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All comments by Phillip Martin
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He is asking one compound question. To reword his question to make it clearer: “Is it true either that A) leading the 8 spot from J8xx is both suggested widely when playing attitude leads and can be costly for the leader or that B) leading the 8 spot from 108xx is both suggested widely when playing attitude leads and can be costly for the leader?”

So if, as Karen says below, you want to answer ‘no’ to the first part and ‘yes’ to the second part, your correct answer is ‘yes.’
Oct. 14
Phillip Martin edited this comment Oct. 14
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Yes, your line works. Mine doesn't, since it gives South other winning options.
Oct. 12
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How about this line? Declarer wins the spade, plays a heart to the ace. He plays a diamond from dummy. North must play low, else declarer can take three diamond tricks. Declarer inserts the jack, cashes all his red cards, and plays a low club. South inserts the 10. Declarer must duck, else North will have a club entry with his nine. South plays ace and queen of clubs and a club to dummy's jack. Declarer is now down to xx – x – in dummy and A95 – – – in his hand, needing two of the last three tricks. He leads a spade from dummy and must cover North's 8 with his 9. South wins and leads a low spade. If dummy's last spade is the 7 or 6, declarer is locked in dummy with a diamond loser. The play in the club suit seems to be critical. Unless declarer is forced to win the fourth round of clubs with dummy's jack, I don't believe the spade blockage is fatal. But I'm not entirely sure about that.
Oct. 12
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Since you bring it up, Debbie, I’ll clarify. I initially assumed that the hand couldn’t be made. When a non-human advised me it could, I looked harder and found the winning line. So I did find the line myself, but I wouldn’t have without the additional push. I think that’s how computers should be used. Having them find the line of play for you seems pointless.
Oct. 11
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It may be an inferior lead. Still, “That's more or less what happens on the actual hand” isn't exactly accurate. Perhaps that's what should happen on the actual hand. But so far no one has found the winning line.
Oct. 10
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4 can't deny a heart control. Partner is limited and I'm captain. Any information I offer is on a need-to-know basis.
Oct. 9
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Give it a try before you reject it. My experience has been that passing with these hands is a big winner: https://sites.google.com/site/psmartinsite/Home/bridge-articles/the-cooperative-pass
Oct. 9
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Passing rates to get +200 if partner has club length. And the fifth spade makes it easy to catch up if he doesn't: If partner doubles, I can bid 3.
Oct. 9
OK?
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With some partners, I would open 1 with the black suits reversed, since passing with this much playing strength doesn't appeal and pre-empting risks missing a spade fit. I don't see much point in 1 with this hand.
Oct. 9
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If we assume, as Kit did, that our best chance is to hope the lead was a singleton and that West has AK, you can play West to be 1-2-7-3 with Jx. Win the A, ruff a diamond, then draw only two rounds of trump and play a club. When you get to dummy in clubs, play ace and queen of diamonds, pitching two spades. West must give you a ruff-sluff.

Loser-on-loser plays can be easy to overlook. This one is particularly easy to overlook because you must combine it with a partial trump elimination.

As for the “weirdness” of the opening lead, I was West and it was the opening lead I chose. While I would probably lead from AK and length in preference to a stiff spade, I'm not a fan of leading from AK-third. My experience has been that, since this is often a suit declarer needs to attack himself, the lead helps him more often than not.
Oct. 9
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Sorry. Fourth best leads.
Oct. 9
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I recently played an event with Woolsey after about 30 seconds of discussion, which included agreeing to play upside down count and attitude. We had an accident when I misread his present count card. (He intended it as rightside up.) “John and I always played present count as upside down also,” I said. “In fact, I wasn't even aware that anyone played differently until I read the discussion on BridgeWinners.” “If you read the discussion on BridgeWinners,” Kit said, “then you should know I played rightside up present count. That makes the accident your fault.”
Sept. 24
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My calculation implicitly assumes he will randomize with two “honors” in clubs. As some have pointed out above, it is unlikely he will randomize with J9, so we should reduce the number of cases the finesse is right by 3 (taking away half of the 6 cases of J9 doubleton). That makes it 15 to 13, closer to your answer. But that's still an underestimate, because it assumes North has only 10 cards in his suits. Your 11 to 10 result seems suspect to me.
July 27
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Personally, I'm quite comfortable living in a world where not all of us care about the same things.
July 27
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It's easier to count cases than to work with percentages. If we assume North has 3 round cards, then he has a stiff club honor (so to speak) 18 times (4C2 doubleton spades X 3 stiff clubs) and two club honors 12 times (4 singleton spades X 3 doubleton clubs)–plus 1 more case for J109 of clubs. So the odds are 18 to 13 to finesse even before considering that he might have fewer than 3 round cards.
July 27
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A delayed 2NT should be natural, based on long clubs and showing a hand too good to overcall 1NT on the previous round. One reason to play that way is to keep partner from bidding it on hands like this.
July 27
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Multiple choice answers should partition the universe.
June 16
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“Suppose declarer's shape is 2-5-1-5 with Qx of spades. If you return a trump, when you get in you can lead another trump, and declarer will be unable to avoid the loss of a club trick. However, if you lead back a spade and partner fails to find a trump shift (likely he will try to give you a spade ruff), declarer can score 8 trump tricks, 1 club trick, and 1 spade trick.”

Even a trump shift by partner won’t work. He is caught in a Morton’s fork. If he doesn’t cash the diamond ace, he loses it. If he does, the defense loses its chance to lead a second trump.
June 16
Phillip Martin edited this comment June 16
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Four of a major is usually the better game when most of the high cards are in one hand. The lack of communication makes 3NT problematic.

Even if your hearts were AQx instead of AJx, it's probably right to play in the major. Partner averages less than half the remaining high cards, and the opponents have as many hearts as partner does. So he is less than 50% to have the K.
June 3
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Since I'm probably going to have to guess diamonds to make this, I might as well play them now. Playing them now has two ways to win: (1) It's possible I can't afford to lose the lead twice. Playing diamonds now is the only way to avoid that. (2) I have some slim chance to make this even if I misguess diamonds. That chance is better if I haven't conceded a heart trick.
May 28
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