Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Andrew Sinclair
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All the ACBL announcements are listed on the Alert Chart: http://web2.acbl.org/documentlibrary/play/AlertChart.pdf

Explaining that a Forcing Stayman bid may not contain a 4-card major is not listed, so no, you don't need to announce it. If your partner is asked by an opponent later, your partner should fully disclose your agreement. Simply saying “Forcing Stayman” is not enough unless you are 100% sure your opponents will know what that completely entails.
March 13, 2017
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Steve's comment as related by Andy is taken out of context. The “Yes” is in regards to correcting explanations about your agreements, not about what your hand actually is. The opponents are entitled to know your agreements, not your hand. If your partner mis-explains your agreements and you are the declaring side, you must correct after the auction before the play.

There are a few wrinkles this leads to:
1. You forget your agreements and bid incorrectly. You partner also forgets your agreements, and when asked explains your bid as the same thing you intended, but not your agreement. You correct the explanation when you remember your actual agreements but then the dummy comes down, showing exactly what was explained. Seems a bit fishy.

2. If you make the same mistake often enough, partner might know that 2H could be either just hearts, or hearts and a minor. I'm not sure if there's a guideline for exactly how often this must happen for it to be an “unwritten agreement” but I think at some point, partner should say “2H shows hearts and a minor, but I've seen my partner make a mistake before and have just hearts.”
Feb. 22, 2017
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First, restart your computer. If that doesn't help, more information might be useful. What operating system are you using? What web browser?
Feb. 14, 2017
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As a novice, I would be inclined to play the same defense as over a natural 1 except double would show spades. 2NT minors, 2 Michaels. I would be more hesitant to raise my partner's 2 bid on only 3 card support given the known bad break. In “balancing” seat it depends on what your partner's pass or responses mean.
Feb. 9, 2017
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You don't know if it's game forcing until you ask.

Also, I'm torn between the approaches of never ask so your opponents can't clarify their bids and always ask so you don't give UI to your partner by sometimes asking and passing and sometimes just passing. Theoretically you are protected if you ask every time because if the answer helps your opponents it is UI.
Feb. 6, 2017
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What were the director's options? I would let East pass if it would bar West from leading spades for a round and I would bid 3NT. If East decides to bid 4 then I double.
Feb. 4, 2017
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Mike, it's because he's assuming that the opening lead was from QJ or QJT(xxx). Being able to place at least two hearts in North's hand means that North has 11 unknown cards, and before we know if South followed to the first trick, South has 13 unknown cards. This brings me to the chance the K is onside is 11/24 ~= 46%. I believe Charles took the fraction 11/25 (I think this is an accident), because that is 44% exactly.
Feb. 1, 2017
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You can. I find it very useful though cumbersome to use.

Click My BBO -> Hands and Results -> Hand Editor. Create the hand and save it in a new folder. Then start a teaching table, sit at all 4 positions, and click Deal Source and choose the folder. Then Redeal.
Feb. 1, 2017
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It might not be. I don't know the percentage of either line but I know this one is larger than 50% so that seemed acceptable.
Feb. 1, 2017
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Win in hand and take the diamond finesse. If it loses, you can win any return and squeeze South if they started with 4+ spades and 5+ diamonds. If South incorrectly shows 5+ cards in the rounded suits, you can switch to the major suit squeeze on North provided South did not return a heart at trick 3.
Feb. 1, 2017
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15 minutes into filling out a new card, this should have been discussed.
Jan. 16, 2017
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@Jay, AKQxx AKQx x xxx?
Dec. 3, 2016
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If West had one more low diamond and one fewer low club at trick 11, N/S have the last 3 tricks, plus the other 4.
Dec. 2, 2016
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How many tricks are N/S asking for? Give them that many. I'm guessing that is 8 tricks, since N/S should win 7 tricks on the play plus one penalty.
Dec. 2, 2016
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I agree. I think from recent events we can see that sometimes a single board between two pairs can indirectly affect who wins the entire event even if that pair is not directly involved. The ACBL should strive 1) to have fair rules and 2) to make sure that the rules are applied equally to every pair, every board. Whether one is a newbie pair or a past world champion should not matter. Whether one is leading the field by 5%, in the middle of the pack, or behind by 5% should not matter. Whether it will benefit you or harm you or have no effect on your score should not matter.
Nov. 20, 2016
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After 1NT, how does responder show a slam try with 6M-3-2-2 or 7M-2-2-2? Could one play that after a Jacoby transfer, a jump to the 4-level shows first- or second-round control (or just first-round control) while a 3 bid (or something else) is an artificial slam try with shortness?

For this partnership, N and S must agree whether responder can splinter with such a weak hand, or whether opener can ask for key cards with such a weak hand (in light of the splinter). They share blame because they did not agree on a solid definition of the possible strength of responder's splinter.
Nov. 1, 2016
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Though it might be suboptimal, I will open the longer minor no matter what and with equal length open 1 unless it's 3-3 and then open 1. This is local novice standard practice, so I would feel safest bidding this way with a pickup partner. My regular partners will not raise my minor suit (playing inverted or not) without 5 card support, except perhaps after a 1M overcall he or she might raise with 4-card support. The worst case is we wander into a xxx-xxxx fit (can we call this a telephone number fit?) but it's never happened yet.
Oct. 31, 2016
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Marty, what do you play following a reverse into spades? Since 2NT would both be 1 step up from the reverse. Or do you prefer not reversing into spades with a minimum reverse, instead bidding something like 1m-1H-1S.
Oct. 21, 2016
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I would take it as a control bid. I'm thinking partner has a hand with long diamonds (6+) that wasn't able to preempt due to suit quality. Say, x Kx xxxxxxx Axx. It should be a slam try because you've already told your partner that 3NT is the best game.
Oct. 17, 2016
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Ruff the last spade, then three rounds of diamonds. You can fall back on the club finesse if East wins the third diamond and returns a low club.
Oct. 16, 2016
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