Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Steve Bloom
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 189 190 191 192
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
This line is absolutely clear-cut. I can't imagine not playing clubs from the top. I basically need one of two good things to happen - 2-2 clubs or a finesse. I try those in order.

Assuming South wins the third club, and finds the diamond shift, I have to judge whether South started with at least five diamonds, and play for a double squeeze, or take the heart finesse. Most likely, I take the heart finesse. I certainly won't play North to hold 5-5-2-1 shape. If North shows up with six spades, I have some guessing to do.
4 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
This hand looks very familiar. Didn't this show up in a World Championship? I vaguely remember Martel involved, but don't recall if he timed the play properly, or punished a declarer who messed it up.
4 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I play declarer for a hand like KQ9x Axx AKx xxx.
4 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If I thought partner held an ace, I would let the queen win, and get some more information. If I think declarer has the two aces, then I have to win the first heart and attack spades or clubs, before the diamonds are unblocked.

Essentially, I committed myself when I won that heart.
18 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yep. Low spade looks best, and hope South flies ace. You have no legitimate set with this hand.
Feb. 23
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Helps to know methods. If declarer would rebid three hearts on many hands missing another ace, then a spade is clear.

If not, then we need declarer to hold a hand like Axx KJxxxxx A xx. A club always sets the contract. A spade allows South to jump ace and cut our communication.
Feb. 23
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
On the first hand - it looks like normal technique to return the spade ten at trick two. That keeps the entries in the spades fluid, and avoids that squeeze.

As the play went, West, looking at no club honor, would always cash out. So West marked the club king.

At teams, should declarer guess the clubs? Trickier. But, again, West would always cash out, and lock declarer in hand, if West had nothing in clubs. So, again, the club king is marked.
Feb. 21
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I always thought three hearts was reserved for a two-loser suit, like QJ109xxx or KJ109xxx.

I like five hearts over three. Nothing to cue-bid, and so long, good hearts. Partner will likely play me for something like xx KQJxxxx xx xx. Close enough. If the spade singleton is the key, too bad. If not, then I have given partner a very good picture of my hand.

Four spades is also fine, if partner reads it. But might I also bid four spades on hands with more stuff in the minors - say, x KQJxx QJxx Qxx?
Feb. 19
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Easy to answer, but, perhaps, expensive.

(1) Hire a teaching pro. Ask that pro to point out every area of your game that needs work, and to make suggestions.

Just like any other sport. If you want to work on your backhand in tennis, you pay the local pro and you take lessons. Bridge is no different. Don't skimp. There are plenty of “teachers” who aren't that good. You need a real expert to analyze your game in depth.

(2) Buy, and read, a ton of books.

(3) Ask questions. Unlike other sports, you can play against Rodwell in a regional or sectional. You can't play against Federer. So ask Rodwell how you should have bid this hand you just finished, or how he guessed that key queen.
Feb. 19
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
How about a novel approach. They all essentially show 's!

(That's how we play them for #1).
Feb. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I prefer middle from three. Problems arise from any holding. If you play the ten from J10 and from QJ10, partner won't know about the queen, which is more important. If you play Q from KQ and from QJ10, partner won't know about the king, the most important card. So I like implying exactly one higher honor, leaving the lower honors unknown.

Virtually equivalent - always play the highest when splitting. I prefer second highest, because it is often correct to rise king without a touching honor. It is sometimes right to rise queen with no touching honor, but less often. And so on down the list. So second highest seems to be slightly easier on partner.
Feb. 17
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Assuming declarer plays as advertised, and assuming the defenders are not total beginners, then everyone at the table knows declarer's hand, even dummy. I also don't see why clubs can't be 6-6.

No competent West would have any problem with Hx in hearts, or with Hxx. With no heart honor, then West is worried that declarer has guessed right, and will wonder what spot card would most look like Hx in hearts.

In other words, West actually has a problem facing xx or xxx in hearts. West has no problem at all facing Hx or Hxx. So, getting a hitch, I would duck the second heart.
Feb. 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Looks like you are right. They removed that section. Who needs full disclosure in this day and age? Lie, obscure, and then argue your case in front of some Olympic panel.
Feb. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Wink wink wink.
Feb. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In ACBL land, you check a box regarding psyche frequency, and, if frequent, describe. So, yes.

Opponents can also ask about, say, third seat style.
Feb. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
A psyche is a psyche. If you psyche frequently, you must make sure that your opponents know that. If you wait for a hand like this, in third seat, and only at favorable, then you have never psyched, and never will, so don't worry about it.
Feb. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
That seems like the normal play in the suit, but West kindly announced a poor doubleton in spades, so West can't have the spade king.

Very, very, helpful methods!
Feb. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Careful! I gave this out, after the game, as a play problem, on a high spade lead (6 hearts by North, after a take-out double by the South hand). Their line: Ruff the spade, draw trumps, ruff out diamonds and spades, …

Oops. One entry short! The correct line is one round of trumps, diamond ace, diamond ruff, trump to dummy, etc.
Feb. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Sorry, but I am suspicious by nature. Are you sure that North was the only one acting on UI? I can't, for the life of me, come up with any other sane explanation for that four spade call.
Feb. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Wrong-siding a contract is an incredibly minor consideration. True, 3NT by North might be 100% while 3NT by South only 50%, but still, you haven't lost that finesse yet.

Playing in 3NT with a stopper like xxx facing x, when six clubs is cold … No lucky finesse will help that.

First goal: Bid accurately to the best contract. Second goal: Get to that contract from the best side. If goal 2 gets in the way of goal 1, change your priorities.
Feb. 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 189 190 191 192
.

Bottom Home Top