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All comments by Elianna Meyerson
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I would think that the question of how to play the hand would be something easily polled by a director of a comparable peer group, given the auction with a 4D bid and proper explanations, no?
July 20
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I replied to you on a different thread, but why do you think that a B permit is the only way to prove residency in Switzerland? There's also an L permit, which many have to get before a B permit. This permit also allows work and residency. (There's also a C permit - but one can only get that after living in Switzerland for five years.)

Also, Switzerland tends to be pretty random about giving an L or B permit to EU citizens from newer EU countries, and treats those pretty equally, it's just how often they have to submit renewal paperwork (and with an L permit it's tied to your employer, but that doesn't seem to be a problem).

Like George, I hope that they elevate the bridge in Switzerland (I hear that they will also be playing in local tournaments) and I really hope that as a result, we'll have more people learning to play bridge, and at higher levels.
July 1
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In Switzerland, it tends to be fairly easy for EU citizens to get B permits, but they still have restrictions on B permits for EU citizens from the newer EU countries, and those people might end up with L permits, which still authorize living and working in Switzerland, but must be renewed yearly (as do B permits that are issued to non-EU citizens, to EU citizens and their spouses it's every 5 years) and whenever your employer changes. B permits are not tied to the employer.
July 1
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Speaking as an American (former) math educator, I would include some argument from Common Core.

Two of the Common Core Math standards are related to deductive reasoning:

The main one would be the 8th:
“CCSS.MATH.PRACTICE.MP8 Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Mathematically proficient students notice if calculations are repeated, and look both for general methods and for shortcuts. Upper elementary students might notice when dividing 25 by 11 that they are repeating the same calculations over and over again, and conclude they have a repeating decimal. By paying attention to the calculation of slope as they repeatedly check whether points are on the line through (1, 2) with slope 3, middle school students might abstract the equation (y - 2)/(x - 1) = 3. Noticing the regularity in the way terms cancel when expanding (x - 1)(x + 1), (x - 1)(x2 + x + 1), and (x - 1)(x3 + x2 + x + 1) might lead them to the general formula for the sum of a geometric series. As they work to solve a problem, mathematically proficient students maintain oversight of the process, while attending to the details. They continually evaluate the reasonableness of their intermediate results.”

But I could see a case being made for the 7th:
“CCSS.MATH.PRACTICE.MP7 Look for and make use of structure.
Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression x2 + 9x + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 - 3(x - y)2 as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers x and y.”

I could also see making the argument that Bridge also helps (or lessons could be set up to help) with #s 2, 3, 4.

The Math Standards can be found here: http://www.corestandards.org/Math/Practice/

These supposedly can be tested, but I find a lot of the arguments for how accurate the tests are to be a little iffy. But a grade specific place to find some tests is: https://www.map.mathshell.org/stds.php

You'd have to coordinate with schools, though, to make sure you use ones NOT used in school, or even better, to use them in conjunction WITH the school, so that dual purpose can be made of them.

I know that this is exactly what you were looking for, but to be honest, if you could prove how it raises students' scores on something that schools get evaluated on, you'd have more success getting it in schools, if that's your goal.
April 18
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They replaced the logic section with a writing section in either 2002 or 2003 (I can't remember when I took it, but it was the last time to take the logic instead of writing). According to what I see on the website, they haven't changed it back.
April 18
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Before moving to Switzerland, I would have found this hard to believe, too. But if the French bid like the Swiss, they seem to not like to overcall right away, and when the opportunity to double later arises (since 3H is artificial, it would be be “safe” to double), they would take it.

So I agree, an American might wonder at the hand that can't bid 1H at the two level, but can double at the 3 level, but most (regular, I can think of one exception) Swiss would never think of overcalling on AQJx, for example, but that would be a lead-directing double for them. Perhaps the French are the same?

Anyway, I agree, it's hard to make a real ruling without the rest of the hands.
Dec. 3, 2018
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It does feel a bit gossipy, doesn't it?
Nov. 28, 2018
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In Switzerland, one announces the length of minor suit openings before the round. In Germany, is one supposed to say something right after partner bids, or is it like Switzerland? (Like if you play better minor, and partner opens 1C, are you expected to say “drei”, “drei oder mehr”, or “better minor”? And in Germany do they say “better minor” like in Switzerland, or "besser Unterfarbe?)

Then again, as I said, most of the times I play in Germany is behind screens and then it's really easy.
Oct. 26, 2018
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If you need to translate any American bridge terms to German let me know.

One thing that very surprised me: Someone opened 2C, alerted, and when I asked, it was explained to me as semi-forcing. I was used to things that are passable being called semi-forcing so thought it might mean something like a strong two, but what they meant is that it's artificial and almost a GAME force, but not quite (2D would be the game force opening). I asked more questions because I didn't understand, but it turns out to be a very common 2-level system here, so people were confused by my questions. I don't think that this is that common in Germany, though; I haven't seen it much at tournaments, though.

You should also know that pretty much every artificial bid is alertable, and that includes weak 2 openings and overcalls (but not 3 level preemptive bids). In Switzerland it seems that people don't announce opening NT range, but the one time we played in Germany without screens someone got annoyed with us when we didn't announce the range (but I don't know if that's a regulation, or the person. We forgot to ask, and usually play with screens there.)
Oct. 25, 2018
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Is what I read correct on the webpage - they have smoking and non-smoking rooms, and cards are exchanged between them? And if I read it correctly, they say that they prioritize non-smokers, but is it possible as a non-smoker to end up in the smoking room? (Asking as someone with Asthma.)

Adam and I are definitely planning on (at one point) taking a week or so in Berlin, and we would want to go to a Bridge club, but not if we were in a room where smoking was allowed!
July 9, 2018
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My post to Debbie's subthread probably belongs better here.

From my (admittedly short) experience here, where I've played behind screens WAY more than in the US, people fall into habits and don't change them. Definitely the more experienced people use whispers and hand signals, as do the less experienced players following their lead.

However, since we had an issue with understanding, we've gotten instructions to have all opponents (behind screens) write out explanations, which has been readily complied with, showing (to me) that the experienced players know what the regulations are, and are willing to comply. It of course helps that Fernando (the strongest player in Switzerland, I think) makes an announcement reminding people of this at the beginning of a tournament with screens.

My main problem is that I have to look at something that says 5+C and think “it's weird that shows 5+” and then remind myself it shows 5+. It takes me a second each time I see that abbreviation (but not the whole word). (Sorry for the sidetrack.)
June 4, 2018
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I realize this is mainly about an ACBL event and so everyone is expected to use English, but this all gets especially hard when there isn't a common language. Writing in “Bridge language” (numbers and symbols) is much easier than speaking and trying to figure out if the person understood you. My partner had an incident (behind screens) where someone said something to him, and he understood it to mean something else. It was very frustrating. After that, we had the pleasure of making everyone write everything down, which does not seem to be the habit at all behind screens here.
June 4, 2018
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According to today's Daily Bulletin, http://cdn.acbl.org/nabc/2018/01/bulletins/db1.pdf (see page 2), there seem to be near-by parking lots that are $16 or $12 a day.
March 9, 2018
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Are you saying that if someone on your right preempts 2H, you play 2NT as minors?
March 2, 2018
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On the last board, I was worried that I would have a hard choice (with the North hand). Our auction started P - P - 1 - 2. I passed (of course, but started thinking what I would do if partner made a re-opening double). I had decided on bidding 2, but of course, seeing partner's hand, wasn't put up to the test. Still not sure it was the right decision (of course it is with partner's terrible hand, but if he'd doubled, surely he's have a better one?)
Feb. 12, 2018
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Seems to be the same in Switzerland.
Jan. 25, 2018
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What do you do when you encounter a person or pair that you know for sure acted unethically against you, and yet were not disciplined in any way? Are we advocating for people to just refuse to play against certain opponents even if they haven't been convicted of anything based on our personal knowledge?

As someone that has had people act highly unethically against them, including in front of a director, I still wouldn't risk suspension to refuse to play against them, but I definitely would more carefully document things this time around.
Jan. 18, 2018
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I am in no way saying caddies are in capable of moving boards in a three-way, but I think that it's not unlikely that at one point players in a three-way called the caddy to exchange boards (not realizing that three ways don't exchange boards as usual in a swiss) and when the caddies did that, it messed up the game. So now it's passed down that the solution is that caddies don't deal with three ways, instead of the more commensensical solution of explaining to them how that movement works.
Jan. 16, 2018
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Concentrate on each hand.
Jan. 1, 2018
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Well done and congratulations to everyone involved!
Dec. 31, 2017
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