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Bridge Winners Profile for Nigel Guthrie

Nigel Guthrie
Nigel Guthrie
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Basic Information

Member Since
Nov. 8, 2011
Last Seen
6 hours ago
Member Type
Bridge Player
Country
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Bridge Information

Member of Bridge Club(s)
GBC
BBO Username
nige1
ACBL Ranking
None
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Can you have UI generated solely through your own actions?
I agree with most of the interpretations by Nigel Kearney, Richard Reitman, Max Schirenson, David Burn and Co. But I also agree with Ed Reppert that "the masters of the subtle schools are controversial, polymath". Bridge rules are so sophisticated that only a small flock of secretary birds seem to ...
Deep Finesse Can't Make It, But You Can
Win A. Ruff a . Lead a to K and A. Win the return (say a trump, with K). Ruff a , Cross to Q. Ruff a . Exit in . Win the return (K say). Exit in , hoping that LHO fails to crocodile-coup.
Deep Finesse Can't Make It, But You Can
Win A. Cash K. Ruff a . "Finesse" a (covering RHO's card). Ruff a . Cross to Q. Ruff a . Cash A, if you still have it, Exit in s. Winning when - RHO has A or - LHO has A singleton. - RHO was dealt e.g. Qx doubleton ...
A ruling conundrum
IMO, to avoid giving UI, you must always ask (In theory you could never ask -- but then you bid in the dark). Law-makers could change the law to mandate that you always ask. Or better, they could mandate that the you always explain partner's call, without prompting. IMO this ...
A ruling conundrum
West is entitled to ask and to think but these actions are UI to East. A poll might indicate that the UI suggests bidding (e.g. 3) over passing. If the director judges Pass to be a less successful logical alternative for East, then he might adjust to 3 ...
Do you always use the stop card, even when the opponents are very unlikely to bid?
Repeating myself: "Many players regularly break Bridge rules (especially rules about using UI, claims, pass cards, stop cards, and alert cards). But I don't know any who cheat deliberately. Some are ignorant of the rules. Some don't understand them. Many are careless about rules they dislike. Most are ...
Do you always use the stop card, even when the opponents are very unlikely to bid?
In practice, there is rarely an adverse ruling, even when flouting the rule gains advantage.
The problem is bigger than the Stop Card
I agree with Kathryn that Edgar Kaplan's "Old Black Magic" still casts its evil spell. Players regularly give and use unauthorised information. Rarely are infractions reported or ruled against.
Do you always use the stop card, even when the opponents are very unlikely to bid?
IMO, in the context of the rules of a game, if a rule stipulates that you should do something, then non-compliance is a practical but illegal option.
Do you always use the stop card, even when the opponents are very unlikely to bid?
Many rules (e.g. zero-tolerance) are regularly flouted and rarely enforced. IMO, that doesn't imply that they are bad rules.
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