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Bridge Winners Profile for Ken Rhodes

Ken Rhodes
Ken Rhodes
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Basic Information

Member Since
June 15, 2011
Last Seen
28 minutes ago
Member Type
Bridge Player
about me

Been playing the game for a long time--over 50 years. Started fast--studied every book I could get hold of. Baltimore, then Washington, then Nofolk, VA. There were lots of good players, and I loved the challenge of the game.

In the intervening years my life took unexpected turns. I married (well) and helped raise a family.  I helped start a consulting company that had a nice run of success. I retired, and I lost my wife, but fate smiled on me and I married (well) again. All in all, I'm one very lucky guy.

Now I'm a different person, in a different world. I'm older, my environment is a small town, and I enjoy the social aspects of the game. My first wife, Pat, loved bridge and was very good at it. My second wife, Biddy, loves bridge too. Although she isn't nearly so good at it as Pat was, she's a competitive person. So now my greatest enjoyment in duplicate bridge is helping Biddy win. When we win, her smile would light up Rockefeller Center at Christmas.  What could be better than that?

Country
United States of America

Bridge Information

Favorite Bridge Memory
(1) A year (1962) of Student Union bridge at University of Maryland (2) St Louis Open Pairs w/Steve Robinson 1963
Bridge Accomplishments
none
Regular Bridge Partners
none
Member of Bridge Club(s)
The Villages DBC for six years. Now relocated to Waynesboro, VA, DBC.
Favorite Tournaments
Any local sectional with good food and friendly folks.
Favorite Conventions
Flattery
ACBL Ranking
None
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Matchpoint Defense Problem
Suppose partner has the Q. If it's a doubleton, how many tricks will we take? Looks to me like it's 1 spade, 2 hearts, and one diamond. And if partner has Qxx, but declarer has 9x, we still only get 2 heart tricks. And in either case when ...
Video footage of kids playing bridge?
Sue, I don't remember seeing your name here before, so it's possible that you're not a regular, and therefore don't know about Debbie Rosenberg and the Silicon Valley Youth (SiVY) Bridge Organization. You might try contacting Debbie with this request. It's possible she has just ...
Mark Jones's bidding problem: AJ987 64 3 AKT87
??? If partner has K AK all he needs is 2-1 spade split. If partner has K A A it's the same. If partner has five baby spades it's not unreasonable to hope he might have A A and either one of the red kings, which means all he ...
Punch the Chump
??? Kit said East split his QJ when declarer led from the dummy.
Donald Lurie's bidding problem: KQT QJ82 93 AK62
Although you hadn't discussed it with your partner, were you concerned that a bid of 3 by you would have gotten you in trouble? Partner had made an invitational bid, so he couldn't make some slam try past 4. If you were thinking of bidding 4 ...
Bidding recommendations please
David, for accurate slam bidding, that sounds like a useful adjunct to Blackwood. If 4NT asks your partner for Aces, then perhaps you could use 5 to ask your LHO for Kings. The answer, as in a Keycard ask, would be the specific King held. If no King is ...
Is this "Reverse" Forcing?
Alternative philosophical interpretation: In bridge, there is always an undistributed middle.
Is this "Reverse" Forcing?
@Todd (and others): I think Craig meant to say "a much higher maximum..." In other words, if it went 1 (P) P, responder has a very low upper limit, while after 1 (2) P, responder has a possibility of a decent hand, especially since he might have ...
Lin Li's bidding problem: A AJ8 KQ8 Q87543
I voted as David, for the same reason. However, whichever you choose (1 or 1NT) has potential strong disadvantages. I would be very interested to hear from some respondents on what they will do next round: If you opened 1, what's your plan after partner responds 1 ...
Is this "Reverse" Forcing?
Suppose you had enough high card strength to consider your hand a traditional "reverse, forcing one round" opposite a partner who had kept your opening one bid alive with some response. If you had that high card strength, then in the given auction you would have reopened with a takeout ...
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