Join Bridge Winners
An E-book from Chennai
(Page of 3)

I was in Chennai, India last year. Not for the Bermuda Bowl, but for the Madras Music Festival, an annual event that happens just a few blocks away from the venue of the Bermuda Bowl in mid-December. It's the NABC equivalent for South Indian Classical Music (aka Carnatic Music), a two-week long festival that features top quality music and also showcases upcoming artists.

Amidst the almost non-stop Music (and food) festival I found time to catch up with my old friend and Bridge mentor, L. Subramanian. "LS" as he's known popularly used to write a weekly Bridge column for a prominent National newspaper, "The Hindu" until recently when they decided to discontinue the column. He's compiled a collection of interesting hands over a period of time into an e-book called "Delightful Bridge". In his foreword to the book, he writes:

"This book is aimed at improving the skill level of intermediate and advanced players to the next higher level in the ladder. The forty hands that             follow are taken from actual play. The bidding is essentially Standard American or in some cases Precision.

The deals are not meant to test your play, defense, or bidding skills in the game. Rather, they explain how the experts solved the problems as               they arose at the table, by their experience and class. If you are able to understand and appreciate the different techniques adopted by the               experts, you will certainly gain a new insight into their mind. This is bound to reflect in your performance too.

There is nothing esoteric about the deals. Barring a few, most of the hands require straightforward technique. They may be the bread and butter           type, but you will find they contain many useful ideas. Some of the deals may even puzzle the experts and the world-class as well."

Here's a sample from the book.

North
753
1065
AK42
Q106
South
AK8642
A43
73
K2
W
N
E
S
1
P
2
P
4
P
P
P

Contract: 4♠ by south. West leads the ♥2, lowest from odd. Plan the play.

Initial play: RHO plays the queen and you duck. You win RHO’s continuation of ♥8 with the ace. When you test the spades, LHO shows up with ♠ Q-J-9. How do you continue?

Initial assessment: You need to discard your heart loser on the ♣Q. So, your only chance lies in finding east with the club ace but without the jack.

1) Let us say you play the ♣K from hand at trick five with the idea of finessing the 10 later and discarding the heart loser on the ♣Q. RHO wins with the ♣A and plays a  to dummy’s ace. You cash ♦K and try to enter hand by ruffing a diamond to take the club finesse. Alas! LHO over ruffs and cashes a heart trick to set the contract.

2) Suppose you cross to the ♦A and play a club with the same idea as before. RHO steps up with the ♣A and returns a . This blocking play upsets declarer’s plan as it prevents declarer from enjoying the ♣Q. Again down one.You may wonder if there is a solution to the problem. What did declarer do? Foreseeing the danger in the above plays, declarer played the small club from hand and inserted the ten from dummy at trick five! There was no way the defenders could defeat him. The full hand was:

 

West
QJ9
KJ972
106
J83
North
753
1065
AK42
Q106
East
10
Q8
QJ985
A9754
South
AK8642
A43
73
K2
D

The book contains forty deals from actual play at the table. To purchase the book, click the following link:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/517431

The book is priced at $4/ and you can pay with Credit, Debit or PayPal. You'll need to register first, then pay and check-out the book.

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