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All comments by Andy Hung
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Is your 2NT rebid forcing? If it is, then fine that's OK to be rebidding 2NT. But if it isn't, what is responder meant to do over the 2NT rebid with 4(144) or a hand with 5 (e.g. 5(431) or 5(422)) that had stretched to respond 1?
June 27, 2019
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Completely agree with Stephen here. Unless you play a conventional 2NT rebid where it's forcing or something (and one of the hand types is 18-19 with 4-card support), then you should never be in favour of hiding four-card support.
June 27, 2019
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Barbara makes a great point that you might need to tread carefully when South has responded 1NT. Given the hearts are badly placed, there might be more harm in competing to 3, although down three is a bit unlucky! (I would think down two would be more normal if it was doubled).

But anyway, it seems like most people were discussing whether South should double 3 or not - what about North's opening hand along with a heart void? The hand is so powerful in that North should be the one doubling for takeout! Imagine South has about 8-10 points but the heart stopper was shaky something like Qxxx. Now all of a sudden, if N/S have a good fit in one of the minors, a 5minor contract is well within reach.

Say South has xx Jxxx QJx KQxx. If North passes 3 (or 2 if West bids 2), what is South meant to do? Pass of course, as North didn't double for takeout, but now N/S have missed a minor suit contract. Maybe South has xx Kxx Qxx KJxxx, and same story but now 5 seems like a great contract!

Yes you might say South probably has more HCP in hearts for the 1NT bid, but the thing is, that's not guaranteed. Sure if South is loaded in hearts, you can now consider defending 2X or 3X. If you're not defending a doubled heart contract, that's OK, you can still play in a minor suit partial - North's takeout double doesn't force your side to a game. You must compete.
June 27, 2019
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Just be a bit careful about designing or following these type of rules. It's much better to exercise your judgement rather than to apply some mathematical forumlas.

On this hand, I'd just be thinking as South that I probably have 2 trump tricks, A, and might be possible to get a diamond (or spade) ruff/overuff, and partner has opened the bidding, so I would be happy to make a penalty double.

As for North's bid over 3, see comment below.
June 27, 2019
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100% North. Playing a convention shouldn't mean you forget about judgement. Four trumps is too huge. Say partner has clubs. You have 3 red suit losers, so partner has Qxxxx and AQxxx and game has chances. Sure partner might have KQxxx and there are 4 top losers, but in that case, perhaps 4 is cold. I think it's just a very fine line, because quite often, South will be evaluating based on 3-card support and South may need more to raise to 4.
June 18, 2019
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That's a bit deep Kate, isn't it? I wouldn't always re-open with 3244 and Hx in hearts, and if partner has three hearts we may still have nine tricks in NT.
June 18, 2019
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I would definitely respond as North if my partner opened 1.
June 15, 2019
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If anything, it's the other way around? Matchpoints you hide the information to get a favourable lead but at IMPs it is absolutely important to get to the right contract.

But it doesn't make any sense. By opening 2NT:
- If you don't play puppet stayman then you lose out the 5-3 fit
- Partner has 4333 and decides not to Stayman (which is fair enough with 4333 and I'd usually wouldn't Stayman either) and once again we miss the 5-3 fit
- Partner has a bit club fit and we miss out on 5 or 6 contract
- There is no heart fit and we play in 3NT, but from the wrong side and the diamond lead goes through partner

By opening 1 followed by 3, we can handle any scenario and we can get partner to be the declarer if the contract is 3NT.
June 15, 2019
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I don't see much problem with opening 1, planning to make a jumpshift with 3?
As to the actual auction, North's 2 overcall makes it slightly complicated, but I think I would take the risk of reopening with a double (maybe partner has a penalty pass!), but if partner bids 2, I will remove it to 3. Partner probably won't be strong enough to jump in spades given the lack of negative double.
June 13, 2019
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Did the 3 bid in your Gazilli auction guarantee 5-5? What would you do with 54(31) and 19 points?
June 13, 2019
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I agree with 3NT. In these situations, especially in IMPs, it pays to just overbid a little to try for the game bonus. There may even be situations where 3 goes down but 3NT makes (imagine if partner has five diamonds)!

Sure we'd like to bid an inviting 2NT, but without that, I go for the high road. This “8HCP” hand is a really good one with two aces and a five-card suit. Contrast this to a 9HCP 4333 hand with no aces, I sure know which one I would want!
June 13, 2019
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Long ago I used to play it as splinter, but now definitely prefer natural. It just shuts out the fourth seat (i.e. if we bid 2 they can easily overcall 3m) and is just very effective.

A potential workaround solution now would be to play 1S-3NT as a heart splinter (so the replacement of 1S-4H splinter). Alternatively, you can also play 1H-3S and 1S-3NT as an undisclosed 10-12 splinter (next step asks with responses of Low, Middle, high), and 1S-4m and 1H-3NT(spade)/4m as 10-12 voids (but give up the 1S-4H void and put that in the 1S-3NT splinter).
June 1, 2019
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Definitely natural to play. Exclusion is good only if your opponents promise to stay silent! Which never happens. But in practice, I've definitely had plenty of good boards where the auction went 1m-(something)-4, or 1-(1)-5 and the amount of times the fourth seat has “misjudged” was plentiful. I say “misjudged” in the sense that sometimes fourth seat has 4 or 5-card support and is more or less ‘forced’ to compete to the 5-level and it turned out to be wrong.

Of course you can still exclusion in the opponents suit on the first round.
June 1, 2019
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Putting it another way - Partner has overcalled 1, and I have AQ108 plus the K and a bit of shape (i.e. likely won't be endplayed), if 3X makes, I will quit bridge!
May 31, 2019
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Partner did well to bid 2NT, but if you were going to bid 2NT, it's probably better to start with 2 (forcing) to check on a spade fit, if partner bids 2, you can now bid 2NT.
May 31, 2019
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I'm a simple soul. Bids are natural, X is both majors, 1NT is both minors.
Here, I would just overcall 2. Just because they've shown “16+” doesn't mean I shouldn't bid with my 64. I would've overcalled if they opened a natural 1 or 1 anyway.
May 31, 2019
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I think if East is going to raise 5 to 6, it's better (and free) to bid 5 first? Just imagine if partner bids 6 next!
May 31, 2019
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Barbara does make a point though. I'm not sure if I want to bid with a void in diamonds, but if I must bid, 3C is not unreasonable because often a 2NT bid delivers a doubleton in partner's minor, so if partner has a 6-card diamond suit (quite often she will), they are more likely going to raise to 3NT and we can't set up the diamonds. The 3C bid does warn partner about our (likely?) lack of diamond support, so she can still rebid 3D if it's right, or if partner is strong enough, can still bid 3H checking for a stopper.
May 31, 2019
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I dislike them with a passion, but you do it when it seems ‘right’. E.g. Vs. suit contract and you have almost a yarborough so partner is marked with strength etc.

I remember one hand a couple of years ago where I had a very weak hand (1 or 2 points) and opp's were in 4H. I didn't have much except 9x and felt that a club was the best lead to try and beat the contract. But at the same time I had strong negative feelings about doubleton leads that I just didn't want to do it. In the end I gave in and led a club. I remember this hand very distinctly - because the club layout turned out to be:

………QJxx
….xxx…….AK108
……….9x

Just my luck :)
May 31, 2019
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Hmm I'm not convinced about the lead, I need a simulation!
I do know that partner is marked with 4-5 hearts on the auction, but with dummy bothering to show hearts, they will have a bit of strength there (probably).
I would just lead my spade. It's still possible for us to have a 5-4 spade fit, or maybe partner has AQx, or A10x and dummy has Hx, or maybe the HQ is a possible entry, or maybe it might be the safest lead.
May 31, 2019
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