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All comments by Fred Ferguson
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What does E bid now … 3S
April 11, 2018
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Here is an important point about the “Splinter” when East makes a splinter bid he defines his hand, and thus, West becomes captain of the auction (has captaincy), if however, East makes a game try bid then West will answer and East retains captaincy. I personally think it is better for East to define his hand and let West decide the auction.
April 11, 2018
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Yes, if East cannot splinter 4C, then 3S shows hearts support (idk if the partnership would take a double as a support double or for penalty, but 3S is clear) and gets the auction in the right direction … after 3S East bids diamonds, diamonds, diamonds.
April 11, 2018
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sorry changed to 2D
March 28, 2018
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Yes, you are correct East could make an “aggressive” NMF asking bid of 2C and Yes East (who is the captain of the auction) could find out about the spade fit at the 2-levl. Since East is the captain of the auction East can make the NMF bid with only 8 hcp as partner will have defined responses to NMF and should not go crazy but stick with the system. But if the auction goes

1D - 1S
1NT - 2C
2D (denying 3 spades)

East will be forced to pass 2S and cannot make a 2NT correction as 2NT will look invitational (with only 8 hcp) and partner with maximum values might bid 3NT.

It is your choice, but I like to have a partnership agreement that NMF promises invitational hcp values, until I know there is a fit.
March 28, 2018
Fred Ferguson edited this comment March 28, 2018
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I received the following comment via email … in your Analysis of Board 1 you write:

> It is possible that some might choose to lead the ♣5 (or a trump) and not away from either the ♠A or ♦A in which case the lead from North can hold the play to making 4.

It is true that you still can make 4H when one leads the ♣5 (as I did) but the declarer than has to duck the trick when S plays the 10 (or covers queen with K). Should this duck be obvious?

Peter

Thanks Peter
March 28, 2018
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I received the following question via email … On board 13 how can you get to 6c when partner opens 2S? Thanks TP

So in the auction presented here after 2S - 3D | 3S - 4C if East had support for clubs and no extra values (lets just say 6-8 ordinary hcp), then opening 2S and rebidding 3S would have defined East's hand and East would pass 4C, right! So therefore, when make a free bid of 5C East must be showing a better hand. I think East bid of 5C is showing maximum value for a 2S opener with working values and good support for club Xxx i.e., not just xxx in clubs.

West has a very powerful hand 20 support points for clubs and only 4 losers. So when East shows maximum value, working values means aces and kings NOT queens and jacks and Xxx support for clubs West can add his 20 support points and partners 12 support points and reach 6C (remember partner has shown 6 spades and 3+ clubs which defines an unbalanced hand with shortness somewhere.

Hope this helps.
March 27, 2018
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I'm embarrassed :) sometimes you just look at things wrong, right spades are SQ84.

Did you get to 4S?
March 27, 2018
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Very cool … congrats for staying out of game, this may be because you play LTC, but another reason for not pressing to game (that I did not include in my write up) is that the CK is sitting under the club bidder and is therefore doubtful. I am glad to hear my line of play works, in that this auction could very easily get a club lead.
March 14, 2018
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Most players will mark their convention cards as 22+ hcp or 8.5 QT … if your card is marked for something different that is ok … it is by partnership agreement.
Feb. 14, 2018
Fred Ferguson edited this comment Feb. 14, 2018
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If you don't like playing the HQ, then don't play the HQ. As I have said declarer cannot make this contract on his own and often VERY OFTEN you position your self e.g. in like a strip an end play to give the opponents an opportunity to help you.

What I am suggesting is declarer take what action he can in order to make the contract … give the opponents an opportunity to get it wrong.
Feb. 2, 2018
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First we have a difference of opinion on the values required for two bids …

The concept of bidding suits up-the-line is “old bridge” in modern bridge you want to find 8-card major suit fits as soon as possible and then if you can't find a major fit then you find an alternative place to play the contract. If North first bids 1D and then takes a second free bid at the 2-level or higher (i.e., is not taking a preference) using modern Standard bridge methods shows 10+ points. If for example the auction went 1C - 1D | 2C - 2H this would constitute a responder's reverse showing even greater values.

For example, according to Alan Truscott (The Bidding Dictionary) playing modern standard methods in the auction 1C - 1D | 1H - 2H shows 10+ points.

But let me not forget 1NT bid, North has an unbalanced hand and if the bidding goes 1C - 1D | 1S - 1NT the bidding of 1NT again according to Alan Truscott and standard bidding methods constitutes a balanced hand EVEN with partner bidding clubs.
Feb. 2, 2018
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Regarding the play of the hand, in this deal declarer (South) cannot make 3C on his own (he needs help), and thus, in the play here South exits a heart in the hopes the opponents may get it wrong and I was trying to show how the opponents just might get it wrong and let South make 3C.
Feb. 1, 2018
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Regarding responding 1D (vs 1H) to 1C … if responder has two bids in his hand responder might bid 1D on-the-way of bidding suits up the line … but in the auction here North with 9 hcp realistically has one bid and should bid 1H or an 8-card heart fit might be lost … bidding 1D says you don't have 4 hearts. This holds true even if hearts are H5432.
Feb. 1, 2018
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Hi Rick, sorry for taking some time to respond to your question. You raise several points, let me address them one at a time:

1st maybe the worst bridge myth or legend the bridge community has hung around the necks of bridge players is “2nd hand low”. Bridge teachers teach “second hand low” to beginners because bridge is taught on the concept of just in time learning, meaning we teach players what they need to know at the time they are being taught and “second hand low” is an easy concept to tell beginners. But once players have learned enough to know what a “standard lead” is they should have also learned about defensive signals.

Sooooo, if playing to a trick lead by an opponent, if not making an effort to win the trick 2nd hand should be “giving count” NOT PLAY LOW.
Feb. 1, 2018
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Hi Larry … When I wrote up my analysis it was apparent that the only way to make 4H was if the SQ was on side and my write up suggested the spade finesse before pulling trump.

I was interested in seeing the KibtzthePros analysis that they only reached 3H (because there was a preemptive 3C opening bid) and while they all saw the uppercut on the clubs that not one suggested the spade finesse.

Maybe this was because they were only ine 3H, Hmmmmmm.
Dec. 20, 2017
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When responder has a suit of his own but not the values to bid at the 2-level, responder first make a Negative Double and then on you next opportunity bids his long suit (as in this deal hearts). Partner then says WTF why didn't he bid those hearts the first time around … Oh, he must have a heart suit but not 10 hcp to bid at the two level the first time around, well duh!

I have a ton of bridge books, but one of my favorite go to books is Mike Lawrence book DOUBLE! New Meanings for an Old Bid.
Dec. 20, 2017
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Playing card combinations is an important element of the game. He finessed the wrong way.
Dec. 13, 2017
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If you have the agreement that you will only raise with 4-card support then the 3S can be viewed differently, but some players today have the agreement to raise with only 3-card support.

It is always better to play in 4-4 fits than in 5-3 fits or 6-2 fits because after you pull trump you have a long side suit in which you can pitch losers.
Dec. 13, 2017
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A takeout double by East is not the worse bid I seen, but I don't like doing this with 3-spades especially since East has a bid of 2D. The same can be said for South's bid of 1S, knowing the partnership has a 9-card fit in hearts. After West jumps to 3C, East owes West a raise in clubs.
Dec. 13, 2017
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