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All comments by Phillip Martin
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North 100%. He made a limit bid, then bid again with no invitation from partner. Partners have been shot for less. Of course, if I were South, I would be very grateful that he did that. If he passed, I would probably bid five spades myself. Then it would be my fault.
June 16, 2012
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The five. When you choose to lead a spot card in the opponents' suit, standard practice is to lead the lowest. It is sometimes necessary for technical reasons, so it makes things easier for partner if you do so as a matter of course.
June 14, 2012
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As a general rule, if you have to ask, it's not forcing.
June 14, 2012
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Few comments is good? I feel so much better now!
June 13, 2012
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I assume you have the ones from the 1998 World Championships. Those are all I could find.
June 13, 2012
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Certainly not. Don't think you can trick me into agreeing to something just because it's logical.
June 12, 2012
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If pass were forcing, that's what I would do. But I don't think it is. I could have been saving with 4NT.
June 12, 2012
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I was sure that, about 30 years ago, you told me that the average number of imps per board is 3 with a standard deviation of 5. At least those are the numbers I've been using for computations like this all these years. Am I remembering incorrectly, or has bridge gotten swingier since then?
June 12, 2012
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Exactly. This hand could be a book example of what pass followed by bidding clubs shows.
June 11, 2012
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I usually play cue-bids as choice-of-games, but I would not do so here. I have already expressed doubt about strain by making a negative double, so there is no need to send that message twice.
June 9, 2012
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If you have hearts, you can simply raise to whatever level is appropriate. The reason to play that a cue-bid shows support is so that you can play jump raises as pre-emptive. In this auction, you don't need to pre-empt, since LHO has shown no interest in bidding. Accordingly, I play 2 as natural. I don't think 2 does this hand justice, however, so I would bid 3. As for 2NT, that should be natural as well (but based on a source of tricks in diamonds, since you would have started with double with a balanced hand in that range). As a general rule, 2NT is unusual only if the auction makes 3NT an implausible final contract. That is not the case here.
June 7, 2012
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Yes, it was a blunder. I'm sure Lowenthal's ghost appeared on the other side of the table glaring at you the minute you overtook.
June 3, 2012
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There are degrees in between “clearcut” and “tossup.” My vote is for “Pass with trepidation.”
June 3, 2012
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Yes, for the reasons you give. And I'm someone who generally answers “No” to the question “Is this forcing?” without waiting to hear the auction.
June 3, 2012
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Partner had ways to involve me, so I think it's a violation of captaincy to bid 6. I can double with unexpected defense. Otherwise, I'm expected to pass.
June 3, 2012
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My ‘abstain’ is a vote for 3. 3NT might be right, but it rates to go down several if it doesn't make, so I need better odds than usual to bid it. I don't understand 3 at all. If I'm going to bid something I have no real confidence in making, why not bid something that pays a bonus if it makes?
June 1, 2012
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Chuck Lamprey's rule: If you have two suits and the opponents bid one of them, you'd better bid the other one right away. If you don't, the opponents might bid it. Then you would no suits left to bid.
May 30, 2012
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When two tricks is all we are looking for, I don't understand why partner would encourage clubs with anything other than the king.
May 29, 2012
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That makes a huge difference. I have to discard my whole analysis now, since it was predicated on the assumption that partner had a singleton heart and that, therefore, declarer could not have seven black cards. But if we are playing UDCA, shouldn't partner have the K? He has no reason to encourage with anything else. In that case, maybe the Q is doubleton after all. Declarer needs at least one spade finesse, so it doesn't hurt to block the diamonds. Thus it's probably a good idea to do so and keep the defense in the dark. I'm changing my vote to “win and play a club.”
May 28, 2012
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That was meant as a reply to Bill Hall's comment above (#3). The ‘Reply to this comment’ link does seems to nest the comments the way it used to.
May 28, 2012
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