Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Steve Bloom
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 215 216 217 218
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
It does seem as though one player, or both, missed the alert of 1NT. It is your duty to make alerts in such a way that both opponents see (or hear, or both) that alert.

Seems appropriate to ask, “Did you see the alert of 1NT?”
an hour ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
True, there is no longer a Law of Coincidence, but that doesn't keep us from ruling sanely. UI may be given by a long huddle, but there are other ways to transmit UI, and the length of the huddle is not the only factor.

Sometime, even without a codified Law of Coincidence, the auction speaks for itself. As an example: Player A holds
AJ108 KQJ5 KQ3 Qx. Partner opens 1 and the auction proceeds:
2NT (Strong raise) 4NT (KC)
5D (1) 5S
6S

No matter what was claimed about tempo, hesitation, whatever, if slam is cold, I roll it back. And I guarantee this: This player A, holding the same 18 count, but off two aces, would always pass five spades. Players react pretty consistently when they ask for aces and come up short. They shrug, or they look a bit disappointed, or they mutter “oh well.” Player A knows, when partner asks, then signs off, either thoughtfully, or in tempo, that this sequence invites a slam.

Second example: I won't give a hand, but, at favorable, the auction starts out:
1 2 2 3 4
P.

Notice, despite the colors, this player passed over four hearts, and did not save. If it was right to bid five diamonds, then it was certainly right before passing this around to partner.

But, of course, partner doubles, maybe a bit out of tempo, and now comes five diamonds. And now, suddenly, it becomes right to take the save we forgot to take earlier? Why? Naturally, because we know, from tempo, or mannerisms, that partner isn't happy doubling. So this double is optional, and we guess the right option.

I am being cynical, but it is 100% that, on this Kniest hand, had South held two less clubs, and KQ9x in hearts, North would pass four hearts doubled. This North knows partner's tempo, and knows that this double is not based on trump tricks.

The auction speaks for itself. North chose to defend four hearts, but only changed horses when South made a “help me out, partner” double.

I never buy the “I was going to defend, but couldn't very well sit with all these diamonds when partner doubles.”

Two seconds, five seconds, five minutes. I roll the contract back to four hearts doubled.
16 hours ago
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
No, the overcall style might impact the range of the single raise, and it certainly would impact what we consider a penalty double. But, again, if I had a hand that did not want to defend three clubs, I would not pass three clubs around to partner.

I overcalled, and partner raised. Opener tried three clubs. I said, “I've had enough. Let's defend.” Partner said “double”. That, by partnership agreement, could mean many hands. Perhaps it is take-out - which might make sense if double by over-caller would not be penalties. Perhaps it shows extra values, and says nothing about clubs. Or perhaps it is penalty oriented. But, if it is penalty oriented, and my partner has said, “let's defend”, then we are defending this one doubled.
April 20
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
There are many reasonable ways to play this double. But, if you choose to play this as penalty oriented, then partner will almost never pull. Virtually any hand that would pull would have competed over three clubs directly.
April 20
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Optional in direct seat makes sense. In the pass-out seat, partner has already chosen to defend. Partner exercised one option - not to play three hearts. So this double is not “optional”.
April 20
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If I held a hand with extra offense, where it looked much better to try to win nine tricks in hearts than five on defense, I would never pass three clubs. When I passed three clubs, I was content to defend. Partner now says, “Great, let's defend, doubled.” There is no hand where I would now over-rule partner, unless I had essentially psyched my overcall. Then I might have to run, trying to minimize the loss.

But, partner is certainly not welcome to pull this double.
April 20
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You had 14, dummy 6, opener AKxxx and little else. That leaves partner with a decent hand and a spade void. So why didn't partner enter the auction?
April 19
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Jeff's point is strong. I read this as 2 = four + trumps, inv +. If so, then South can, and probably should pass three hearts. If 2 = game force, South cannot pass three hearts.

South must bid as though partner gave the expected explanation.

Oh - I see Mike answered below. 2 did not set up a game force, so the director's ruling was correct.
April 16
Steve Bloom edited this comment April 16
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
UI has to suggest one alternative over another, or there can be no redress.

So, the questions here are these:

(1) What information would South have, say, behind screens?

(2) What information did South actually have?

(3) Are there differences?

(4) Do those differences, if any, make bidding game more attractive?

Answers: (1) North has a minimum, not interested in game.
(2) North has a minimum, not interested in game facing a spade-heart hand.
(3) Minor honors in spades would be upgraded, facing a fit jump. Qxx in spades would look much better than xxx in spades, and those two points elsewhere.
(4) Qxx in spades, with less values in the minor suits, makes South's hand look worse. So, though I can't see bidding game when partner rejects, game rates to be better with nothing in spades.

So, the director's ruling was reasonable.
April 16
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Three diamonds is an offer to play. The diamonds are likely limited, in either length or strength, from the failure to bid them in first seat. So, as over-caller, I am rarely passing on a doubleton diamond, but would almost always pass with three.
April 15
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Depends somewhat on methods. Hand 1, and maybe 4, are pretty clear weak two diamond openings. Are we playing that? Facing a passed hand partner, and playing an opening 2 as natural, I would expect six poor diamonds, or five good.
April 14
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
An opening 1NT call is automatic playing with robots online. So, if you think your partner is a robot, go ahead. But that may explain why you are sleeping on the couch.
April 13
ATB
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
2NT forces West to commit to the three-level or not, with a fit. 2NT removes some follow-ups by the responder. Obviously, 2NT does not take up much room. 3 pass/correct seems better.

I didn't say that I would choose 2NT - I don't play these methods and don't like methods where I don't know partner's long suit. But, white, knowing that there is a fit, and that are cards are working, competing to the three level has some merit.

The 2NT call may gain, and looks like bridge to me. The five club call looks like someone got bored.
April 13
ATB
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
OK, everyone is blasting South's bid. But, holding the South cards, if the auction went P 2 P P, would you balance?

You have at least an eight card fit, and your ace and heart jack and ten are golden. Or course, you would balance. It isn't close.

But, balancing later has let them exchange more information, and makes it easier to do the right thing.

When you know you want to go to the three level - Law and all that, then you do it right away.

My first instinct was to give North 100%. I changed it to mostly North, since the South action was borderline. But the five club call was terrible.
April 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Better minor Leb and Scrambling are, essentially, equivalent. The difference is: A direct 3 call shows values. With a weaker hand and hearts, you start with 2NT, and correct to hearts. You do the same with clubs and hearts, when partner chooses diamonds over 2NT.
April 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Next time, West will have opened 1 on a 4-4-3-2 shape, and East, with an awkward 3-3-3-4 hand, chose to raise.

The inference that partner is 4-2-2-5 seem pretty lame to me. And, of course, partner with values, and that shape, would double 2
April 12
ATB
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You borrow a king in the passout seat at the one-level.

I certainly get in the auction on a balanced 12 count at the one level (in pass-out seat). Seldom at the three level. Never at a higher level. East's hand is not exactly balanced, and could act. But pass is pretty reasonable.
April 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Clearly East had the values (and stopper in hearts) to bid 3NT over three clubs. East pretended to have diamonds along the way, planning on bidding 3NT next, and confusing the defenders.

Any risk? Certainly. Partner might raise diamonds.

I suspect that West would do something other than three clubs with both minors, so the psyche was fairly safe. In any event, it certainly was not illegal.
April 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
@Mike: No, the pass over two hearts was, by far and away, the worst bid of the auction. Not bidding five diamonds over four was almost as bad.

However, North would push on to three diamonds on many hands with no play for five, and where four might be in danger. Passing three diamonds was not so bad.
April 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You don't get rich worrying about awkward hand patterns. Besides, with a 3-3-1-6 pattern, partner can compete to three clubs over two hearts.
April 9
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 215 216 217 218
.

Bottom Home Top