Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Rui Marques
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Sorry to disagree, Nick. A defender seeing a card doesn't transform it into “maintained into such a position as to indicate something”. Depends on where the card was positioned by declarer. From the initial description, it seems that declarer didn't maintain it in such a position.
Oct. 29, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
declarer must play a card from his hand if it is (a) held face up, touching or nearly touching the table; or (b) maintained in such a position as to indicate that it has been played.

Doesn't seem to be the case, and intending to play it is not the same as playing it.

Dummy called the attention. Can he?

42B2. 2. dummy may try to prevent any irregularity by declarer.

Unless dummy violated 43A2: (a) dummy may not exchange hands with declarer. (b) dummy may not leave his seat to watch declarer’s play. © dummy may not, on his own initiative, look at the face of a card in either defender’s hand.

Then dummy can warn declarer not to lead from the wrong hand, so I would say that the TD decision was not the best.

Declarer can pull a card. Dummy notices it is the wrong lead. Dummy can warn declarer. Declarer, not having played the card yet, can play from the right hand.
Oct. 29, 2015
Rui Marques edited this comment Oct. 29, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ai-Tai, in the context of the Laws, the TD has to ascertain if not noticing the blockage in time is being careless, or irrational. Irrational doesn't mean “very inferior for the class of player”, means something below that. Probably the declarer would have made the contract if he played it, but the mere fact that he claimed without a statement regarding the blockage points to him being careless already. Jacob is right, in saying that the question is not about going to an expert AC and asking if the declarer would normally make the contract. Of course he would. It is to ask if declarer, being careless and playing well below his standard, could go down. If the AC says that not noticing the blocking of the suit is just careless, it is setting a precedent, drawing a line on the sand about careless and irrational. It is not irrational to play badly. Irrational is to play worse than badly…
P.S.1 - Not stating an opinion on the case itself.
P.S.2 - Somebody asked on the thread, and no it is not legal to assign a percentage of making and go down, on a claim
Oct. 29, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Careless is “not careful”. Any careful player will do something, but if they are grossly not careful, they are not being irrational, just careless. Now, is it careless to not unblock? Or is it beyond belief and irrational? Will all the players in the field notice the blockage?

Just asking…
Oct. 29, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
(Serving / Not Serving) food is a strategy. I started directing full time on a club where the cook was the owner, and she was an amazing cook. That helped the bridge tournaments a lot, because players would go there to dinner and play, or we would do two sessions and a meal in between, and everybody would gather on the restaurant and have a great time.
On the other hand, if the food is passable or bad, probably it´s better not to serve it…
Oct. 29, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
With so many facts missing, it is impossible to say. What were exactly the hands, what was the play up to that point, what was exactly said at the table, just for starters. I'm always skeptical when facts are “he had some cards left, etc…”
Oct. 29, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In some areas, or countries, they do. In Portugal I would also face a riot. It comes from the old days of scoring sheets where you could gaze at all the results from previous rounds. Weaker players always think that they “learn” from seeing the results that others did and discussing them between rounds…

But it was one of the things that I liked when I started attending Nationals in the USA, the “no results from other tables” option.
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
“Let's face it, being nice to people takes effort. The type of players who will eventually cut it in the bridge world are people with a bit of ‘mongrel’, not easily put off by rudeness etc”

I understand your view, but I disagree. It shouldn't be a pain to be nice to people and give them a chance to be nice back. It shouldn't be that the people that cut it in are the ones that can withstand rudeness. When we take that view we are throwing the towel and stating that those grumps are essential for bridge, because they “screen” the ones that are able to cope from the other ones…

Unless I misunderstood your point…
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The basic question is, as pointed above, whether 27D would apply regarding the 1H/DBL by West. Given that X is a reasonable choice, even without the restrictions created by the insufficient bid, I don´t think so. The author refers to the poll he created, which shows basically 3C and DBL as reasonable choices. We didn't “stop playing bridge” with the DBL. If W chose a specific, unlikely bid, because of the restrictions that other choices would create on his partner, and that specific bid created a favorable outcome for EW, that would be an example of a case for 27D
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I almost never allow late plays (hesitating to say “never”). It drags the end of the session, and it is contagious, players start slowing down because they know they can ask for a late play and get it.
Oct. 25, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
My first bridge hand in a duplicate tournament…
After learning bridge by myself while on holidays, by coincidence I discovered that a number of other friends had done more or less the same, so we had a table. Eventually, I discovered that there was somethings called a tournament near the university and we decided to give it a try. I learn everything I thought I needed to know about how tournaments were run, and, nervous as hell, I sit down to play.
I get my first hand… Wow… I´m playing a tournament! I sort the cards, and I get something like
KQT1 8751 T9 T71
I pass, it goes all pass, and then I noticed… It was those French cards with a “1” for an Ace…
Oct. 24, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Successful steering a tournament often implies a mixture of “softness” and “toughness”. I was once directing a big festival, and one of those players that think that he should have special rights started some argument with me before the start of a session, eventually crossing “the line in the sand”. I was gonna give him “the talk”, but unfortunately he added “and I am NOT playing anymore!…” I just concluded “so I agree, you don't play then”. He says “fine”, starts walking to the exit door, up a flight of stairs, says something to his partner, his partner comes running down the stairs: “No, he plays, he plays, he apologizes. Come here X, apologize NOW!…”
Oct. 24, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I´m almost sure that there is another side to the story, and the reaction of the revoker, as bad as it was, had more to it than just the revoke and the decision. Maybe if the TD had cared enough the outcome might have been different (or maybe not…)
Oct. 24, 2015
Rui Marques edited this comment Oct. 24, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Gerto, give my regards, a big hug and a gimme five to Erik. I still remember working with him in Estoril, it was so refreshing and inspiring. I learned a lot with him.
Oct. 23, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ben: Thats a great idea, and it is easily done with some scoring programs, already.
Oct. 23, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
But keeping the rhythm is probably the hardest, the more “soft skills” part of running a tournament. Very player dependent. I also sometimes stand behind the slow player, when he is declaring, and as soon the hand comes to the claim stage i try to encourage him to claim (in the club only, of course)
Oct. 23, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
When you have a clock there's no need for the “five minutes”. When you don't, if the tournament goes smoothly you don't need it either. If there is one or two slow pairs i usually stand next to them when i announce, or i just announce to them, personally, sometimes in a soft voice so that he others that are playing in tempo ar not disturbed. It always speeds them up.
Oct. 23, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I see:
All other constructive rebids and responses are permitted - except for: (…)

None of the exceptions seems to apply, so doesn't it make it allowed?
Oct. 23, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
One more… Some ten years ago, playing in some regional championship in Portugal, I get a nice 18 count, something like AQT KTx KQx Kxxx. I open 1, 1 NT, and we end up in 3 NT. I table dummy and partner, not amused, asks if I am kidding. I ask why. Opponents look stunned, like if I was the biggest /%#/&%$ on earth. I look down, and I notice finally that I had this beautiful 4333: 3 spades, 3 diamonds, 3 hearts and… 4 spades!
Oct. 23, 2015
Rui Marques edited this comment Oct. 23, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I once found a missing score sheet one year after the tournament…
Oct. 23, 2015
.

Bottom Home Top