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Spy Versus Spy
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In the final session of the Mitchell BAM, you make a typical BAM decision that looks to be problematic when the dummy hits. 

North
97
KQJ97
Q6
Q1098
South
J53
A1062
AK5
A73
W
N
E
S
2
P
2NT
P
3
P
3
P
3NT
P
P
P

LHO leads the T, showing the Jack from four+ or denying it from three or fewer. At least you skated on the spade lead, but if your opponents get a diamond lead in 4, they can ditch one spade loser and strip the hand before playing clubs, likely making five. Making eleven tricks here seems remote, but you have to go for at least ten or you will probably have no chance to win the board. What is your plan?

North
97
KQJ97
Q6
Q1098
South
J53
A1062
AK5
A73
W
N
E
S
2
P
2NT
P
3
P
3
P
3NT
P
P
P

Perhaps your best plan is to enlist your opponents help. They didn't lead a spade initially, so maybe you can coax them into eventually leading clubs for you by starting spades yourself. So, win the K in hand, cross to dummy in hearts, and lead the 9 off the dummy, hoping to duck it into LHO who may very well continue diamonds. Implementing this idea, RHO covers the 9 with the ten, you play the Jack, and LHO wins the Ace. After a short thought, LHO continues a diamond. Success! You win in dummy, come back to your hand with a heart, cash the A, and run the hearts. LHO pitches three small clubs top down, playing upside-down count and attitude, and RHO pitches two spades and a club.

This looks to be working quite well. It seems the four-card end position is 

West
86
J3
North
7
Q109
East
KQ
KJ
South
53
A7
D
Simply throw RHO in with a spade and you will make four, hopefully salvaging the board.

However, way back at trick three, when you implemented your deception, it turns out that LHO was doing a little trickery of his own ...

West
AQ6
43
J10843
654
North
97
KQJ97
Q6
Q1098
East
K10842
85
972
KJ2
South
J53
A1062
AK5
A73
D
You did fool him into thinking you needed to develop the spade suit. In return, he wanted to lull you into a false sense of security about the spade finesse, so that his diamonds might get set up before you took the "safe" finesse into him. In the four-card ending, RHO flies the K and exits a spade, seeing the inevitable endplay. She is as surprised as you when LHO faces his hand for down one.

This is the first hand I can remember ever playing where declarer and a defender both engaged in a fairly sophisticated deception on the same trick. The result could not have been foreseen by either. What a great game this is.

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