Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Stu Goodgold
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
A double might find the bidding at the 3 level by the time it gets back to you. You will have a hard time bidding your club suit then. Tell partner where you live; you won't make 3N without help from partner, and if you side winds up on defense he will know what to lead. With none vul, this is not the time to push for a dubious game.
Oct. 29, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
May we assume you are not the player holding the West hand in this posting? I wonder because here and in other excellent articles you have posted, your detailed analysis often reaches a different conclusion than the actual bid or play. Are world class experts under such pressure at the table that they fail to find the best line many times?
Oct. 29, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
As Yuan says, having all invitational hands go through 2C is an easy way to remember that 2N directly is not an invite. As for having the 4th seat getting an opportunity to come into the auction after a 2C bid, he really doesn't know what the follow up is going to be after opener relays to 2D, so there is a big risk if bidding in a live auction. If responder has an invitation, then your side has the majority of the values, and 4th seat could go for a number.
Oct. 29, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
As others have said, I would open 2C for constructive purposes. It is actually against ACBL regulations to open 2C for the sole purpose of interfering with the opposition.

My most memorable hand (from a 1983 regional pairs event) was
Kx,-,AKxxxxxxxxx,-. I opened 2C since we were playing step controls, and I would quickly know whether slam was feasible or to just bid game. Partner bid 3D, showing 5 controls, and subsequently but errantly bid spades, at which point I bid 7D. She had HA and CA with a diamond void. RHO figured a spade lead was no good and led a heart.

By opening 2C and partner bidding diamonds, I can lay claim to the world's best ever dummy support in tournament bridge!
Oct. 24, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Would have to see the hand. Yes, the basic odds to pick up the trump are about 75%, but then there is the chance of a ruff to contend with. Plus it may play better in 6N than 6M.
Oct. 24, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I would have bid 4S directly over 3H. This hand is suit oriented and if partner rebids 3N I would take the safe route with 4S anyway. With your auction, I would try 4N, which should be Keycard for hearts. Grand is still a possibility opposite Qxxxx,Qxxxx,x,Ax. It would be difficult to find out if partner has the SQ though, unless playing more sophisticated methods than RKCB.
Oct. 24, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
3H is bad, but 5H is abominable. If 3H is indeed preemptive, then 5H is likely to go for 800 or even more when doubled. I would have bid a descriptive 2H as East, and never considered bidding over 4S.
Oct. 16, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Allan: but partner may instead hold an imperfect middling or even maximum hand - KQJxx, QJxx,KQ,Qx. At 5H you are down 1 off the top. Of course, with that hand, partner would no problem doubling in tempo. So you have the UI that partner doesn't have that hand, which makes 5H much safer. Personally, I would roll back 5H if it made.
Oct. 16, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
And if 4S were Kickback, then you would respond 5H (2 with the HQ). 5S by partner now would be the King ask.
Oct. 15, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Khokan, actually the Law does comes close to saying that. In close decisions such as this one, you must consider that others of your caliber might not do the same thing. Here a number of people say Pass. If you bid 4H with the notion that you would have done it without the hesitation, that is viewed as a self-serving rationalization, and you are not considering the law. Plus if the director decides to adjust the score, you will get the worse of it or the table result.
Oct. 13, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Steve, I might agree partner has a 9 loser or better hand on average. But where did you get the 2/3 of the time his values don't help our long suits? On average partner rates to have 2.5 diamonds and 5 clubs. That's closer to 1/2 the time rather than 2/3.

As for bidding game, partner's hitch surely indicates more than normal values, so the UI indicates 8 losers or less. Looks like you are restricted to Pass because of that.
Oct. 13, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You have a much better hand than expected by your 1 level dbl.
Depending on who is defending, you are likely to get a heart lead by West, who is most likely holding QJxxx and expecting East may have HA and out. Hearts may even be 5-4 with partner having Hxx, and expecting 2 losers there (he didn't bid 4H after all). It is a guess of course, but if partner has 10 winners you should make 6 with the heart lead.
Oct. 12, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I don't bid 1N with a stiff in partner's major not quite 100% but around 85%, I will raise with 3 rather than bid 1N if I don't have the other major stopped, even with a small doubleton in the other major. With (3-1)-4-5 I open 1C unless diamonds are much better in strength than the clubs. I will rebid 2C if partner bids my singleton. I bid 1N only rarely, when I have an honor in partner's major and the other major stopped, and mediocre clubs.
And I play Walsh with all my partners.
Oct. 12, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
It's close between 4D and 3S, but I opt for the lower bid. Your hand has too much slam potential because you have controls in every side suit; 4D would imply 3 possible losers in the black suits. After 3S, if partner cues 4C, I have an easy 4D bid.
Oct. 12, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I can sympathize with North for not bidding 4C directly in a national event. Give South xx,Qxx,Kx,AKxxxx and 3N is a better contract than 5C. Even so, South needs to know about North's primary club support, and 4C directly is the best way and maybe only chance to show it.
Oct. 12, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Andrew, are you going to discuss matchpt preempts in your next installment?
Oct. 11, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Platinum pts are a decent measure of an ability to compete with the strongest players around. It is very unlikely a B player will ever pick up many platinum pts. But not everyone plays in NABCs regularly. Blue Ribbon queues are another measure, but they have become diluted with Gold Rush pairs and Strat B winners.

Overall, masterpts as a measure of skill are most lacking for the younger up and coming players. It would be nice to have a rating system ala the USCF for juniors, but would be a very difficult concept to get through the ACBL BOD.
Oct. 3, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
A couple of years ago I sat in on a C&CC meeting. They meet Monday morning of every NABC for about 2 hours. At one end of the table was Hamman, at the other end was Meckstroff; they were the most vocal. Other recognizable names were also there.
For putting in their time reviewing suggestions and sitting in on a 2 hour meeting, each member gets one free session at the NABC.
Not much compensation, especially for the pros who don't pay their own entries anyway.

Sorry to hear you have such a low opinion of these top players.
Oct. 3, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
With odd/even it is easy to give a murky signal - play a relatively high odd card. I tell my partners who agree to play odd/even that it means I not all that fond of the suit. Another way to play a murky odd/even is to discard an even card with a preference to a suit that is logically undesirable. You do best with the discard that can be viewed by partner as having multiple choices among the odds or evens.

But this is somewhat off-topic; Kit and Mike's discussion involves carding when following suit, not when discarding.
Oct. 2, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I just got my Oct ACBL Bulletin (after posting the above comment). I thought it was more than a coincidence that your unusual insufficient bid question was the same as one mentioned in passing in Letters to the Editor. After double checking the letter, it appears the author and you are one and the same. You had to have written to the editor over a month ago. Thanks for waiting before posting it here on Bridge Winners.

Glad to hear you really enjoyed your first national!
Oct. 2, 2012
.

Bottom Home Top