Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Prashanth Sriram
1 2 3
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Alvin, thanks for the explanation, it really helps!
Feb. 25, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Upon carefully re-reading the Phillip Martin article, I realized that there was no talk of switching the choice of the door at all.

“Showman that he is, he intentionally showed you a booby prize to heighten the suspense. Since you already knew that at least one of the other two doors held a booby prize, you have learned nothing. You still have the same one chance in three that you started with.”

Hence, the original selection continues to have a probability of 1/3 and the remaining unopened door has a probability of 2/3 of having the jackpot. This is consistent with my understanding of the Monty Hall problem and Marilyn vos Savant's explanation. I was just thrown off by Martin's tone that nothing has changed - but I realize now that he was only talking about the expected return of the originally selected door.

Thanks Eugene. I only had to read the Phillip Martin with a little more care to “get it”.
Feb. 24, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I once played this lead agreement with one partner. Under this lead agreement, the second card played by East would be the 6. Now, seeing the 3 still out, West should find the shift to the K.

On this hand, all is well. But if declarer played this way from JT3, or if the hand were a little different, you would be in trouble. Knowing the count is usually more important than knowing where the honours are.
Dec. 4, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Playing for Ax with either opponent: I duck this spade, win the return, duck another spade (hoping the A comes down), then cash the K.
If this works, we still have to negotiate clubs for one loser.
Nov. 25, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Transfer to clubs, if there is a superaccept then bid 5 else bid a natural 3. If he bids 3NT correct to 4.
Nov. 23, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I have played both precision variants described in the OP:

Rodwell style:
-> 14-16 1NT
-> 1-1M-1NT is 11-13 balanced and 2+

Unbalanced diamond:
-> 12-15 1NT
-> 1 is unbalanced with 4+

The main problem with the latter is the loss of accuracy in auctions starting with 1NT, which are very frequent. Granted, the 1NT opening is great in a “destructive” sense and throws your opponents bidding off quite often, but is also bad for constructive bidding if you have such a wide range. Range enquiry stayman helps improve the accuracy of constructive bidding after the 1NT opening.

On the other hand, it helps a lot with 1 openings, where both the opening bid and follow ups better define the hand. Knowing 1 is a real suit helps in competitive bidding and allows you to play standard inverted minors. 1-1!M-1NT tends to show a singleton in partner's suit (or you can choose to bid that way on some 2245 / 2254 hands). 1-1M-2M is very common on 3 card support as the opener will have ruffing capability most of the time, hence 1-1M-2 and 1-1M-2 denies 3 card support.

There are other issues and nuances (passing balanced 11 point hands in any seat can sting). But if you have the methods and judgment to handle a wide ranging 1NT, there are genuine merits to the unbalanced diamond opening.
Nov. 20, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Agreed, but I would venture to add: a hand that has something going for it on offense.

A 3433 minimum with wasted values in spades for example, should be passed.

On this hand I voted 3 but it was close.
Nov. 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I would have liked to make a stronger bid the last round in order to set up a forcing pass and bring partner into the decision.

On this sequence, pass would not be forcing and I need to make a decision on my own. I choose X because the declarer is going to face bad breaks and there are many good things that may happen on defense, such as a couple of heart ruffs straight up.
Nov. 14, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
At the table, I might well have done exactly the same things the declarer did so far.

My next step would be to play hearts from the top and hope for 4-4 or queen dropping on the third round so that there are only two heart losers. Whoever wins the last heart has to give dummy an entry or lead diamonds - clearly they will do the latter. This gives us multiple chances to make - diamonds 3-3, Kx onside, etc.
Nov. 14, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Declarer's hand wasn't good enough to make a jump shift on the earlier turn. Somehow the combination of the spade bid and heart tolerance with dummy has improved his hand, to justify the leap to game. I would expect spade honours in declarer's hand for this sequence, and hence, club shortness. That made the club lead attractive for me.
Nov. 12, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I bid 3NT because the 3 raise denies 4 carder in most precision structures. If your structure allows responder to hold 4 spades, then I bid 3.
Nov. 4, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Probably why Chuck put a question mark after the word “teacher”!
Oct. 31, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
At IMPS I'm going to slam, but I'd like to fish for a 4-4 club fit if possible. I'm hoping that partner reads 6 as an offer to play, but will correct to 6 if he doesn't have a decent club suit.

This would cater to a hand like QJx Axxxx x AQxx.
Oct. 31, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I agree with you about the rebid problem, but that is why I voted “Yes”.

YES = I am denying to my partner that I have a four card spade suit (even if I do have one).

NO = My partner thinks I could still have a four card spade suit after the 1NT response, and a future bid might clarify it.

At least, that is how I interpret the OP.
Oct. 31, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I went to grad school at Penn State and was the only student at the local bridge club, which was frequented by people living in the area but not necessarily associated with the university. Naturally, there were a handful of professors who played there regularly, but not many. There was no student body or club in the university for bridge at all.

It was much easier at the Indian Institute of Technology where I did my undergrad. There was already a critical mass of bridge players who played in the dorms and taught it to the freshmen. There was an annual tournament that pitted different dorms in the university against each other. There were tournaments in which we invited players from the bridge clubs outside the campus to participate, which gave the students exposure to more serious tournament bridge once in a while. So, I think that to avoid the problem of the game fizzling out in a university once the regular players graduate, it will be good to get it into the dorm culture so that there is a constant stream of new students who learn to play it in the dorm.

I realize that this is not particularly helpful on how to get students to participate in the first place, but it might help you think about what is a sustainable solution.
Sept. 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Agreed, I miscounted in the middle of my line. Don't do BW when at work :)
June 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
(deleted)



June 18, 2014
Prashanth Sriram edited this comment June 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If we are assuming that east's shape is 5512, we can cater to east having any doubleton in clubs including Qx.

Ruff the lead, AK of , ruff a , ruff a , A , ruff a , A , ruff a , K of and exit a club.

If east has Qx in clubs we have already made it. If west had Qxx then he is endplayed into leading a from the queen.

I think the real question is, what do we do if east has a singleton club?
June 18, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I have played the unbalanced 1 in a precision context where I find it quite useful, if you are willing to extend your NT range to 11-15. This means you need some kind of range-showing Stayman.

The situations where it helps in precision are:
- The inverted minor structure for 1-2 does not have to worry about 2 or 3 carder holding any more
- Enables artificial meanings for 1NT and 2NT rebids, which helps us to differentiate between 3 card and 4 card raises of partner's major
- Reverses are well defined, which is important when you reverse with 14 points. 1-1-2 for example will promise 4+ , 4+ , an unbalanced hand and 14-15 points.

And, of course, the lead direction and competitive advantages mentioned by Yuan.

I don't have example hands at the moment but I hope my points were specific enough that you can construct the situations.
April 22, 2014
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You didn't mention the lines chose by your teammates, but how do you feel about an intra-finesse on the first board?

Stick in the J, and it holds.
Now you play a to the 8, losing to the Q.
Let's say a heart comes back and you win the K.
Now run the J. West has to duck.
Run the J.

Whether west covers or not, you have 2 , 3 , 3 tricks and you can lead a to the K for the ninth trick. There are some transportation problems between board and dummy but is it fatal?

If the heart finesse loses (or you decline to take it) at trick 1, I think you need to bank on the honours to all be onside, which also works.
April 16, 2014
1 2 3
.

Bottom Home Top