Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Brian Baresch
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And the preventative “Chicken Texas,” where 4 is hearts and 4 is natural, and the “whattheheck did we agree about this again?” 4 bid doesn't happen.
Aug. 23, 2018
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Certainly the “winning more than $200,000” part couldn't.
Aug. 14, 2018
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That's how chess tournament pairings work, as I recall.
Aug. 6, 2018
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I was placing fairly creditably yesterday in the fantasy bracket standings, but today my current score and max possible score are the same, and it looks like I have a lot of company. It's that kind of scene.
Aug. 4, 2018
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Once more unto the bridge club, my friends.
July 30, 2018
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All the heat and dust about whether what Horton did is illegal misses the point. He passed off other people's work as his own, which is clearly dishonest. It may not be de jure fraud, but certainly it is intellectual fraud. With the considerable extent of the examples, the idea that Horton, a professional writer for decades, made an innocent mistake strains credulity.

At the very least, this affair indicates that Horton isn't someone an ethical publication ought to do business with.
July 27, 2018
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That's the one.
July 23, 2018
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Something something 2011 Vanderbilt something.
July 22, 2018
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Who fakes a realistic video of a robot tournament? How would you even do that?
July 15, 2018
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I deal a random spade honor to West. <flips coin> It's the Ace. I deal the rest of the East-West cards, and the King follows the Ace a bit less than half the time. OK.

Now I try it with the King. Again, the Ace follows to West a bit less than half the time. But we've already seen those hands, during the first go-round, so we don't count them again.

So the honors end up together about a third of the time.
July 11, 2018
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Chip, my father said a professor of his once had to fill two blackboards when someone asked him to explain “Through simple algebra, we reach …”
July 8, 2018
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Raymond Smullyan had a story along these lines.

A professor said “It is obvious that” and a student asked “Why is it obvious?” The prof thought for a minute, then went outside and paced up and down the hall for 20 minutes, and finally came back and said “Yes, it is obvious” and continued the lecture.

Smullyan also gave (in “What Is the Name of This Book?”) the following explanation of the meaning of the word “obvious” when used by certain members of the Princeton math department.

When Professor A. says something is obvious, it means that if you go home and think about if for a couple of weeks, you will realize that it is true.

When Professor L. says something is obvious, it means that if you go home and think about it for the rest of your life, the day might come when you will see that it is true.

When Professor C. says something is obvious, it means that the class has already known it for the last two weeks.

When Professor F. says something is obvious, it means that it is probably false.
July 7, 2018
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“The solution, once found, is obvious.”
July 6, 2018
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I do both. Measure twice, and all that.
June 18, 2018
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Late to the party, but … the main thing I would try to teach is to think about what *we* have and not what *I* have. “What's our best fit” rather than “what's my best suit,” trying to hit partner rather than leading my long but worthless suit at notrump, etc.

Another principle is one that I like to express as “Always make the call or play that allows you to blame your partner” – meaning, trust partner to have their bids and believe their signals. The more you trust partner, over time the more trustworthy partner's actions will be.
June 16, 2018
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Edited because Ed's later comment makes this one irrelevant.
June 14, 2018
Brian Baresch edited this comment June 14, 2018
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Ditto
June 7, 2018
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A Soloway-style team event with a one-day Swiss qualifying four teams for semis and finals.

I live in NYC and haven't been playing much, but for that event I'd drag myself out and enter.
June 6, 2018
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Someone did that against me once in 7NT and I had to pay close attention to cover declarer's card or it would have won the “ruff” trick.
May 25, 2018
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I once saw an opp open 2 in a hand that didn't merit it, then later ask for aces with 4. Opener signed off, responder couldn't believe her hand opposite 2 couldn't be in slam, so she bid 4NT. It was the first time I ever saw a pair bid Gerber and Blackwood on the same hand.
May 17, 2018
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