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All comments by Philippe Bodard
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conventional : it is minimum with or without spade control and at least 2 keys.
3NT would be spade control, not minimum as 4C and 4D
April 17, 2018
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Hi Ken,
Sorry for the delay
I have to read again all my archives to give you a precise response, but I have no time this week. Thanks for the article of december 1919, I did not know it.
If my memory is good, the Paris well-known club is “L'auto mobile club de Paris ” and the contract bridge of 1911 seems basically the same as the contract of your article. The exact word was “bridge avec contrat”. In 1914, Bellanger write a book with the laws of this type of bridge, which was the first version of the “Plafond” (But the name “Plafond” dont exist before 1918 ).The book is very scarse, it lacks to my collection but a friend has a copy (the copy of the author), I will read it again.
Many options of bridge were tried in France between 1888 and 1920 in the clubs, as by instance the notion of “vulnerable” : I give you a scoop of one of my recent discoveries . Vanderbilt said he did not know the origin of this idea, I know this option was tried in France, then rejected, and also played in 1919 in Berlin, Germany, surely imported from France after the war, because before 1914 it was certain that this idea did not exist in Berlin.
And a last word about the Contract bridge of the Hamilton Club in 1917 : I think the most probable is that it was an imported idea from France, maybe by Montréal.
April 10, 2018
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“Contract Bridge played at the Hamilton Club, Hamilton, Canada in 1917.”
I dont know what was this canadian kind of Contract-Bridge.
But Contract-Bridge was before the “modern” Contract Bridge of Vanderbilt, a generic word : Plafond was a contract-bridge, and before, since 1911, there was in Paris another type of Contract-Bridge.
Many players could have the same idea at the same time all over the world….or the Canadian Contract bridge of 1917 could be directly imported from France.
April 6, 2018
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You are sure it is not Edward Valentine SHEPARD, not Shepherd ?
April 5, 2018
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Sources : in other words, nothing serious, of the wind : by instance, I know 3 clubs (more than 600 members) and obviously never the players were asked ! So, yes, maybe a vast majority of the twenty-eight “Présidents de Comité”
N.B.: the same who voted for giving the scandalous quitus (financial) in November at the FFB, but it is another story

Come in a club of province and thus ask the players !
The reality is that (The Olympic question and the issue related, “sport or not sport”) is decided (as many other things outside the game of bridge)by a few, who have some interets for that (money first)
I understand the interest to modify the by-laws in the FFB (I am against this modification) but, please, dont believe it is supported by a vast majority, or you are able to believe in anything
Jan. 16, 2018
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Your last paragraph : “A vast majority of french bridge players (as it is the case in many other european countries) support this view”

What are your sources ? (many french players will dispute such an assertion : there are about 100,000 players in the French Bridge Federation, I doubt you know their ideas about this question “sport or not sport”)
Jan. 16, 2018
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I identified the four members of the french women team (they won the Championship)

- Marie Claire de Montaigu
- “Moussia” Marie Behr
- Annie Pouldjian
The last, Christiane Martin, was usually easy to recognize : she was young, blond and with a very fine face. There is no woman with these characteristics on the picture, but just behind Annie Pouldjian, there is a concealed face of a woman with a hat, who appears young and fine : I guess she was Christiane Martin.
I send the photo to Shireen for publication.
Sept. 27, 2017
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Yes, I have the same informations, the mother of E. G. Kempson was born american with Amy as forename, but in a personal family tree, it is Emmy !
Sept. 21, 2017
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I know a personal family tree about Ewart (Gladstone)Kempson (I suppose that the author is a member of his family, if necessary I can verify this fact).
The given dates are:
Birth = in September 3rd, 1898, Kingston (source = “ Civilian registration, Jamaica ”)
Death = in May 4th, 1966, Durham (source = probate act)This is the same date of death of our Ewart Kempson

Until proved otherwise, it seems that there are the good dates.
Sept. 19, 2017
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You are right, Archibald Manuel Dunn was born in October 1863 in Newscatle upon Tyne. I made some researchs in 2012 about the Dunn Family. I know one person of his family, living in New-Zealand.
Aug. 29, 2017
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Richard, you are right : never the scoring of bridge was inherited from whist. There are five differences between whist and bridge, and one is specifically the scoring (in bridge, the score by suits is exactly the same that in Boston, divided by 2 : 2/4/6/8 instead of 4/8/12/16)
Aug. 8, 2017
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I dont think that the reason for the low value of spades was to have a cheap option : this fact would be rather a happy consequence, by chance.
The range of suits at the time of the beginning of bridge () became from the game of Boston (a french game, a complex variant of whist), played since a century before bridge and until 1900.
Even one variant, the “Boston russe”, played in the middle of the 19th century, used the spade suit as the low suit (but the range of suits was )
Aug. 8, 2017
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About Mrs Horton.
Yes, Ken, your are right, she wrote about bridge before E. Tennant, but it is not exactly a bridge book.
Aug. 7, 2017
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About this article of 10 June 1909 and “Miss Eleanor A. Tennant, the only lady who has ever written book the game”
This statement is incorrect.
In Sept. 1903, Lady Anne Coventry, the wife of Prince Victor Duleep Singh, the eldest son of the Maharajah of Lahore and of the Sikh Empire wrote a bridge book in french (never translated) “Manuel de Bridge”, in one big publishing house, Flammarion . The book was successfull (11.000 copies over 10 years to fev 1914, last edition) and was edited with as name of author “Princesse V. D. S.” for Victor Duleep Singh.
Lady Anne Coventry was renowned with her husband as very good players
Aug. 7, 2017
Philippe Bodard edited this comment Aug. 7, 2017
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Ken,
Thank you very much for your assessment (the world authority), but for me, I consider Thierry Depaulis, the Chairman of the International Card Playing Society of London (I know him of course very well)as the number one.
Aug. 7, 2017
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Yes, pagat.com is a very good link for the rules of biritch
Aug. 7, 2017
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NO, not really.
The term “Bridge Whist” was used by English/American players at the beginning of the 20th century, but the players use also the simple word “Bridge”. Many books have as title “Bridge Whist” (by instance, “Bridge Whist” by Melrose in 1901). Bridge Whist was used because it is a variety of Whist,and the add of “Whist” on the cover or in an article is only a gnosis, to explain at the profans what is “Bridge” (it is the same problem with “Biritch or Russian Whist” : biritch is not THE russian whist (there are many russian whists, more popular at the time!), but if you dont precise “Russian whist”, biritch evokes nothing to anybody.
In UK and USA, the “Auction Bridge” was played only about 1908 (in France in 1909)and became more popular after 1911.
And yes, I know, you can find in some books (bad books !)the explanation that “bridge whist” is a term invented later to make the difference with “Auction” or “contract” bridge, but this is no sense
Aug. 6, 2017
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I can add I know another evidence from another Greek (Scaramanga)but there is no precise date
Aug. 6, 2017
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Hi Richard,

In a document of 1901, an English diplomat spoke about his good and old friend (who was Emmanuel Mavrogordato, a prominent character of the bridge between 1880 and 1900) and quoted a letter of his friend about the games played in Manchester in the Greek Colony from 1876(Cayenne, then Khedive, then in 1880 bridge)
If I am not too lazzy, I certainly will write a day or another an article about Mavrogordato, a very interesting character (I studied his live in Istambul, where he was between 1886 and circa 1902)
As an expert of bridge, Mavrogordato is a very good witness for the bridge history.
Aug. 6, 2017
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“we were taught he even Anglicized the pronunciation of his name”
Very special argument ! Are you sure it's not the contrary ?
Generally an englishman is not capable of pronouncing “ De Moivre ” correctly (as in French), so that English (not him) anglicized the pronounciation of his name is not a surprise.
I don't know if you speak French, but remember me how you pronounce by instance “Lord Beauchamp”, a typical french name ? Or “Fillon” ?
“he found it convenient to move to England” ? In fact, he did as many of the others Huguenots, to escape the persecutions (and his life). The word “convenient” is hardly.
Jan. 21, 2017
Philippe Bodard edited this comment Jan. 21, 2017
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