Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Philippe Bodard
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Hum ! Very easy lead : Fisher/Schwartz never lead hearts when partner has xx or x (there is another example on Bridgewinners where they dont lead with H KJ1098x against 1NT).
These guys are much too strong for me.
Aug. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Were they NS or EW ?
Aug. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yes, his play at trick 1 does matter. On a diamond lead, the best line is easy : ruff, AK spade, and hearts (discard clubs). You win with the trumps 32 (or the queen spade singleton) and no heart singleton in West.
Aug. 16, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Kit,
You said : “This philosophy will avoid foolish false preferences to 2 of the major, playing a 5-2 fit instead of a 4-4 fit”.
Surely, it is exact in theory, but I think it is only a dream, because there is a big difference between the opening of 1H and 1S and also because the bridge is a wargame.
Some years ago, I asked F. Colin (now passed away), a French expert who had collected the biggest data base of bridge hands in the world, from the World and European Bridge Championship. My question was about the sequence beginning by 1H-1NT-2C (I want to know if there is a reason to not play 2C as forcing). Note that as the data base was not only on the last years, the players don’t play 2C as artificial (Gazzilli).
The result was not surprising for me : only three times (over tens of thousand deals), the bidder was able to play this contract of two clubs ! (because the dealer has a good hand or because of bad breaks).
The reason was obvious , it was because of the opponents !
Suppose the sequence 1H-1NT-2C-pass : the N°4 will bid every time, he is a big favorite to have spades (at least 3, and he knows you don’t have the suit). So, he is going balancing. It is even more true in matchpoints .
On the contrary, if you make a “foolish” false preference to 2 H, the situation is more complex for the N°4, because he doesn’t know the strength of the dealer, and he is not on the balancing seat (N°4 have to pass over 1NT very often with 5S). If you pass 2C, the opponents know you have a fit (generally), and almost always, they have too a fit. With a false preference, it will be more difficult balancing the deal (also with 4H, N°4 pass).
So, with 4 clubs and 2 hearts, I almost always bid 2H even if I don’t play 1NT forcing (and always when I have only 2 cards of spade G/G or G/Red, or when I have an honor in hearts). If not, I know I will be obliged to play at least 3C after the balancing. It is also very good when I have 8+ points because partner can make an effort with 2NT (I can reject with 3C). I know this problem don’t exist with your Precision System because the opening is limited to 15
With the opening of 1S, it is less obvious to make a false preference, because if there is a balancing bid, you can always win the contract by bidding 2S over their auction.
Aug. 6, 2015
Philippe Bodard edited this comment Aug. 6, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
1S-1NT = 100% forcing
1H-1S/1NT = a kind of inversion Kaplan, with 1S= 0/4S or if 5S, FG
and 1NT = 5+S,4/11, forcing one round.
Aug. 4, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
But you have always 10 tricks (I. e. clubs are 3-2) without the diamond finesse (5C+1S+2K=2H = 10)
July 30, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Hum ! Difficult to pick up eleven tricks with the diamond finesse when you have already lost two spades and have to loose the ace of clubs.
July 30, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
to Yuan Shen : In this case, you should not say “7/17”. If I play the “variable notrump opening”, I cannot say “10/17”.
As in some particular Polish Club, I think the best explanation is that the partner considers 2NT as always weak, so he can stop in 3C or 3D. If the opener bids again, he has 14/17 with a very good distribution (6/5);
Otherwise, it is absolutely unplayable.
May 4, 2015
Philippe Bodard edited this comment May 4, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yes, curious system, unplayable ! But I suspect that it is more exactly weak (under 10) or 14+/17 (with only very good shape in this case)
May 4, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Steve Robinson said “It is not trivial defending against it (Woolsey convention, a kind of Multi).
In Europe, Multi, the opening, and the overcall (Woolsey) are very common (In France, the convention is only forbidden in competition for ….the beginners ! We have 1200 bridge-clubs, and I would be very surprised to learn that in a club the ”Multi" would be forbidden !): I play it (Multi) since 1981. So, is the defense very difficult ? Yes, it was. I remember that many defenses were proposed : all have a common point, not very good, sometimes very bad.
But since about 8 or 9 years, in France, I can say that there is a very good defense, and very easy to memorize : when you want to bid, you have to consider the opening (or the overcall) is TWO SPADES.

So, after 1NT (2D):
Double : I have 4H
2H/2S = natural; 2NT and 3x = your choice of system (I prefer Rubensohn)

After :
1NT (2D) pass 2H
pass pass X = T/O (4 spades)

1NT (2D) pass 2H
pass 2S X = penalty

The very big advantage of this method is that you always can make a penalty double and also a Stayman !

May 4, 2015
Philippe Bodard edited this comment May 4, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You said “I don't have a huge amount of sympathy with E-W”
I am OK, but I must add, I have no sympathy at all for the NS bidding.
Oct. 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I must correct : it is a psychic (weak opening),but what are the cicumstances ? (a psychic under the Precision System, or a psychic under the classic system with forgetting their convention)
Oct. 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In France (WBF laws), law 40, you can make a psychic.
But more precisely (French laws) there are 5 levels of competition : only in the weakest (level 5), all psychic openings are forbidden.
And of course, if it is an habit to make psychic beetween the partners, you violate the law 40.

I think here the problem is more complex : is it a psychic or a mistake (not the habit to play Precision)?
Oct. 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Surely it's only humor ! (To change of the very serious nature of the laws)

I maintien the score (two hearts) and give… three penalties…to NS !
1) it's obvious that NS played a kind of polish “strong pass system” (at least South) : no alert, so penalty.
2) the second pass by South was surely also conventional in modern bridge, because of the lack of overcall of one heart : no alert, so, penalty
3) with the ACBL laws, it is a forbidden system : so, penalty

And because it's a lucky day for NS, I give up the idea of a penalty because of excessive appeal.

Quite the oppositive, the EW bids are very logical; every people knows that the best defense against “strong pass system” is to use their system. So, the opening of one club means “'I don't have any kind of opening”, exactly what he as ! And the response of one diamond (negative bid) also means “'I don't have any kind of opening”, the correct bid ! Accordingly, no penalty.
And let me tell you two stories about strong pass systems and polish conventions, the first is a joke, the second is a real story.
Two polish pairs play together a “strong pass system”:
- Pass (I have an opening bid, 12+)
- Pass (I also have an opening bid, 12+)
- Double (Take-out, I have an opening bid, 12+)
- Well, it’s good for me, I pass !
The second is an old story, before the fall of Berlin Wall. The (strong) polish players at this period were in the habit of coming to Juan les Pins, a French resort, to play at the biggest open tournament of Europe, because the money prize were a small fortune for any polish people.
So, a polish pair meet a French pair (there is no bidding box at this period)
First French player : “Two clubs” (very strong)
First polish player : “Two NT”, alerted
- What is ?
- Indefinite two-suited !
- Small hesitation due to the effect of surprise, then “ Double”.
- The second polish : “What is this double ?” !!
- “The two others ” was the french response !!
And believe or not, the polish players called the Tournament Director, Jean Thirel, to complain !

Oct. 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I choose “other” because I play :

1NT 2D 2H 2S = invitational with 5H

1NT 2C 2D 2H always invitational with = 1)44 M 2)5H 4S 3) 4H unbal (ex. x,KJxx,QJxxx,Vxx if NT 15/17). Opener obviously dont pass with only two cards in hearts. 2S by opener is relay (usually with 3H) to :2NT = 44M, 3C = 5C, 3D= 5D, 3H = 5H 4S

1NT 2C 2D 2S always invitational with = 1)5S 2) 5S4H 3) 4S unbal (3C by opener is relay)

I play NT 12/14 and no garbage Stayman, but with 4 major (or only 3) and 5+ minor, I can always make a Stayman very weak (not invitational) because I play Transfer after the Stayman (rebid of 2NT = 5 clubs; 3C = 5 diamonds, weak or strong)
Oct. 7, 2014
.

Bottom Home Top