year on Bridgemates at Richmond Bridge Club, the English Bridge Union’s largest club. It’s not just about getting the correct lead spot (and improving the value of Nicholas’s statistics); results with mid-entered declarers are caught, and the overal results wil need to be changed less often.
Oct. 4, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I watched an interesting board from Orlando on BBO (grand slam makes if the defence don't take their ace of clubs at trick one) and went to see what had happened at all the other tables. I noticed that the lead card shown was sometimes incorrect, almost certainly the correct suit, but a card not held by the hand on lead.
There is a feature on some scoring boxes that will check, at the time the result is entered, that the lead is valid. Obviously not being used in Orlando.
Sept. 27, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Excellent! That’s another 7 hours of my life taken care of; those chores will have to wait. (And just look at all the smoking.)
Aug. 26, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Michael: my partner studied his hand for about 10 seconds - yes … because my Stop card was still on the table. I agree it might have been more of a problem if I had taken away my Stop card after two seconds, at about the same time as LHO passed.

There was a little more to it than that. As LHO reached for his bidding box I indicted the Stop card. He smirked, shrugged and passed anyway. My leaving the Stop card on the table and my partner’s 10 second thought were an unrehearsed joint response to LHO’s behaviour. RHO, when told of the reason for my partner’s ‘hesitation’, said we were being pedantic. Was that enough of a Z-T insult for us to call the director?
Aug. 18, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
A very similar situation cropped up recently. I displayed the Stop card (still required in England) and opened a weak 2S. LHO passed almost immediately. My partner studied his cards studiously. I picked up the Stop card after about 7 or 8 seconds. My partner carried on thinking for a couple of seconds and passed. RHO, with a fair hand, passed, and was a bit upset when my partner put down a balanced 7 count. My partner said his bid was about 10 seconds after my bid, and so was in tempo. We offered to call the director.
My partner says that the next time it happens to him, he will play HIS Stop card and say ‘Stopping’ before having his mandated in-tempo think.
Aug. 14, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The way I teach it, diamonds are linked to a good suit; you would only wear your diamonds with a good suit. ©️ My female students have no problem understanding this.
May 25, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
It has been standard practice in England for at least 10 years (I reckon) and works very well. People took to it pretty quickly and now it's automatic. There were few, if any, grumbles when it was launched, because it's such a sensible idea. I really miss it when I play in the States.
April 4, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
This is information from the EBU website:

Four teams entered the trials; the winning team would qualify for the England team for the European Championships; the third pair would be selected.

Each team played 24 boards against the other three teams, in a round robin, and this format was repeated three times. So, nine 24 board matches in total, VPed separately.

Team A played a substitute for the first round robin. At the end of the first round robin A was leading with 49.65 VPs, B was on 44.51 (C on 22.04, D on 3.8).

The four teams then played the other two round robins with the players who were originally entered. The scores for the second and third round robins combined were: A: 71.96, B: 72.21 (C: 38.68, D: 57.15).

The totals for the whole event were: A: 121.61, B: 116.72 (C: 60.72, D: 60.95).

Team A (including the three matches where they had a substitute) won ‘the trials’ if all three round robins are counted. Team B won the two-thirds of the trials where the entered teams played.

The Cross-IMP tables have the leading pairs in the order B1, A1, A2 (the threesome), B2. (The substitute topped the Cross-IMP table!)

The web-site says (as of 14:30) that Team B have been declared winners of the trials and a third pair will be invited in due course.

Those are the facts according to the website. What it doesn’t say, and I don’t know, is if the selection process that would be used, following the acceptance of the substitute for part of the event, was explained to the players at any time before the end of the trials.
March 8, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Thanks to all who replied - on BridgeWinners and directly to me.
Feb. 26, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I have played in England for over 40 years and never sorted my hand. I only started shuffling it when it became a law/rule.

There was an excellent (tongue in cheek) Bols tip which was “Shuffle your cards”. If you have a spade fit and are thinking of bidding 6S, have a look at the first three cards played at the other table. The example given was something like: if they were DA, SQ, DK, you know the spade finesse lost at trick 2. But if they were DA, SQ, SJ, you know the finesse succeeded.
Dec. 16, 2017
1 2
.

Bottom Home Top