Join Bridge Winners
Gargoyle Chronicles - Event 3, Match 8, Board 6
(Page of 2)

gargoyle

Board 6
Opponents vulnerable


Phillip
1092
Q543
J74
K82
RHO opens 1. I pass, and LHO passes. Partner reopens with a double. I bid 1, and partner bids 1NT, presumably showing a strong notrump. I pass, and RHO leads the 2 (fourth best).





Phillip
1092
Q543
J74
K82
Jack
Q543
AJ
A106
AQ75
W
N
E
S
1
P
P
X
P
1
P
1NT
P
P
P

Since responder won't have much to do on this deal, this would be a good time for West to falsecard on opening lead. So I wouldn't pay too much attention to the deuce against a good defender. However, I am pretty confident that Jack has four diamonds.

I play low from dummy, East plays the 8, and I win with the 10. I can't be sure where the diamond honors are. East might play the eight from Q8x to avoid giving me a second diamond trick if I have K10x instead of A10x.

I have two diamonds, three clubs, and one heart. All I need to do is to drive the K to come to seven tricks. I lead the J. West takes the king, and East follows with the 7.

West leads the K, settling the question of where the diamond honors are. (I suppose West might lead the king without the queen in an attempt to drill an entry into his partner's hand. But how would he even know his partner has the queen?) West has shown up with 8 HCP. If West is balanced, as seems likely, he has 4-6 additional HCP, leaving East with 3-5.

I play low from dummy, and East follows with the 5. I see no gain in winning this trick. The opponents can't cash enough tricks in spades to beat me. So I duck.

West shifts to the J. If West wanted to defend passively, he could just play another diamond. He must be looking for a source of tricks. He is hoping to find his partner with Axxxx and plans to take one heart, one diamond, one spade, and four clubs. There was no point in switching to a club on the previous round, since he needed a diamond to come to seven tricks.

What can I conclude about West's hand? For one thing, he is missing a spade honor. I know that because he thinks I have it. His partner could not have the A unless I had at least 4 HCP in spades. How many clubs does West have? The shift is more attractive from J10x than from a doubleton. If he has Jx and his partner has A109xx, I could always go up with dummy's king to block the suit. But maybe my making a mistake is the only chance West sees. So I don't think I can assume he has three clubs.

I unblock dummy's 8 (leaving me the option of playing West for JT or J9 doubleton), East plays the 4, and I win with the Q.

I have seven tricks. Is there any way to take an overtrick other than bringing home the club suit? There is no danger in playing spades. The defense can take at most three spade tricks. So I might as well try it and see what happens. But I need to unblock the A first before they tangle up my entries with another club play. I cash the A--2--4--9. It appears that either East is giving present count with 987 or he is following up the line with 1097.

I play the 3--8--10-J. East returns the 6. Why a spade rather than a diamond? I guess he is desperately hoping that I made a weird play with Qxx and that the suit is running. In any event, he must have begun with four spades. He would not block the suit by leading low from honor doubleton. I play the 4, and West wins with the K. If my assumptions are correct, West is 2-4-4-3 and East is 4-3-3-3.

East plays the 8. I take dummy's queen, and East follows with the 10. This is the presumed position, with me still to discard on the Q.

Christian
6
Qx
10x
Phillip
9
5
J
K2
Floyd
A7
x
xx
Jack
Q5
A
A75
D
6

I have two ways to make eight tricks. I can (A) pitch a spade and run clubs, or I can (B) pitch a club and drive the A. If my construction is correct, it doesn't matter what I do. So I must assume my construction is wrong. Specifically, I must assume West has one more diamond or one more spade than I think he does. It doesn't matter which.

That makes West either 4-2 or 3-3 in hearts and clubs. In the former case, clubs aren't breaking and I must pitch a club and drive the A. In the latter case, East has the good heart and I must pitch a spade and run clubs. Against these opponents, the choice is clear. There is no chance I am wrong about the heart split. A human opponent might try to mislead me about who has the long heart. But Jack would never play 7-9-10 and hold onto the six. West must have the 6, so I pitch a club and drive the A. Making two.

Christian
K8
K862
KQ32
J103
Phillip
1092
Q543
J74
K82
Floyd
AJ76
1097
985
964
Jack
Q543
AJ
A106
AQ75
D
6

West was 4-3 in hearts and clubs as expected, so either play would have worked. The result at the other table is identical.

Table 1: + 120
Table 2: -120

Result on Board 6: 0 IMPs
Total: +31 IMPs

0 Comments
Getting Comments... loading...
.

Bottom Home Top