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All comments by Sue Munday
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As an ACBL employee who cares deeply about the organization and bridge, I have to speak out. Please know up front that I am not writing in any official capacity and my opinions are mine and mine alone.

I’m angry. I strongly resent the implication that this heinous, unsigned letter speaks for me.

To describe Headquarters staff as “marking time” and “doing the minimum to get by” is an outright lie. Those words may well describe the perpetrators of whatever scheme this letter is trying to set in motion, but let me assure you that Headquarters employees – at least the ones who actually work in Horn Lake – are dedicated to our jobs and devoted to serving ACBL members. We give more than just our time; we are passionate and concerned and involved and we bend over backwards to meet our members’ needs.

That spirit of service comes from the top – from Robert Hartman.

Robert relies on us to work together as a team, not a bunch of isolated departments. It sounds like the writer of this malicious diatribe isn’t enjoying the team aspect of the ACBL employee family (Field Operations as well as Headquarters). That assumes, of course, this letter even came from an employee. We don’t really know, do we?

The proposed solution is a joke. And that’s enough said on that subject.

Bridge Winners is to be applauded for refusing to further propagate this … well … this crap. Even dressed up in dozens of pretty little disclaimers, this anonymous letter is not a “conversation starter.” It’s destructive and yet another distraction that has us chasing our tails when we should be moving forward.

What is certain is that whoever is skulking in the shadows masterminding this little mutiny does not have the best interests of the ACBL at heart, nor does (s)he care a whit about what’s good for bridge.

In fact, I'm not so sure it's an employee at all. We don’t know because (s)he was too cowardly to take ownership of these words – to be accountable for the sentiments and ideas expressed in this letter.

It isn’t a whistle-blower action because, as David Hemmer noted above, it has nothing to do with criminal actions or safety issues. No. This is an employee (or is it?) taking advantage of social media and people who’ll believe anything they read to bitch about their boss. While it saddens me that someone I work with (allegedly) would stoop to these depths, I hope they are chased out of hiding and fired, because the ACBL doesn’t need this kind of cancer.

Robert’s door is open – it’s always been open – to employees who have something to discuss.

That’s my informed take from inside the building, and I’ll gladly sign my name.

Sue Munday
March 19, 2016
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On Wednesday and Thursday, NAP Flight A will be held in the Silver Baron Ballroom AB. That's on the mezzanine level of the Silver Legacy.

The Pre-Bulletin includes playing sites for the first three days as well as other information: http://web2.acbl.org/nabc/RenoPre-Bulletin.pdf

(Edited to add link)
Feb. 29, 2016
Sue Munday edited this comment Feb. 29, 2016
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Matt Smith has written an article for the February Bridge Bulletin explaining this change.
Jan. 4, 2016
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How serendipitous for bridge that this gifted (sports!) writer picked up this story and ran with it.

Thorough research provided a solid foundation for his brilliant interviewing skills. He conversed with such ease with all the right people and thanks to Boye the Sheriff, Bob “Doyle Brunson/Dan Marino”) Hamman, Jeff, Kit and Chris – that “irrepressibly logical creature,” (damn, I wish I'd written that), the story was accurate, upbeat and full of color. Meanwhile, on the other side of the conversation, it seems that Walters is interested in learning how to play, so good job guys.

Look for the print version of the story to hit the magazine stands within the next couple of weeks.
Sept. 23, 2015
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Historical perspective FWIW: The Wagar Women's KO teams – despite format and name changes – is the longest running women’s team event on the ACBL calendar. It was first contested in 1933.
Aug. 12, 2015
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Double?
July 31, 2015
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Who?
March 21, 2015
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Memorial services for Jeff will be held on Monday, Jan. 5 at:

Memorial Park Funeral Home
5668 Poplar Ave.
Memphis TN 38119
901-767-8930

Visitation will be from 10–11:30 a.m.; the memorial service will begin at 11:30 a.m.
Dec. 31, 2014
Sue Munday edited this comment Dec. 31, 2014
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I'm sure everyone recognizes humor, right? – especially when it comes in the form of poetry by Edna St. Vincent Millay. Here's her take. Bear in mind that this was written circa 1924 or so? – long, long before the days of political correctness.

“I Like Americans”

I like Americans.
You may say what you will, they are the nicest people in the world.

They sleep with their window open.
Their bathtubs are never dry.
They are not grown up yet. They still believe in Santa Claus.
They are terribly in earnest,
But they laugh at everything.
They know that one roll does not make a breakfast.

The Italians are nice.
But they are not so nice as the Americans.
They have been told that they live in a warm climate,
And they refuse to heat their houses.
They are forever sobbing Puccini,
And if you walk in the street alone, somebody pinches you.

I like Americans.
They give you the matches free.

The Austrians are nice,
But they are not so nice as the Americans.
They eat sausages between the acts at the opera,
But they make you go out into the snow to smoke.
They are gentle and friendly. They will walk ten blocks out of their way to show you your way,
But they serve you paper napkins at the table.

The Hungarians are nice,
But they are not so nice as the Americans.
They make beautiful shoes
Which are guaranteed to squeak for a year.
Their native tongue is like a typewriter in the next room, and every word beginning with the shift key.

I like Americans
They are so ridiculous.

In the city the French are delightful.
They kiss in the cafes and dine on the sidewalks.
Their rudeness is more gracious than other people’s courtesy,
They are afraid of water.
They drink it mixed with wine.
They swim with wings,
And they bathe with an atomizer,
Their conception of a sport suit is a black taffeta gown, long gloves with a fringe on, a patent leather handbag, and a dish-mop dog.
In the country they are too funny for words.

I like Americans.
They carry such pretty umbrellas.
The “Avenue de l’Opera” on a rainy day is just an avenue, on a rainy day,
But Fifth Avenue on a rainy day is an old-fashioned garden under a shower.

The French are a jolly lot.
Their cities have no traffic regulations,
And no speed limit.
And if you get run over, you have to pay a fine for getting in the way.
But they have no ear drums.
Paris is the loveliest city in the world,
Until she opens her mouth.
Should the French go forth to battle armed only with their taxi horns, they would drive all before them.

I like Americans.
They are the only men in the world, the sight of whom in their shirt-sleeves is not rumpled, embryonic, and agonizing.
They were belts instead of suspenders.

The French are nice,
But they are not so nice as Americans.
They wear the most charming frocks in he world
And the most awkward underclothes.
Their shoes are too short.
Their ankles are too thick.
They are always forgetting where they put their razors.
They have no street-corner shoe-shining place where a man can be a king for five minutes every day.
Nor any Sunday supplement.
Their mailboxes are cleverly hidden slits in the wall of a cigar store.
They put all their cream into cheese.
Your morning cup of chickory is full of boiled strings.
If you want butter with your luncheon, they expect you to order radishes,
And they insist on serving vegetables as if they were food.

I like Americans.
They make a lot of foolish laws,
But at least their cigarettes are not rolled by the government.
They are always risking their lives to save a minute.
The pavement under their feet is red-hot.

They are the only people in the world who can eat their soup without a sound as of the tide coming in.
They seal their bread hygienically wrapped.
The Europeans sell it naked.
They carry it under their arm,
Drop it and pick it up,
Beat the horse with it,
And spank the children.
They deliver it at your apartment. You find it lying outside your door on the door mat.

And European hotels are so hateful and irritating.
There is never an ash-tray in your bedroom;
Nor a wastebasket nor a cake of soap.
No sweet little cake of soap all sealed in paper!
Not even a sliver left behind by a former guest.
No soap.
No soap at all.

Then the railroad system.
Especially in France.
Have to get there forty-five minutes ahead of train time or stand in the aisle all day.
Pay for every pound of trunk.
Never a soul in sight who knows anything about anything.
No place to sit.
No place to powder up.

I like Americans.
They let you play around in the Grand Central all you please.
Their parks are not locked at sunset,
And they always have plenty of paper bags.

The English are nice,
But they are not so nice as the Americans.
They wear much too much flannel.
No matter where they go, they remain at home.
They are nice. They keep the tea set at the office,
But the Americans keep the dish pan in the music room.

The English are an amusing people.
They are a tribe of shepherds, inhabiting a small island off the coast of France.
They are simple and genial folk,
But they have one idiosyncrasy,
They persist in referring to their island as if it were the mainland.

The Irish are nice,
But they are not so nice as the Americans.
They are always rocking the boat.

I like Americans.
You may say what you will, they are the nicest people in the world.
Aug. 26, 2014
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I can't stand it any longer. Steve, Boye – who's Precious (I realize you both are) and why?
Aug. 15, 2014
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Thanks, Debbie, for keeping us up to date!
Aug. 14, 2014
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Don't think it was a typo, Merril. I'm pretty sure that was Greg's understanding of the metric system.
July 18, 2014
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“Second-worst score” begs the question …
July 15, 2014
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Great pictures, Debbie – I particularly love the photos of you and Kevin. Looks like you have fun. Congratulations on your programs' huge success and thank you for what you're doing to bring the game to younger players.
July 9, 2014
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1 first, no question for me. Second bid is easy if partner bids. But if partner passes, it's largely dependent on what 3 is – noncompetitive/blocking, I'd double; but if it is a game try, I'd pass.
July 7, 2014
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Thanks to all of BW for your magnificent contributions to The Longest Day: Guys for hopping onto the auction block (repeatedly in a couple of cases), and Polly for organizing everything. You made it really fun!

Thanks, too, to everyone who raised money for local club activities yesterday through auctions and raffles, sponsorships and numerous other contributions (I'm thinking about one anonymous gentleman, in particular, who so generously sponsored my longest day at the club). Raising money for Alzheimer's Association makes us all winners! Well, except maybe you, Greg Humphreys … You see, I own your devilishly handsome, Academy Award-winning ass for an hour of Speedball, you poor thing.
June 22, 2014
Sue Munday edited this comment June 22, 2014
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Hi Larry, Thanks for jumping in the well to field our questions. You are most definitely one of the good guys of the game, and it's refreshing to hear your views.

Do you have a book or special project in the works? Given your many repeat students, how do you keep your classes fresh? Do you find that your cruise and country club students are interested in duplicate (vs social) bridge? and do your lessons more or less encompass both forms of the game?

I used to love playing against you and David – not for the result, mind you, but for the sheer fun, and your vugraph commentary partnership was nothing short of Abbott and Costello-level entertaining.

Kibitzing you and Steve would be an absolute dream. And, if I may add, your game together would produce tons of material for your monthly Bridge Bulletin column. I know you worry about that : )
June 13, 2014
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In the hand of Barry G's juniors, buy it or belt it was essentially an expedited relay system to 7NT doubled.
June 13, 2014
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“Little Dorrit”? Did you lose a bet, Michael?
April 29, 2014
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I've sort of been going with Levinstein in my notes. Not to be confused with Frankenstein, which would actually be much cooler. Too late to consider a name change?

Get the book out of the drawer, Bobby. You're awesome, this edition of The Well is awesome, Steve is awesome, Jill is amazing, Rufus is fun and your stories … the places you've been in and out of the bridge world, the people you've played with and against, the friends you've made and OMG the fans you have – hey man! get writing!
April 11, 2014
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