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All comments by Lauritz Streck
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I'm sorry if that comes across wrongly but I certainly don't want to accuse EW of cheating! I explained bids as “probably…” myself and was completely wrong just because I didn't know better and wanted to give some kind of help to the opponents. And West might well just have mixed up his blackwood response and would have bid on with any speed of the sign-off and a UI situation is still something totally different to actual cheating in any case (Edit: or a mix-up just occurred, see below). Could you perhaps elaborate on which parts came across as an accusation of cheating?
And I would be certainly glad if East or West would comment as well, I'll try to contact them in case they want to comment themselves.
March 26, 2018
Lauritz Streck edited this comment March 27, 2018
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Thanks, added.
March 26, 2018
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No, North asked about 6 and the explanation by East was “probably club void”. The people polled had this information but decided to cash the ace of club anyway. Thanks for asking these clarifying questions!
March 26, 2018
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You'll find the explanations as well as the time of the hesitation if you hover with the mouse above all the yellow bids in the diagram. But anyway:
The hesitation occurred before East bid 5 which suggests bidding on. The matter gets complicated further by West possessing the queen of spades which he possibly denied previously.
March 26, 2018
Lauritz Streck edited this comment March 26, 2018
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Nice article again, Max!
On a club lead you can win, cash hearts and then clubs, pitching a spade on the fourth one. On the last club West has to either unguard spades or pitch a diamond honor, in this case you can pitch another spade and duck a diamond. You still have to guess whether the layout is as it is or whether spades run and West has another heart winner left though, so I this is not a line I'd call easy either.
Jan. 12, 2018
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Sounds like a great idea, I'd be thrilled to read it!
There is a vast amount of people with English as the native language in this community, perhaps one of them could read your article, alter some formulations or check for spelling mistakes before you post it. Would this help? I hope we'll find someone with enough time to do this in a spare minute if that's an option.
Jan. 11, 2018
Lauritz Streck edited this comment Jan. 11, 2018
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I meant the other guys in 6NT with the “likely diamond continuation”, hope this wasn't ambiguous. Of course the A is quite unlikely to run away in 6.
Jan. 11, 2018
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Hope you're doing well too! I saw that in the vugraph archive as well, it was a little surprising.
I wrote the article, saved it as a draft and asked the official Bridge Winners account(or you could send a mail to bw (at) bridgewinners (dot) com), they'll decide then.
The nicest perk for me was the article getting edited by Eugene who replaced quite a few, well, creative formulations. Thank you Eugene!
Jan. 10, 2018
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At the table I didn't think in this direction, thought it would only complicate matters because I believed the chance of a junior in this vulnerability actually having eight hearts to be negligible ;)
But yes, it shouldn't be difficult to read the position if West has six or seven, so this line is probably better.
Jan. 10, 2018
Lauritz Streck edited this comment Jan. 11, 2018
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Hello Kit,
I saw a discussion of the treatment in one of the old articles of your excellent column (unfortunately I can't remember which) where it appeared like you pulled only if you couldn't stand playing the contract redoubled.
What made you change the treatment? Is it so much more valuable for both partners to know of the soft spot (as far as I can see the only upside) that you break your usual relay system (If you almost always redouble partner can just make his system bid in the case he has no stopper) and that you let them off the hook if someone has a trump stack opposite xx? If you don't mind could you give some examples of hands that made you change the treatment? It would be really helpful to follow your reasoning!
May 5, 2017
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Independently of how you play the diamonds you should cash the spades before you Run the diamonds, I think. If West has say xxx Kxxx xx Qxxx he remains completely untoasted otherwise by just discarding his spades. There is no way to draw trumps afterwards, he'll just win and play a heart.

How to play the diamonds is quite an interesting question though. The problem is that East can beat you legitimately by covering from Jxxx as you don't have the entries to untangle the diamonds afterwards. Whether he'll find that is a different matter. He knows a lot about the hand, the trump position, your likely shape and he probably has quite a good idea of the honors you have. Still it will be really hard for him to picture such an unintuitive play and to work everything out at the table I guess, even though there doesn't seem to be a position where covering costs the contact. So taking the finesse can't win against perfect defense but it might well be the percentage play. It probably wouldn't have occured to me at the table to cover in a suit declarer has AKQxx or AKxxx in, even though it appears to be the right play.
May 3, 2017
Lauritz Streck edited this comment May 3, 2017
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I would certainly play a club to the king. If clubs are 3-2 you're cold now as long as diamonds aren't 5-1 by establishing the fifth diamond. Even if East has been cute from QJx (so the queen doesn't come down) you can just pitch your losing heart on the Q and subsequently ruff your diamonds good.

But even if West has Qxxx you're still making as long as the Diamonds are 3-3 provided you cash the spades first: AK discarding a heart, AKQ, Diamonds. West can ruff high, low, or not at all but he can't stop you from cashing the diamonds, overruffing if neccessay and ruffing the heart in dummy with the two trumps as entries to hand. (If you haven't cashed the spades he could beat you by discarding spades though).

So all in all it's a great slam considering you're cold with Clubs 3-2 and diamonds not 5-1 and still have good chances in this variation.
May 3, 2017
Lauritz Streck edited this comment May 3, 2017
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Great Article as always, this series really helps to improve a lot. Thank you!
Two minor points though: In the second diagram on page 11 the A is already played.
And West discarding on the third diamond isn't an issue in this particular hand as you can ruff low in dummy and afford to ruff the last spade high.
April 29, 2017
Lauritz Streck edited this comment April 29, 2017
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The hand is just too weak to expect anything to make. And bidding could be VERY costly.
April 28, 2017
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Ah, never mind, I assumed South to be declarer and didn't Check further. That makes Spades 6-3 even more unlikely.
April 20, 2017
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Unfortunately that might fail if someone can discard hearts on the diamonds. If West has say AKQJxxx xxx - xxx he can discard his hearts and wait for his heart ruff.
It does guard against six spades by West with exactly two clubs (as East then has too many red cards to discard his hearts), but that appears to be the only case where this line works and the lines above fail. (And would West really lead J from AKQJxx xxx xx xx?)
April 19, 2017
Lauritz Streck edited this comment April 20, 2017
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Oh, the memories. That must have been the hand in Burghausen 2014, right? The 3 preempt against my garbage of a 1 opening.
What can I say, I was young and stupid, having 6-9, 7card diamond suit hammered in my brain. If I remember correctly the TD was as astonished by my call as I am in retrospective. :)
Actually it was me who opened 4, so apparently I switched sides now ;)
April 11, 2017
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Sorry for the autocorrect mistakes, looks pretty terrible on a second look
April 11, 2017
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At the table the bidding went 1C 1S 2S 4S by the opponents, this hand never bidding. When Partner lead a heart from AT9 Tx Qxx xxxxx and declarer had KJxxx Kxxxx xxx - this allowed the contact to make because it allowed declarer to pitch two Diamonds on AK.
April 5, 2017
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At the table I lead A. Not such a success when Dummy Hit with xx Qxx Axxx A95x and Partner had xx xxx Q86x KQxx. Two down on a club lead, making on a spade lead when declarer guessed the Diamonds right
April 5, 2017
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