Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Stu Goodgold
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
A couple of years ago I was on lead against 3NT, holding KTx,xx,xxx,KJT9x. The auction was uncontested: 1-2;2N-3N. I made the normal lead of the J. But the only lead that sets 3N was the K, because dummy had: Jx,xxx,AQJTxx,Ax and declarer had: ATxx,AKJxx,xx,Qx. (approximately).

A trap of the Q when it isn't a singleton.

Only Minnie Bottoms in Frank Stewart's bridge columns would find this lead! (She has poor eyesight and mixes up her Ks and Js.)
Nov. 17, 2018
Stu Goodgold edited this comment Nov. 17, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I could not find an edit button or any other method for modifying an article once it is posted. You have to live with what you put there, and can only correct by comments or removing the post and starting a new one.
Nov. 17, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The most frequent use is the 1-1 sequence, which is explained as often showing a weaker hand not wanting to wrong side 1NT.
Nov. 17, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Rndy asked: “is the BOG really 125 people?”

The BoG is made up of 1st and 2nd alternates and 3 BoG members elected from each of the 25 districts. That adds up to 125. Plus, all Past Presidents of the BoD (that are not currently on the BoD) and all Past Chairs of the BoG are lifetime members of the BoG. Last I noticed that was about 30 more people.

However, there are quite a few vacancies of BoG members from various districts. And attendance is not mandatory at each NABC. I would estimate that at a typical BoG meeting (1st Sunday at 10am of each NABC) maybe 70-80 BoG members are in attendance.

BTW, the bill for that continental breakfast along with the facilities support for the 2 hr BoG meeting runs about $4000.
Nov. 17, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The $516K probably includes the ACBL President's allocation, as well as the expenses of all the other board members. Even so, that does sound high. And this was the 990 form for 2016, where the president's budget has been reduced since your days on the BoD, Don.
Nov. 16, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Previously, I had discussed the ‘one person, one vote’ proposal that failed the BoG vote. That could be approximated by having a board of 9 members, each selected by about 18,000 members. You could divide the ACBL into 9 zones:
Florida, California, Canada, and 6 US zones: NE, SE, North-central, , South-central (with Mex), NW, and SW.
Nov. 16, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
There are other factors which no one has mentioned that might be the most important. They are enthusiasm and willingness to work.
That goes further than any expertise a candidate might possess.
Not everyone has the time or energy to devote to the task, and new candidates might not know exactly what the position entails.

Yes, you can argue that only the most willing would promote themselves as candidates for the board, but how do the voters determine which candidate is the best.
Nov. 16, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Per the current ACBL Bylaws, the chair of the BoG sits on the BoD with voice but no vote. Perhaps the thought was that this should continue in some form even with a smaller BoD. Just my estimation of someone else's thought process.
Nov. 16, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Size plays a factor in that discussions involve more points of view and more commentary. Whether members of the BoD are competent depends on how diligent those electing them are.

I would suggest unit boards should not the ones electing members of the BoD, but that's the way the bylaws are currently written.
Most unit board members have little idea what goes on at the ACBL level, nor do they care very much. They do care what the ACBL does that affects their bailiwick, and having a DD that will inform them of what the BoD does that changes the way they run their unit and clubs goes a long ways to satisfying their needs.

Having a DD who can communicate effectively with their constituents is a big plus for getting elected. It is also a genuine positive trait for the job.
Nov. 15, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I made a BoG proposal back in 2010 for the BoG to have a committee determine a system for ‘one person, one vote’ whereby the voting for DD would be by zone and each zone would have approximately the same number of members. It generated a one of the largest discussions from the floor, but eventually was defeated in a close vote.
Nov. 15, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Julian, the impression you have garnered on Bridge Winners about the ACBL is skewed in my opinion. I truly doubt the average ACBL member is nearly as vehemently opposed to the ACBL governing bodies as the typical BW poster is.

You stated you have been active in bridge governance for many years and at all levels. Not many of the anti-ACBL posters on BW have ever served in that capacity. It is easy to grouse about an organization when you stay on the sidelines and haven't observed it from within.

Some time ago I took a poll on BW, and only about 10% of the responders ever served on a unit, district, or ACBL board. That is higher than the average for ACBL members, but still rather pathetic considering the extent to which BW posters carp about the way things are run.
Nov. 13, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Coming from the west coast, flying into Providence required 3 legs on many flights and some others were red-eyes. I opted to fly into Boston non-stop on a red-eye and take the train to Providence. But the train schedule was inconvenient, so I took a bus and got in earlier. Took the train going back to Boston though.

I did live in Rhode Island for 3 years decades ago, but rarely made it to Providence. That city has definitely improved since the '70s. Back then I lived in Newport and there was little reason to go elsewhere, except occasionally to Boston.
Nov. 12, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The director still has to determine if the mistake was intentional or not. If intentional, then the director should issue a PP, which may be as simple as a warning. Fortunately, most of these mistakes are unintentional, but a director should still be wary for the occasional intentional one perpetrated by someone not up on the laws and ethics of the game.
Nov. 11, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
John, according to Law 27D as director you are allowed to adjust the score if you think the NOS was damaged had the IB not been made. To quote part of Law 27D: the director “should seek to recover as nearly as possible the probable outcome of the board had the insufficient bid not occurred.”

Looks like it is left up to your judgment as director.

However, I don't think it is rare that the auction ends up the same as one without the infraction. For example, in your (1) 1 case, corrected to 2, it might be the overcaller had an opening hand with 6 diamonds. The 1 overcall might have been intended as an opening bid (and most often is), which might be the same as a 2 legitimate overcall.
Nov. 9, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The time is out of joint is but a result of Horatio suggesting “Break we up our watch…”.

Apparently watches were rather delicate in those days.

(With apologies to Richard Armour.)
Nov. 9, 2018
Stu Goodgold edited this comment Nov. 9, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
As some others have noted, it depends on your partnership agreements. Personally, I prefer to make the support Dbl whenever I hold 3 in partner's suit. I guess there are extreme distributions where I might not, but so far I haven't held one where I support dbl was available.

Support dbls fit my philosophy of bidding: with 2 or more feasible choices, make the lowest available bid or call that describes your hand.
Nov. 7, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Not quite. Law 72C states an adjustment can be made by the TD “if the Director determines that an offender could have been aware at the time of his irregularity that it could well damage the non-offending side…”

“Could have been aware” is the key phrase as pointed out in Ruling the Game. In the example where declarer leads the A from dummy without a dummy entry, it is clear he could have been aware that was the only way to get a trick. So the TD adjusts the score.

In the OPs case, it is not clear that the insufficient bidder of 1 could have known it would lead to their side gaining an advantage. It is quite early in the auction and it would be hard to predict where it was going.

Now, Law 27 states that had the 1 bid not been accepted and subsequently corrected to 2, then by Law 27D if the TD judges the non-offending side was damaged, he can award an adjusted score.

But by accepting the insufficient bid, Law 27D does not apply (nor does Law 16 or Law 26).
Nov. 7, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yes, a regional tournament manager/chair is usually the one responsible for taking the cash receipts for the day and getting them deposited in a bank account. This can be unsettling to a person carrying around that much cash, especially at night.
Nov. 6, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Well that is not what you said before. Did anyone verify that a change of your score could affect the standings in any way?
Nov. 4, 2018
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ed, I would think that in general any moot question of law does not warrant an effort to resolve it. I'll leave it to Ray or any other lawyer to support or refute that.

But you are right that the director should definitely explain why he declined a hearing.
Nov. 4, 2018
.

Bottom Home Top