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All comments by Phillip Martin
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I don't know how to answer a multiple choice question when one of the answers is another question.
Oct. 25, 2019
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I tend to avoid 2NT openings if I can open 1 of a suit without rebid problems. If you have a slam, it will be easier to bid after opening 1 of a suit. If you don't have game, whatever partscore you reach after opening 1 of suit will probably be easier to make than 2NT. And if you do have game, it probably doesn't matter what you open. This hand, however, I would open 2NT, because a 1 response over 1 gives me a serious problem. If you promised me partner wasn't going to respond 1, I would open 1.
Oct. 23, 2019
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Attitude signals at trick one, particularly in suit contracts, should usually suggest how you believe the defense should proceed rather than show something specific in the suit led. So a discouraging heart simply says continuing hearts looks like the wrong idea to you; it does not deny the ace.
Oct. 22, 2019
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Now I'm intrigued. What would you do if partner's singleton club was the 3, and what would you do differently–and why–if it was the 4?
Oct. 21, 2019
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You won't overcall with all hands where you would have pre-empted. But there is definitely some overlap. If you have a good suit and shortness in the opponent's suit, passing is dangerous, since partner (who is presumably lacking shortness in their suit) may be unable to act. With 3 or more cards in their suit, there is less reason to be aggressive.
Oct. 20, 2019
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You certainly might lead the A without the king. So if you continue clubs and don't want partner ruffing, you'd better continue with the king.
Oct. 20, 2019
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“What I think it means is that if you have a hand that is suitable for an opening preempt but one of your opponents beats you to making an opening preempt.., then don't make an overcall over this preempt, as your hand is not suitable for one.”

That's not what it means. You might well make a simple overcall with a hand where you would have opened with a pre-empt. It just means that you shouldn't jump with such a hand, since a jump is defined as strength-showing.
Oct. 20, 2019
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4 should show the 3-card limit raise. 3 is either the genuine-support-but-too-weak-for-2 hand or a preference with a doubleton, leaving open the possibility of exploring other strains. The need to bid 3 on the latter type means you can't reserve 3 for good hands, so even if you normally play fast arrival, it doesn't work in this sequence.
Oct. 20, 2019
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3 seems to be the popular choice, but if partner has no help in hearts it may keep us out of 3NT when that's where we belong. Of course, it may also keep us out of 3NT when that's not where we belong.
Oct. 19, 2019
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No doubt influenced by Adam Meredith's 1 openings.
Oct. 18, 2019
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If John had ever thrown this auction at me, I'm sure he would have intended it as natural. He once overcalled 3 over a 1 opening with KQJ109xxx Kx x xx. (It turned out the 1 opener, Keith Garber, had psyched. Responder, who held a flat 14-count, bid 3NT. I doubled, and we took all 13 tricks.)
Oct. 18, 2019
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If I feel the hand is too good for 2 but not good enough for 1, why do you want me to bid 7NT? Why can't I just answer what I would bid?
Oct. 17, 2019
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I see no reason to overtake. (Partner can't have a club void –see comment above.) So I encourage to stop a diamond shift. I have no idea what our best defense is, but partner should be able to work out I have the moderate hand with long clubs, so perhaps he can figure it out.
Oct. 17, 2019
Phillip Martin edited this comment Oct. 17, 2019
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Partner wouldn't lead the heart king with a club void. If he chose to lead an honor, he would lead the queen.
Oct. 17, 2019
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The old-fashioned way to play after an overcall of 1NT was that non-jumps in new suits (except for 3) were non-forcing (being able to compete is more important than having a delicate forcing auction). 2NT was natural but only mildly invitational–it could be competitive with a hand where you would have passed had RHO passed. Thus you just bid game with a good invitation and opener took this into account. Doubles were for penalty.
Oct. 16, 2019
Phillip Martin edited this comment Oct. 17, 2019
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I don't recognize the quote, but I know who it is, since the style in unmistakable. I think there are only two books in the series I haven't read. This is obviously from one of them.
Oct. 14, 2019
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I'm not defending anything. I'm just pointing out that this is, in fact, a single question, consisting of a disjunction of two conjunctions.
Oct. 14, 2019
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He is asking one compound question. To reword his question to make it clearer: “Is it true either that A) leading the 8 spot from J8xx is both suggested widely when playing attitude leads and can be costly for the leader or that B) leading the 8 spot from 108xx is both suggested widely when playing attitude leads and can be costly for the leader?”

So if, as Karen says below, you want to answer ‘no’ to the first part and ‘yes’ to the second part, your correct answer is ‘yes.’
Oct. 14, 2019
Phillip Martin edited this comment Oct. 14, 2019
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Yes, your line works. Mine doesn't, since it gives South other winning options.
Oct. 12, 2019
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How about this line? Declarer wins the spade, plays a heart to the ace. He plays a diamond from dummy. North must play low, else declarer can take three diamond tricks. Declarer inserts the jack, cashes all his red cards, and plays a low club. South inserts the 10. Declarer must duck, else North will have a club entry with his nine. South plays ace and queen of clubs and a club to dummy's jack. Declarer is now down to xx – x – in dummy and A95 – – – in his hand, needing two of the last three tricks. He leads a spade from dummy and must cover North's 8 with his 9. South wins and leads a low spade. If dummy's last spade is the 7 or 6, declarer is locked in dummy with a diamond loser. The play in the club suit seems to be critical. Unless declarer is forced to win the fourth round of clubs with dummy's jack, I don't believe the spade blockage is fatal. But I'm not entirely sure about that.
Oct. 12, 2019
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