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All comments by Collins Williams
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What is the advantage of 4 over 4? 4 lets partner know which cards in his hand to upgrade and which to discount.

!4C is clearly not perfect. I am worried about the lack of a 4th heart for it. As Michael pointed out, it is easy to foresee partner's having the opportunity to draw some wrong conclusions based on that lie.
April 30, 2013
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I am most drawn to any content that shows the thought processes of experts. So Kit's corner, Philip Martin's Gargoyle series, Under Further review all get my close attention.
Jan. 16, 2013
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I chose a heart as well. Decided against diamond Q Based on slight inference from Auction that diamond length is with east.
Dec. 11, 2012
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I would think that passing 2D is a Logical Alternative unless there is written evidence to the contrary. Given that passing @D is an LA, the hesitation certainly suggests not passing 2D.
Dec. 7, 2012
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If I understand the question: It is what about hands that might want to rebid 1N after opening 1C and that are not classically balanced…

With 2=4=2=5 we have no problems sitting for the double. with 2=2=4=5 we frequently open 1D (planning to rebid 2C)

Similarly for the 1=4=4=4 and 1=3=4=5 (will rebid 2C)

1=4=3=5 is the most problematic. After 1C 1S we might well rebid 1N but then we are most afraid of being played for 2S by partner.

Nov. 22, 2012
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I had a meta agreement with one partner that any double facing a limited balanced partner was for penalty. I still think that such an agreement makes sense.
Nov. 22, 2012
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Does “cards” have a meaning that is anything like generally understood?

“Penalty” tends to mean “I think we should defend this contract”

“Takeout” tends to mean “I am short in the strain named in the current contract, I have support for the other suits that are available given the context of the auction”

“Cards” tends to mean ???

Also Jim Olson wrote that responder has denied 4 hearts. Which of responder's actions did that? Might't he be 5=4=x=y?
Nov. 20, 2012
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I chose 3H but am worried that it shows 5. Pass certainly ought to be a valid option given that we won't be playing 3DX. Come home with a + and win the match on another board.
July 12, 2012
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The other alternative that occurs to me is a lead director against their eventual spade contract. (I'm assuming 3H shows a good spade raise)
May 4, 2012
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I did play this in one partnership. We called it NT amnesia and it worked reasonably well. The lack of memory strain was the main selling point. Once we had space brain cells we changed to XYZ
April 26, 2012
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I think we want to be playing in 5D or 4H. 4D gives partner the chance to show 3 card heart support without getting him too excited.
April 12, 2012
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The splinter does not let me find out if opener has a 3rd spade. It also (for me anyway tends to imply no suit with 2 quick losers).
Opener probably does have enough just to blast. But the way to find out for sure is to start w/ 3C
March 1, 2012
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@andy… I don't understand the matchpoint vs. IMP distinction being made but I would like to do so.

Presumably partner knows which game we are playing and took that into account? So, why at matchpoints might it make sense to ignore the lead director? Doesn't it put us ahead of that portion of the field that did not make it.
Feb. 18, 2012
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I would chose the diamond in case the heart entry in my hand were needed later
Feb. 17, 2012
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I don't see more than pitching hearts on clubs then HA, exit with a heart. I'll figure out if I need to ruff the heart high when the time comes.

Feb. 14, 2012
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All strange bids are forcing. If partner psyched 1N with a diamond suit then he will end up playing 4D (or 4C) instead of 3. If he has a 6 card diamond suit and a spade stop then we belong in 3N
Feb. 13, 2012
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MUCH more information comes through via the audio commentary than the chat commentary. I suspect it is nothing more complicated than that people can speak more quickly than they can type. But it is good to hear the thought process (warts and all) as the group of commentators analyzes a hand. Hearing the justification for various system and card play preferences is very enlightening to me.

One one hand in particular I was amazed at how quickly people decided that the 7 of spades w/East was a critical card (s held a stiff 8) I think the conclusion was eventually that the 7 did not matter but the idea that I should be able to arrive at a conclusion like about a spot card within a few seconds of seeing the hand is somewhere between inspiring and intimidating to me.

So in conclusion I give the audio a BIG thumbs up!
Sept. 19, 2011
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Hi John-

Thanks for this! There is a lot here to chew on…
This hand needs a 13th card (I'm guessing some midrange diamond)
A K 9 6 4
5
10 5 2
7 3 2


It is surprising to me that a stray HCP makes such a difference in expected result. I'm guessing it might be because
opposite a strong NT almost any quack is likely to be a filler? I wonder if that makes hand evaluation different (easier, harder)
opposite such a hand than opposite a 1M opener (even one that is limited by failure to reverse etc…)

Collins
July 20, 2011
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For me “general bridge knowledge” is at the heart of this problem. W/o having the concept of a body of knowledge that everyone is expected to know, the game would become unplayable but where this body of knowledge stops and specialized knowledge takes up is tricky.

The way I learned take-out doubles a hundred years ago was that advancer owed doubler another chance to bid. If responder did not pass, advancer was relieved of this responsibility and his pass could be either weak OR tactical and everyone (in my small universe) knew this. I have to say that even though I have never played multi (or against it) I was reminded of that situation as I read this discussion. It would not have occurred to me to think less of someone who passed with the West hand or to think that such a pass needed to be alerted. As for explaining the pass if asked, one should always be courteous and over-explain. My explanation might have taken the form of “I asked him to clarify his hand, the intervening bid has relieved him of that responsibility and he has taken advantage of that relief”. If I had relevant partnership experience I would certainly share it.
June 21, 2011
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