Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Phillip Martin
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If you have hearts, you can simply raise to whatever level is appropriate. The reason to play that a cue-bid shows support is so that you can play jump raises as pre-emptive. In this auction, you don't need to pre-empt, since LHO has shown no interest in bidding. Accordingly, I play 2 as natural. I don't think 2 does this hand justice, however, so I would bid 3. As for 2NT, that should be natural as well (but based on a source of tricks in diamonds, since you would have started with double with a balanced hand in that range). As a general rule, 2NT is unusual only if the auction makes 3NT an implausible final contract. That is not the case here.
June 7, 2012
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Yes, it was a blunder. I'm sure Lowenthal's ghost appeared on the other side of the table glaring at you the minute you overtook.
June 3, 2012
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There are degrees in between “clearcut” and “tossup.” My vote is for “Pass with trepidation.”
June 3, 2012
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Yes, for the reasons you give. And I'm someone who generally answers “No” to the question “Is this forcing?” without waiting to hear the auction.
June 3, 2012
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Partner had ways to involve me, so I think it's a violation of captaincy to bid 6. I can double with unexpected defense. Otherwise, I'm expected to pass.
June 3, 2012
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My ‘abstain’ is a vote for 3. 3NT might be right, but it rates to go down several if it doesn't make, so I need better odds than usual to bid it. I don't understand 3 at all. If I'm going to bid something I have no real confidence in making, why not bid something that pays a bonus if it makes?
June 1, 2012
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Chuck Lamprey's rule: If you have two suits and the opponents bid one of them, you'd better bid the other one right away. If you don't, the opponents might bid it. Then you would no suits left to bid.
May 30, 2012
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When two tricks is all we are looking for, I don't understand why partner would encourage clubs with anything other than the king.
May 29, 2012
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That makes a huge difference. I have to discard my whole analysis now, since it was predicated on the assumption that partner had a singleton heart and that, therefore, declarer could not have seven black cards. But if we are playing UDCA, shouldn't partner have the K? He has no reason to encourage with anything else. In that case, maybe the Q is doubleton after all. Declarer needs at least one spade finesse, so it doesn't hurt to block the diamonds. Thus it's probably a good idea to do so and keep the defense in the dark. I'm changing my vote to “win and play a club.”
May 28, 2012
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That was meant as a reply to Bill Hall's comment above (#3). The ‘Reply to this comment’ link does seems to nest the comments the way it used to.
May 28, 2012
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If partner's deuce of hearts is honest, declarer can't have two spades and five clubs.
May 28, 2012
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Aha! So you were East, not West on this problem? Admittedly it's not 100% that East has the Q. But West tends to assume that when South makes his queen-ask. As long as East holds onto the Q, West knows diamonds aren't running. When East plays it, West can't be sure. Since South knows the diamond position, there is no reason for East not to clarify it for his partner. Taking that logic a step further, West is entitled to assume when East plays the queen that he had no choice. He would have clarified the position by playing another card if he could.
May 28, 2012
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Partner seems to have miscarded when he played the Q. Since I know he has that card, he shouldn't play it unless it's his last diamond. But if declarer started with J10xx, he would have unblocked an honor. That would be a horrendous error, so I'm going to believe declarer. If I win and play a spade honor, I don't see how he can make it unless he has 98 doubleton of spades and four solid clubs. He has at most six black cards. So if he is 3-3, he might take four spades and three clubs; and if he is 2-4 (without 98 doubleton) he might take three spades and four clubs; and if he is 1-5, he might take two spades and five clubs. But that's only 11 tricks. A low spade is wrong, since it gives him four spade tricks if he has 9x. Ducking the heart king might let him revert to diamonds and take twelve tricks. And winning and playing a club is wrong, since I will be caught in a major-suit squeeze if declarer is 1-5-2-5.
May 28, 2012
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2
May 26, 2012
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Perhaps Joe will clarify, but I interpreted his remark differently than you did. When he said he would not sacrifice if he thought he was losing, I assumed he meant for the usual reason: When you are trying to rack up a large score, your goal is to go plus at both tables. Sacrificing, and thus guaranteeing a minus score, is usually not a good idea. In general, sacrificing is a strategy for avoiding large losses rather than for finding large pickups.
May 24, 2012
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Correct.
May 21, 2012
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I'm curious where you encountered Culbertson's Rule. I don't recall seeing it in print except in Culbertson's books. There are all kinds of gems like that in his books. Since he counted honor tricks rather than high-card points, visualizing potential hands for partner was actually a little easier in his methods, and he had a lot to say about this kind of “plastic valuation” as he called it.
May 17, 2012
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The only thing I seriously object to is playing the double as ambiguous. I want to know what suit opener is short in (and if it's clubs, responder's two hearts should be natural). To clarify Jeff's suggestion (as I understand it), he believes opener's double should be specifically short clubs. With short hearts, opener can usually afford to pass, anticipating that responder has a trap pass and will reopen with a cooperative double. I see the merit to this suggestion, but it does violate one of my general principles: Whenever possible, you should define doubles to mean the same thing from either side of the table. If a direct double is take-out, a reopening double should be take-out.
May 17, 2012
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I was hoping no one would ask that, because my answer is out in left field.

First of all, remember that we are playing weak notrumps and four-card majors. So we raise diamonds more frequently than standard bidders. That means if the auction starts 1-1-P, there is fair chance that responder's longest suits are hearts and clubs, and an ambiguous double of 2 by opener would nail responder to the wall. He will probably want to pass but will be afraid to for fear that clubs is opener's shortness. By requiring the double to show club “support,” we allow responder to pass freely, which is probably what he wants to do anyway.

As you point out, this does give opener a problem with a 4-3-5-1 pattern. One possibility is to bid an imperfect two diamonds. Another is to bid two hearts, defined as a non-forcing take-out of clubs. As Lowenthal used to say, “Often the best place to play a misfit is in the opponents' suit. If trumps split five-one, the opponents can't crossruff.”
May 17, 2012
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It wasn't a computer simulation. It was a factor analysis of hands from the World Championships that tried to quantify the effect of various features (suit quality, side defense, seat, vulnerability, etc.) on the results obtained from pre-empting. The analysis reached a number of counter-intuitive conclusions, the fact that holding the ace of your suit was a plus rather than a minus being one of them. I was never entirely comfortable with my methodology, however, and the study is some 25 years old at this point. I would love to see someone do it again, preferably someone who understands better than I do how to do this kind of analysis. I nominate either Henry Bethe or Dick Zeckhauser.
May 13, 2012
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