Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Phillip Martin
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Take away the heart ace, and it's even clearer to act. Now partner's expected point count is 12.
Dec. 27, 2019
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Other: The BIT suggests he isn't sure what he should do.
Dec. 25, 2019
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Actually, non vul, I would. You'd have to make the hand a tad stronger before I'd feel comfortable passing.
Dec. 24, 2019
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Face down, I hope.
Dec. 23, 2019
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Fortunately lack of discussion is not a problem. However he would interpret a double, I don't have it.
Dec. 23, 2019
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I doubt if anyone thinks this hand isn't “good enough” to open 2. Those who chose 1 probably simply think it's unsuitable.
Dec. 23, 2019
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It could do that. It could also prevent you from finding a profitable 3 contract if the opponents can make two of a red suit and if partner can raise clubs should you bid them. It's not clear to me which scenario is more likely, but obviously either pass or 2 could work out badly.
Dec. 22, 2019
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Of course it does. So do 3, 3NT, 4, 4, and 4.
Dec. 21, 2019
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11.9 is correct. I carelessly entered ‘xxx’ for the diamond suit when I entered the hand into my Jupyter notebook. I forgot you actually get something for the 9 when it is accompanied by the 8.
Dec. 20, 2019
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John's comment brings up a question: If you double, when do you expect partner to pull?
Dec. 20, 2019
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I got 11.75.
Dec. 20, 2019
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I'm curious. Was 3NT a good contract that just happened to go down?
Dec. 20, 2019
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There are situations where it is wrong for the defender to cash the last heart (e.g., it might set up a squeeze against partner, and you might score down four if you don't cash it). So the fact that you have the first seven tricks doesn't necessarily mean you are going to cash them. It would be foolish for declarer to claim down three. If the defender intends to cash them all and there is no possibility of another trick, it is the defender who should claim.
Dec. 19, 2019
Phillip Martin edited this comment Dec. 19, 2019
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Bill, you if you want to say “bid 7NT if you wish to abstain because you would have taken such and such an action,” that's one thing. But “bid 7NT if you would have taken such and such an action” is different. That forces them to abstain even they would prefer to answer. A good player is perfectly capable of analyzing the pros and cons of various actions in hypothetical situations. To say, in essence, if you wouldn't have taken every action I took up to this point, your opinion is worthless to me, is insulting.
Dec. 19, 2019
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Correct, John. I fixed it.
Dec. 19, 2019
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Gregory, there is a key difference between abstaining and bidding 7NT. Abstaining means you believe the action is so egregious it renders the question moot. But questions like these force you to abstain simply because you would have done something different earlier. Why would any pollster want that? For one thing, it skews the answer. It filters out an arbitrary subset of readers. Would you include an instruction to “bid 7NT if you have eaten a donut in the past 24 hours”? The fact that you might have done something different earlier in the auction does not render your judgment at this point irrelevant any more than your preference for donuts. Why would you not want to hear their opinion?
Dec. 19, 2019
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If someone finds the 1 call so off the wall that he can't answer the problem (which seems hard to imagine), he can always just not answer or abstain. You don't need to offer a special answer for his benefit. But stating the problem this way prohibits one from answering even if he has no serious objection to 1 but simply wouldn't have bid it himself. If you have two questions, why not just submit two polls? I always abstain on “bid 7NT if…” problems whether or not I approve of the prior actions, because I object on principle to having my ability to answer conditional on such approval.
Dec. 18, 2019
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I'll never understand these 7NT requests. Why do you not care what someone would do now if he would have passed over 1? Why is so important to exclude anyone who might have done something different earlier from answering the problem at hand?
Dec. 18, 2019
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I would have bid 3 on the previous round.
Dec. 16, 2019
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I would happily adopt this strategy if you and John Nash were my teammates at the other table. I suspect no other set of teammates would understand if I went down.
Dec. 15, 2019
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