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All comments by Eric Schwartz
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Pass. Not enough shape nor high cards.
Oct. 21, 2018
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I feel your pain.
Dec. 24, 2016
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How about 1C-(1S)-Dbl? What does opener do with diamonds and extra values, but not enough to force to game? If a 2D rebid shows extras, what does opener do with diamonds and without extras? I believe Victor King, a top New England expert, said that since the double shows at least two places to play, opener's 2D call is NOT a reverse.
Dec. 20, 2016
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Will trade for July, August. October, or November of 1967.
Dec. 19, 2016
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I believe I have one too.
Dec. 19, 2016
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I have played a 1C opening on two cards, because I like to prevent partner a from making a bad opening lead. If I have xxx in diamonds. and Hx in C, for example, I would open that 1C. I went throught an incredible hassle with the ACBL when an opponent complained he did not get an adequate explanation (we announced that 1C could be short and left it at that). The ACBL advised us that we could do that if we announced everything fully upon the 1C opening.
Dec. 5, 2016
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Zach Grossack is currently the youngest player to win a national championship. He and his older brother Adam won the National Fast Pairs at, I think, this year's spring (or possibly summer) nationals.
Dec. 5, 2016
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In New England, most good players use one of two methods. A second suit bid by responder after transferring is GF. Opener may now cue bid, showing support for one of responder's suit, in case their is a slam.

1. The standard way of cue-bidding is that a cue bid shows support for responder's second suit.

2. The late Mel Marcus, whose innovations in bidding theory have been widely adopted (here) suggested opener's rebid in responder's first bid suit show support for the second suit, and other cue bids were in support of the first bid suit. Example: 1N-2H!; 2S-3D; 3H! shows diamond support – any other cue bid shows spade support. (I don't play this method, so I may have gotten it slightly wrong – I will welcome corrections).
Oct. 9, 2016
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In the 1970's a group of expert players did exactly that. It eventually got banned by the ACBL.
Oct. 4, 2016
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I may have told this one before.

At Steve Becker's bridge club in Forest Hills, NYC. there was a team game and I picked up 12 spades missing the Ace and the ace of Clubs. I bid poorly and the opponents found a seven-level sacrifice.

When discussing this hand with his father (the late great B.J.), Steve said “There was a very interesting hand at the club last night: 12 spades to the King, and…)” B.J.'s wife Esther interrupted. “Twelve spades to the King what?”

Many years later Steve admitted to me that one of the players had fixed the board, trying to give one hand all thirteen spades.
Oct. 4, 2016
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Alan, I first heard that from the great Larry Edwards forty years ago. Liked it then, and still do now. Larry's version was "indem arsum Causen dux'.
Sept. 30, 2016
Eric Schwartz edited this comment Sept. 30, 2016
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From a non-expert:

I couldn't agree with you more, and wish you continued success.
Sept. 26, 2016
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Yes, I play that any positive response shows at least three controls. The question is whether West should do so with such a bad suit. Not that I know what he SHOULD bid.
Sept. 20, 2016
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I play that 5S denies the Q, and all other calls show it. 5NT denies ANY other Kings. Now partner may make a specific Queen-ask at the six-level. This might be accepted with a doubleton if the responder has sufficient trumps to handle declarer's losers in that suit. If the Queen-ask is sufficiently low, responder may bid another suit below 6S, a help-suit grand slam try.
Sept. 9, 2016
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Although Jimmy Cayne has been a top sponsor for a while now, he was a superb bridge player long before he started hiring experts who were barely as good as he was.
Sept. 5, 2016
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This is much simpler than anyone makes it. After East's 5S, West bids 5NT, asking for extras. East has them. Lots of them. BTW, because both 6S and 6NT outscore 6C, I would expect at most average, and probably close to 40%.
Aug. 29, 2016
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I play that opening 2C with a major suit shows 8 1/2 tricks. This is exactly what North has. As Richard said, North's jump to 3S in a 2/1 auction sets trumps and shows at most a one-lower suit; 4C is a cue bid. But with a 2C opening by North, South will know that a slam must be reached, and will bid appropriately.

Of course, just because this style of bidding will get to the slam doesn't make it right.
Aug. 29, 2016
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Joe, I'm with you. You can outbid any opponent if you think it's right; meanwhile, you get to hear three other people's calls before you rebid.
Aug. 27, 2016
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Playing Negative Free Bids solves all problems with this hand.
Aug. 26, 2016
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And how do you like wrong-siding the contract when partner has hearts?
Aug. 26, 2016
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