Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Phillip Martin
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I think it's fairly standard for the first discard in the suit led to clarify the count.
Nov. 11
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I didn’t say that partner isn’t 3136. I said his carding isn’t consistent with 3136. Almost surely he is indeed 3136 and miscarded when he played the club deuce.
Nov. 10
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A club works just as well with that construction, since partner can play spades from his side. If you lead a spade, declarer can duck it. Now you have no recourse. You must lose the club trick or endplay partner.
Nov. 10
Phillip Martin edited this comment Nov. 10
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Actually, partner's carding is not consistent with 3-1-3-6–or at least it shouldn't be. When leading fourth best, your next card (if you want to show count) should be up with either 4 or 6 and lowest with 5. There is no particular reason to play that way if, as here, you can't have 4; you could just play present count. But this method is superior if you can have 4, since it creates a 2-card ambiguity (which partner is likely to be able to resolve), whereas present count creates a 1-card ambiguity. Thus, for consistency, one should play this way even if 4 is impossible. This method used to be “standard.” But, perhaps due to the popularity of 3rd and lowest leads (which works well with present count), it has been largely forgotten.
Nov. 10
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Was defending 2 a bad result? Partner can hardly risk a double. And if he reopens with 2, you will bid 3NT, which it's not clear you can make. I gather it does make or you wouldn't be unhappy with your result. But looking at these two hands, I'm not sure I would mind defending 2.
Nov. 7
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If I re-open, there are two scenarios where I will probably regret it: (1) Partner has spades. (2) Partner doesn't have spades.
Nov. 6
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Not sure who first suggested this. But the idea was around before Andy and Oliver even learned to play bridge, which makes it all the more surprising that it still isn't better known.
Nov. 6
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Not legally.
Nov. 5
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Wow! He trusted you. He concluded you wouldn’t have shifted to a heart with the hand you held. I hope you thanked him.
Nov. 5
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If we assume partner has three diamonds, a spade works when partner has either major suit ace and a club works when he has the club king. I would rather play for two chances than for one. So a spade looks right. Currently a heart is the top choice, which I don't understand. What am I missing? When is a heart ever superior to a spade?
Nov. 5
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Edgar argued that 3 should be forcing in this auction. Obviously, he contended, you were intending to reverse. And reversing values plus a fit constitute a game force. I'm not sure I agree, but there are times I wish I did.
Nov. 5
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I see the wording of the problem has been changed and partner is indeed not a passed hand. I still bid 2, but it's not as obvious a choice now.
Nov. 5
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2 seems normal, especially given partner is a passed hand and won't get excited without a spade fit. But I can't imagine being revolted by a suggestion of 1 or 3, so I'm curious what your suggestion was.
Nov. 4
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3, although obviously I'm less happy about it than if partner had reopened with a double.
Nov. 4
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So far I'm the only passer, but I'm quite confident it's the right choice. The fifth spade makes it easy.
Nov. 4
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If you can't see a reason for declarer to fly ace holding the queen, why would you expect partner to signal possession of the queen?
Nov. 2
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3 is successful only if our side can take exactly nine tricks? It scores higher than 4 any time we take fewer than nine tricks as well. Even at IMPs that would be a consideration, since our auction allows them to double if hearts are splitting badly. So 4 could convert -100 into -500. (I do agree with 4; I just don’t buy the “small target” argument.)
Nov. 2
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Thanks for allowing me to answer the problem (instead of instructing me to bid 7NT if I would not have doubled).
Nov. 2
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Another possible reason is that, if the asker doesn't have the queen, there is no story to tell and you don't hear about it.
Oct. 27
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I agree with those who say this is a poor way to phrase the question. But it wouldn't occur to me to draw any inference about whether the player has the trump queen or not.
Oct. 26
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