Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Kevin Rosenberg
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No, I'm saying in Dave's sample auction, where South bid 3H, and North bid 3S, that South should now bid 3NT, rather than 4S as Dave suggested
May 2, 2018
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r.e. Dave's sample auction

I think 3n directly by South is reasonable. 3h may be better, but South should absolutely offer 3n over 3s.
May 2, 2018
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your spades are a bit poor. How will partner know that something like Jx or even Jxx isn't exactly adequate support?
April 28, 2018
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if lho is 3424 as I said, you can simply take the first 12 tricks. So no, you don't need trumps 3-2
April 19, 2018
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Looks like rho has 6 diamonds. I play a then k of clubs. If they split, I draw the third trump, cash aj of hearts spade to ace, pitch 2 spades on the hearts, and now play a spade pitching a diamond. Rho is likely to win this against non world class defenders, and now I'm home basically.

With trumps 41, I can make if lho is 3424. Beyond that, it seems difficult to make on best defense.

I think this hand is really interesting because even though I like my first line if trumps break, there are issues. One is obviously a world class opponents who will know to execute a crocodile coup. Another is if spades are 3-3, RHO may hold the 10 and then my line will fail. An alternative line is to play as if trumps were 4-1 (my second line), but this fails to RHO being 2263 where I'm confident I will make with my first line. Another issue is RHO being 1462, but I don't see how to reasonably make at all against this shape. That is, unless the JC is doubleton, in which case I should have started with the AQ of clubs. But this presents issues if trumps are 4-1, so I don't think it's right.

Overall, I'm sticking with my original line if trumps split, in part because it's the coolest one, but it's possible there is better available that I'm missing
April 19, 2018
Kevin Rosenberg edited this comment April 19, 2018
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If West can double 3c and pass a double of 3s, then I think I can double the poster's claim that West is fairly good.

Just a joke btw. But in seriousness, West hand knows a 10 card minor fit exists and that ops have an 8, likely 9 card fit.
April 19, 2018
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first, this all feels like a bit of a hedge. Either in sentiment you want to allow mechanical errors, or you don't. I think pretty much everyone on Earth could agree that the examples Kieran mentions should be allowed to be taken back, and I'm not sure I'd even call the former a mechanical error.

I think it's fine if you don't in general want to allow mechanical errors. In some sense I agree, and I think my chess example is somewhat similar to a card falling face up on the table out of your hand. I do think bridge is different than chess though, and I think some people really do have difficulty grabbing the correct bid, and perhaps they don't always check what they bid after it's on the table. Personally I think that in principle, I would want to allow mechanical errors to be taken back.

Lastly, one thing that always bugged me was the saying that “bridge is a game of concentration”, so therefore all errors are equal because they involve lapses in concentration. Well, I disagree:

It seems to me there should be a higher emphasis on punishing bridge-related errors, and of course, lapses in focus on bridge-related problems fall into this category. However, lapses in vision, or focus on grabbing the correct bid, are not bridge- related errors in the same sense. They will probably be punished in some situations, and I have no problem with that, but it still seems wrong to lump all these errors together under “failure to concentrate”, when in fact they seem very different to me.

Here's my analogy: An employee in an office makes a serious work related error due to a lapse in concentration and is sensibly fired. He is told that the workplace is an area where concentration is needed to do well. Another employee is one day tasked with getting coffee for the office, but messes up the order due to a lapse in concentration.

Surely in writing our rules, we should treat lapses of concentration in regard to strictly bridge-related problems as more important, just as in a workplace, lapses of concentration in regard to strictly work-related matters would be most important.
April 18, 2018
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I could wait for David to respond, but my point was in reference to his comment about games.

I was a competitive chess player for many years, and if for instance, you accidentally hit one of your pieces, or knocked it over, the “touch-move” rule didn't apply. I don't see how this is any different in theory from a mechanical error in bridge. So my point is there are similar allowances in other games, not just life.

And fwiw I think David's tennis analogy, while quite funny, is really not a good analogy which in any way reflects the rules we play bridge under.
April 18, 2018
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So to clarify, do you think that in principle, a mechanical error should ever be allowed to be taken back?
April 18, 2018
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I'm a bit unclear what the complaint is. I agree 2s is an insane bid, but so what? Are you saying that overcaller was somehow signalled by advanced they didn't have a good cuebid?

Certainly, you can't ask for any kind of adjustment here, and to me this doesn't seem like anything but bad bidding.
April 14, 2018
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let's say you sit down to play with a newer player, and bid Texas without discussion, and they alert it. Presumably you wouldn't correct the explanation to “we had no agreement”.

I see this situation as similar. Even if they are a regular partnership, I doubt this specific auction was ever discussed by them.

So my point is you either correct all of these types of explanations, or none of them.
April 9, 2018
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it's an awkward area of bridge when explanations are wrong not so much due to agreements, as simply the explainer not being a very strong player. I doubt this pair had an agreement about this auction - the declarer simply misinterpreted a fairly standard auction and explained it as such.

My point is that, in other standard auctions, even if not particularly discussed, we seem to have no problem with the declarer explaining their partner's bid like they have an agreement, just because the auction is “standard”. If partner explains a standard auction (where you technically have no agreement) and you as dummy DO hold the hand partner explained (the standard hand), then we don't feel it's necessary to correct the explanation, saying “we have no agreement”.

Basically, it is inconsistent to only correct declarer's explanation when it is wrong, because technically in all of these sorts of cases, you have no agreement (and further, I think having to correct all such explanations, correct and incorrect, is clearly not something we'd want to start doing). Only correcting the explanations where declarer simply doesn't know standard bidding seems in the same vein to me as correcting explanations only when they don't fit your hand.

So I don't think the dummy should HAVE to correct the explanation in this case, though I would if I were dummy.
April 9, 2018
Kevin Rosenberg edited this comment April 9, 2018
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is south's 3H bid for real?
April 9, 2018
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if we play spade ace and a club, W will probably ruff but is now kinda endplayed.

If they play a diamond, I can win pitching a heart, and lead a spade to make. 6-1 diamonds could be an issue

If they play a heart, I should probably just play to ruff heart in the dummy? Unclear. 6-2 hearts would be an issue.

Overall, barring a 6 card red suit, this line leaves us excellently placed, so I'd take it.
April 9, 2018
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west could also have AKJ9. As Kit says it's trivial to play low from AK9, especially when they literally had nothing to play when they won besides a club which they knew was going to lose to my ace.

It is true against a random club player, they surely won't have AJ9, so I suppose I might play the Q then (have to decide between AK9 and AKJ9). I think it's more fair to say that this situation just wouldn't occur against a random club player.
April 9, 2018
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I think that's a fair line in the holding case, because RHO is very likely to have the doubleton trump (something I was asleep to when I wrote the original comment).

Still, I don't like the first case. It seems like if LHO had the ace of clubs we are just falling back on 3-3 diamonds basically, since they probably will play a trump.

Also, given that as Aloke says, trumps are fairly likely to be 4-1, my line might not be best either, since some those of the more complex positions really required 3-2 trumps in order to ruff 2 diamonds. There may be a better line - I'm too tired to think about it now.
April 8, 2018
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I think the idea should be to go after diamonds early.

I see two lines. The first is to take an immediate spade finesse, and if it wins, try to ruff a spade.

If it loses, they will probably return a trump. I can win this in hand an now play on diamonds with very good chances (making on 3-3 diamonds or possibly Hx with lefty or probably 4-2 diamonds with AC onside, though the play is complicated)

The other line is to just attack diamonds right away. I think these lines almost transpose, since I can lead the QS at my next chance probably (and still have the ability to ruff a spade if the finesse works)
April 8, 2018
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EDIT: missed the end, sry
April 8, 2018
Kevin Rosenberg edited this comment April 8, 2018
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a diamond promotion is potential worry as well, but only happens if W started with 5 to the K, which isn't really possible since they'd also need a spade entry to be a threat. Then E doesn't have an opening bid.
April 4, 2018
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I think the point about E being endplayed if they have all 3 spade honors isn't right. The defense won the first spade with the 9, so E can safely come out an honor.

That being said, you always have the option of playing for the spade-diamond squeeze on the line you took.

I also think this is a very well written article Arthur!
April 4, 2018
Kevin Rosenberg edited this comment April 4, 2018
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