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All comments by Pat Norman
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Eric - I think you misunderstood, I think opener with the hand you gave should bid 2S, ensuring a game force. See my comment above on the fact that responder bids 2S only on 6+ good spades and out, and that 2NT is Lebensohl and that 3C & 3D is forcing. Keeps the bidding low.
June 20, 2016
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I think partner is most likely to be at least 4-6 in the minors since they did not reopen with a double. I would jump to 3NT after the reverse with those HCP and the queen third of hearts and qx of diamonds
June 20, 2016
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Eric - So 2D cannot be passed ever? Why not bid 2S instead to let partner in on the fact you are likely to have game in your own hand?
June 20, 2016
Pat Norman edited this comment June 20, 2016
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Michal - So what is 2NT by you on this sequence?
June 20, 2016
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After a reverse one would expect to have a play with a good suit … good enough you were going to pass one spade dbld and hope to get it more than one trick (I believe that equals 2 spades doesn't it?
June 19, 2016
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2S = Natural NF (KQ10xxx, QJ10xxx)what else would you want to be able to do with a penalty pass and weak hand?
2N = Lebensohl
3 minor = values
P = real junk - pard would have to make a jump reverse with game in his own hand and too much distribution to dbl

My question is - if partner is 4-6 in the minors with a good hand should he make a courtesy dbl or not. Buddy plays a weak NT system where I believe dbl is a more balanced hand.
June 19, 2016
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Steve, taking the 25 million households mentioned above and the rate of signup you had, comes to over 300,000 potential total for the ACBL. Based on experience as a child and my mother's AAUW bridge group, I would expect only a 2-5% rate as regular duplicate players. But I love the game of bridge as well as the competition. If we interest enough in improving their bridge skills in a social game, we will eventually build on the competitive side. After all, it is the American Contract Bridge League, not the American Duplicate Contract Bridge League.
April 2, 2016
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I read somewhere that LBIAD has around a 10% rate of signups and thought that was pretty good rate.
April 1, 2016
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Steve, How abut a “Deep-Throat” approach in which a “journalist” knows the name(s)of the letter writer and tries to vet the information. Then publishes the original letter and research results. I.e., is Bridge Winners = the WaPo? It seems that if there are egregious things happening someone needs to research and validate the info.
March 26, 2016
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Stu - this should work but follow the schedule so you don't end up standing in the cold. Do wear warm clothes just in case.

Considering the cost of downtown parking, are folks staying at the site really renting cars? You will find there are numerous restaurants and other amenities (basketball, and hockey pro games included … good luck getting a ticket for this Sunday's football game) not far from the playing site. So no car should be needed unless you want to ski.


The sand trucks will be out in force on the holiday so the roads should be pretty good. And one inch will melt with traffic flow heat from cars.

Also, I believe that it is not due to snow until later in the day anyway.
Nov. 25, 2015
Pat Norman edited this comment Nov. 25, 2015
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Glass is half empty or half full? If you live anywhere East of Denver and North of the Mason Dixon line, it looks like the weather in Denver will be comparatively balmy.
Nov. 19, 2015
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Don - Your argument depends on whether folks save $50 on the hotel but pay $20-30 more for fees. And also if you increase attendance overall by making it more affordable, you end up making up a good portion of the difference.

And many folks just give up because the host hotel becomes the only choice and is fully booked well before the tournament.

In the old days, some college dorms were available during the summer for students and you could get a clean but minimal hotel room for $6 a night (probably the equivalent of $50-60 these days).
Nov. 16, 2015
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Now having first significant snow of the year here in Colorado not had one yet … the day after the last snow a couple of weeks ago was sunny and 62 degrees. Take it you live in Tucson?
Nov. 16, 2015
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Steve - Define cold venue? Ever been to Colorado in October? It is glorious.
Nov. 16, 2015
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I have wondered here why no mention of how the WBF ranks players. There are both open rankings and women's rankings. As I enjoy both the women's and open events and have a female partner as my primary partner in the more competitive events, I like the WBF ranking process.

For those of you making comments about the lesser quality of the women's field, I will let you know that that level has actually strengthened over the years.


I enjoy the fact that you get World Master Points, but also get placement points if you finish in the top five in an event. The Master Points amortize away, while the placements points stay. You can be number one in the world for a while in total points but your rank in terms of placement points may be lower than a Lynn Deas or Betty Ann Kennedy.

I also think that bridge was intended as a social game, and like that aspect of the game.

I would welcome anyone identifying as a female into the ranks of a Women's event. And you might find that the top rated player might not be quite as superior to the rest of the field, as many of the men and women herein think.





Nov. 5, 2015
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What does your partner bid over 1D with Qx xx Qxxx AKxxx? i.e. can they have 4 diamonds balanced & invitational? or xx Kxx Qxxx AKJx?
Nov. 3, 2015
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Peg, thanks for that. I do not know if it is the same study or continued work. The one I saw had great video of the brains actually firing.

You and I are aware how exceptionally bright many women bridge player's are. It is my opinion that a good research study could be made of bridge players and the reason for differences, whether nature/nurture/segregation.

For my part, I have an idea that we may lose our train of thought because our brains are not as linear. In anthropology there is a theory that males may have had more single tasks like hunt the deer and protect my mate while females had more multitasking roles. It can be seen in conversation where men are lost after item #2 and women seem to follow the list and can reference back to exactly who/what is interjected later into the information.
Nov. 1, 2015
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Dave, never mind, I found the following:

Based on key findings, women make up a larger percentage of residents in:
• Family medicine (about 58 percent)
• Psychiatry (about 57 percent)
• Pediatrics (about 75 percent)
• Obstetrics/gynecology (about 85 percent)

The data show male residents prefer to specialize in:
• Surgery (about 59 percent)
• Emergency medicine (about 62 percent)
• Anesthesiology (about 63 percent)
• Radiology (about 73 percent)
• Internal medicine (about 54 percent)

See any significance?
Oct. 31, 2015
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Dave, Can you determine the percentage by type of field for doctors … for example, pathologist, dermatologist, surgeon, GP, family medicine, gynecology, etc. My guess that there are significant differences therein based only on my own personal observation and discussion with female M.D.'s.
Oct. 31, 2015
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Peg,

It is likely the male brain is built differently enough to make more of them excellent bridge players. I recently read an article that showed that when solving a problem,the male brain mostly fires on one hemisphere of the brain while the female brain fires back and forth. I, for one, believe that men have better constant focus on a single problem than women.

However … even taking this into account, there are several ideas I would like to note:

1) It was discovered that the traditional way of teaching math was male-oriented and that women taught in a different way could also excel at this.

2) Even if we argue that men's brains are better suited to excel in bridge it does not account for the fact that there are almost no women of comparable ability.

3) Mentorship and interaction with top level players makes a big difference in the quality of player. When you consider top level female players, how many of them were lucky enough to have male mentors? Very few women have chosen to go off on the tournament trail all by themselves, but you find many men who have done so.

4) Yes, there is definitely a perceived difference, especially in the older generation, that men are superior at a number of jobs, bridge pro being one of them.

Oct. 31, 2015
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