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Bridge Winners Profile for Sergio Polini

Sergio Polini
Sergio Polini
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Basic Information

Member Since
Sept. 2, 2015
Last Seen
2 hours ago
Member Type
Bridge Player
Country
Italy

Bridge Information

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None
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European Championship Exact Location
I've updated my map: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1UqNq8WYbIF6B5Q1DC3IFWqUpH-0&usp=sharing
European Championship Exact Location
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1UqNq8WYbIF6B5Q1DC3IFWqUpH-0&usp=sharing HTH
Restricted Choice: One Last Time
Kurt Häggblom: The assumption is that you play a card because you have to, not because you choose to do so. Michael Kawalec: With "repulsion of equals" you don't have to make any assumptions. However, such an assumption could be useful. First example: AJ10 / xxx Declarer's goal is ...
Question about User Interface
You can also use Google. For example, there was an article "Suggestions on how to make a good bridge class on laptop without internet" by by Adriano Rodrigues, Sept. 11, 2015. Getting more and more content would be a long way... If you look for 'bridgewinners "bridge class"', you get ...
Restricted Choice: One Last Time
"they contrived a calculation that added the requirement that East and West must play randomly from equals" Actually, I think that Borel & Chéron explain better: the proper play by South does not depend on East's choice, South can and should ignore East's strategy (because he/she could misguess ...
Restricted Choice: One Last Time
Yes, I assume 50%, and finesse the 9, because I don't know. The third proof by Borel & Chévron (pp.389-390) is: [i]A[/i] = East held J, [i]P[/i]([i]A[/i]) prop. to 11 [i]B[/i] = East held Q, [i]P[/i]([i]B[/i]) prop ...
Restricted Choice: One Last Time
"If East would NEVER play the J from QJ" etc. Sure, but how could I know? Borel & Chéron say that South can know wether East is a poor player, but cannot know if he/she is naive (never the Q from QJ) or cunning (never the J from QJ). BTW ...
Restricted Choice: One Last Time
I think that Michael Kawalec is right. I find the first and clearest explanation of Restricted Choice in the [i]Théorie mathématique du bridge a la portée de tous[/i], by Èmile Borel and André Chèron -- even if it was not given that name. Here is their first example and ...
Restricted Choice: One Last Time
As to Pavlicek's example AQ9xxx / Kx where the King drops the J or 10 from your right, are you sure? According to SuitPlay (I'm a bit lazy ;-)) the odds are: Uxxx - P: 2.83% (U=unplayed equal, P=played equal) Uxx - Px: 10.17% Ux - Pxx: 10.17 ...
BZ - "People and their strange mannerisms"
"–" (long dash) replaced with "--" (double hyphen)
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